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Thread: how do you transport a handgun if you do not wish to OC & you are walking?

  1. #1
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    how do you transport a handgun if you do not wish to OC & you are walking?

    most info out there is for drivers- my ccw has expired & I do not have the funds for requal right now.
    I drive a motorcycle with no place to safely store anything so I have to carry a backpack & I take long trips OC most of the way but don't want to open carry until I buy a recorder that I can use to protect myself from LE, Reno PD has been unfriendly to me b4- when I was a cab driver & caught a fare beater they called up my company and whined about me packing!
    I don't want to deal with cops until my financial situation has improved- but I really want to see tons of OC in Reno/Sparks!!!

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    Someone has to go first. The key to OC is for it to be as natural and benign as a cell phone on your belt. Once you get over the feeling that everyone is staring at you, you'll sometimes forget that you're carrying. The thing that bugs me is when I'm in a place where I can not legally carry (College) and I have a very uneasy feeling knowing that I'm unarmed. When you get to the point where being unarmed is the unnatural state, you are truly OC approved.

    As for dealing with LE, I've never had a negative encounter. I have had encounters with them, but I knew to give my name and nothing else. Hold your ground, but follow all instructions made by an LEO, remember, they are trained to use deadly force if they feel a deadly threat is imminent. Take comfort in the fact that you know you can not be charged for open carry anywhere in Nevada where firearms are not prohibited by statute. Collect any information you may need should you need to file a formal complaint against an officer's wrongdoing.

    I would be utterly thrilled if I ever saw another OCer outside of a planned OC event. I've never seen another one, but I know they are out there. We need you to come to terms with your fear of the social stigmatization that you've had pressed into your head by the Media that has convinced you that MWAG = bad. Join us, and give us a wink and a nod when you bump into one of us in public.

    The truth is, most of the time, no one even bats an eye at us, if they do, it's often a positive responce. Some people may have some apprehension about us, but these are the people we're trying to get to realize that they are perfectly safe with us around if not more-so that they would be without us around. yes there are people who have irrational fears when they see a gun on anyones hip without a firearm, but these instances are rarer than the News Media would have you think.

    Buy a holster, Carry often, apply sparingly.

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    thanks for the morale booster, but I'm looking for work.

    I have carried for years and years OC as a security guard and concealed- I simply need a way to carry while looking for work & OC isn't going to get me hired anywhere.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrsjhnsn View Post
    I have carried for years and years OC as a security guard and concealed- I simply need a way to carry while looking for work & OC isn't going to get me hired anywhere.
    You really only have two options for carrying a firearm for self defense - openly or concealed. You've let your CCW expire and can't renew it right now so you're left with only one choice: carry openly. The reason you haven't gotten any suggestions is that those are your only options (besides leaving it at home.) Putting the firearm in your backpack and carrying (or wearing) the backpack is considered carrying concealed, if I remember correctly, so I wouldn't recommend doing that until you've renewed your CCW.

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    thanks

    you don't have a cite for that do you?

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    never mind

    Quote Originally Posted by chrsjhnsn View Post
    you don't have a cite for that do you?

    http://leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-202.html#NRS202Sec350

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    Unfortunately there is no real way to transport a firearm on foot in Nevada without it either being discernible to ordinary observation or being considered to be concealed. Also see Attorney General Opinion AG 93-14. http://www.handgunlaw.us/documents/a...sConcealed.pdf

    I carry a lot in the Reno area, but I have a job where guns are not allowed, and I also spend a lot of time disarmed at the University.
    Last edited by Felid`Maximus; 07-13-2010 at 01:00 AM.

  8. #8
    28kfps
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    You might be in a real pickle. May end up having to leave the gun at home. Here is a thought. In order to take a gun on a commercial airline flight I was instructed to put the gun and magazines in a lock box and put the lock box in my luggage, which was a backpack. Go to the baggage check in, declare the firearm and they verify it is unloaded, and check it in and it is sent to the baggage hole in the plane. My point, if it was legal to carry a gun and ammo in a lock box in a backpack as I was instructed, through an airport why not every else. The lock box with the simple plastic box that came with my XD with a cheap pad lock. I called and asked if the plastic box was sufficient and if the magazines with ammo could be in the box and the answer was yes. I did this a few years ago on a Southwest flight out of McCarran to Phoenix. Another thought is a trigger lock on an unloaded gun. I have no idea where you could go to check to see if carrying unloaded in a lock box would be considered concealed. I remember seeing wording saying a gun can be made nonlethal by dismantling or blocked in a way to prevent it from firing. A trigger lock on an unloaded gun may be all you need if not I bet the lock box will work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 28kfps View Post
    You might be in a real pickle. May end up having to leave the gun at home. Here is a thought. In order to take a gun on a commercial airline flight I was instructed to put the gun and magazines in a lock box and put the lock box in my luggage, which was a backpack. Go to the baggage check in, declare the firearm and they verify it is unloaded, and check it in and it is sent to the baggage hole in the plane. My point, if it was legal to carry a gun and ammo in a lock box in a backpack as I was instructed, through an airport why not every else. The lock box with the simple plastic box that came with my XD with a cheap pad lock. I called and asked if the plastic box was sufficient and if the magazines with ammo could be in the box and the answer was yes. I did this a few years ago on a Southwest flight out of McCarran to Phoenix. Another thought is a trigger lock on an unloaded gun. I have no idea where you could go to check to see if carrying unloaded in a lock box would be considered concealed. I remember seeing wording saying a gun can be made nonlethal by dismantling or blocked in a way to prevent it from firing. A trigger lock on an unloaded gun may be all you need if not I bet the lock box will work.
    Instructed by whom? Please remember that "they told me it was ok" is not a legal defense. Even if the "they" is a police officer.

    NRS 202.3653 Definitions. As used in NRS 202.3653 to 202.369, inclusive, unless the context otherwise requires:
    1. “Concealed firearm” means a loaded or unloaded pistol, revolver or other firearm which is carried upon a person in such a manner as not to be discernible by ordinary observation.
    Ultimately, if it's being transported by your body (carried upon a person), and isn't plainly observable that it's a firearm, it's concealed. The letter of the law will trump all others if pressed in the courts.

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    If you walk out of gun shop with a case marked S&W Glock etc and proceed to walk home this is not concealed carry just the same as a holster does not conceal. It is observed ordinarily that you have a gun/gun case. If you believe it is concealed carry then this board tells everyone headed to NV to OC instead of CC to break the law by where they have a secured for transportation weapon in their personal luggage and they pick it up carrying it into public prior to getting into a rental car or taxi.

    http://www.handgunlaw.us/documents/a...sConcealed.pdf

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunrunner1911 View Post
    If you walk out of gun shop with a case marked S&W Glock etc and proceed to walk home this is not concealed carry just the same as a holster does not conceal. It is observed ordinarily that you have a gun/gun case. If you believe it is concealed carry then this board tells everyone headed to NV to OC instead of CC to break the law by where they have a secured for transportation weapon in their personal luggage and they pick it up carrying it into public prior to getting into a rental car or taxi.

    http://www.handgunlaw.us/documents/a...sConcealed.pdf
    I'm sorry but your link supports the reality that the NRS would be strictly adhered to as the letter of the law and that any firearm carried upon the person is concealed if not discernible by ordinary observation. Placing it in a gun case completely covers the weapon and at that point only the carrier knows if a weapon exists in that case, thus it is concealed. Further, in your scenario, an observer would also be required to be familiar with the makers of firearms to know that a "Glock" case meant a particular brand of firearm, may or may not be being carried, as opposed to a bag with "Nike" on it, which could one assume to then be carrying a "Nike" in said bag? Carrying in a holster is NOT equivalent by any stretch of the imagination. Carrying in a holster leaves some, if not much, of the weapon exposed. It is plainly obvious that a weapon is in the holster if one exists and is therefore not concealed.

    I don't believe that this board does tell everyone that. If you look closely this topic has been debated to great length in the past. Ultimately the consensus is usually that the carrier must do what they feel comfortable with. It is somewhat agreed upon that the letter of the law suggest that you will be unlawfully concealing the firearm. It is also, however, somewhat agreed upon that as far as can be found, no case law exists where a person has been prosecuted for carrying a concealed, secured, firearm for travel.

    Ultimately each person must do what the feel comfortable with, and interpret the laws as they see fit, as they are the ones putting their neck (and their freedom) on the line.

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    http://www.handgunlaw.us/documents/a...sConcealed.pdf

    I suppose if you want to meet the letter of the law you could carry in a transparent zip-lock bag. However, this would get more police attention than concealing in a pack or open carrying in a holster.

    A locked case in a backpack is out of sight, out of mind, and completely protected from an illegal search.

  13. #13
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    Wow one of those guys. The letter of the law or NRS says a firearm is a weapon capable of launching a projectile. Remove its ability to launch the projectile even though it looks like and smells like a firearm it is no longer considered a firearm and can be carried with the same restrictions as a baby bottle. One such accepted method to render it from launching a projectile is to dismantle it. Not all NRS will list all acceptable solutions. One might ask a LEO once he realizes the conversation is asking how to secure the firearm I believe friendly good information will come. However, I too would want to see it in some kind of official text. Could be after researching, an accepted method of rendering it from launching a projectile could be as easy as installing a trigger lock on an unloaded firearm. As I have said, in order to check in and declare a firearm it is accepted with airport metro, security, TSA, and done dozens of times a day at McCarran to have a firearm and magazine in a locked box in a backpack or luggage as you take it up to and from the baggage check in or pickup. The Firearm must be unloaded and magazine removed however, the magazine full of ammo can be in the same lock box.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 28kfps View Post
    Wow one of those guys. The letter of the law or NRS says a firearm is a weapon capable of launching a projectile. Remove its ability to launch the projectile even though it looks like and smells like a firearm it is no longer considered a firearm and can be carried with the same restrictions as a baby bottle. One such accepted method to render it from launching a projectile is to dismantle it. Not all NRS will list all acceptable solutions. One might ask a LEO once he realizes the conversation is asking how to secure the firearm I believe friendly good information will come. However, I too would want to see it in some kind of official text. Could be after researching, an accepted method of rendering it from launching a projectile could be as easy as installing a trigger lock on an unloaded firearm. As I have said, in order to check in and declare a firearm it is accepted with airport metro, security, TSA, and done dozens of times a day at McCarran to have a firearm and magazine in a locked box in a backpack or luggage as you take it up to and from the baggage check in or pickup. The Firearm must be unloaded and magazine removed however, the magazine full of ammo can be in the same lock box.
    Please cite. Here is MY understanding. The areas in bold and underlined are what are important to the topic. Since the weapon is still a pistol, or revolver, even if you are correct in it no longer being a firearm (pending cite) then it is still a concealed weapon according to the NRS.

    NRS 202.350 Manufacture, importation, possession or use of dangerous weapon or silencer; carrying concealed weapon without permit; penalties; issuance of permit to carry concealed weapon; exceptions.
    1. Except as otherwise provided in this section and NRS 202.355 and 202.3653 to 202.369, inclusive, a person within this State shall not:

    (a) Manufacture or cause to be manufactured, or import into the State, or keep, offer or expose for sale, or give, lend or possess any knife which is made an integral part of a belt buckle or any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a switchblade knife, blackjack, slungshot, billy, sand-club, sandbag or metal knuckles;
    (b) Manufacture or cause to be manufactured, or import into the State, or keep, offer or expose for sale, or give, lend, possess or use a machine gun or a silencer, unless authorized by federal law;
    (c) With the intent to inflict harm upon the person of another, possess or use a nunchaku or trefoil; or
    (d) Carry concealed upon his or her person any:
    (1) Explosive substance, other than ammunition or any components thereof;
    (2) Dirk, dagger or machete;
    (3) Pistol, revolver or other firearm, or other dangerous or deadly weapon; or
    (4) Knife which is made an integral part of a belt buckle.

    2. Except as otherwise provided in NRS 202.275 and 212.185, a person who violates any of the provisions of:
    (a) Paragraph (a) or (c) or subparagraph (2) or (4) of paragraph (d) of subsection 1 is guilty:
    (1) For the first offense, of a gross misdemeanor.
    (2) For any subsequent offense, of a category D felony and shall be punished as provided in NRS 193.130.
    (b) Paragraph (b) or subparagraph (1) or (3) of paragraph (d) of subsection 1 is guilty of a category C felony and shall be punished as provided in NRS 193.130.
    3. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, the sheriff of any county may, upon written application by a resident of that county showing the reason or the purpose for which a concealed weapon is to be carried, issue a permit authorizing the applicant to carry in this State the concealed weapon described in the permit. The sheriff shall not issue a permit to a person to carry a switchblade knife. This subsection does not authorize the sheriff to issue a permit to a person to carry a pistol, revolver or other firearm.
    4. Except as otherwise provided in subsection 5, this section does not apply to:
    (a) Sheriffs, constables, marshals, peace officers, correctional officers employed by the Department of Corrections, special police officers, police officers of this State, whether active or honorably retired, or other appointed officers.
    (b) Any person summoned by any peace officer to assist in making arrests or preserving the peace while the person so summoned is actually engaged in assisting such an officer.
    (c) Any full-time paid peace officer of an agency of the United States or another state or political subdivision thereof when carrying out official duties in the State of Nevada.
    (d) Members of the Armed Forces of the United States when on duty.
    5. The exemptions provided in subsection 4 do not include a former peace officer who is retired for disability unless his or her former employer has approved his or her fitness to carry a concealed weapon.
    6. The provisions of paragraph (b) of subsection 1 do not apply to any person who is licensed, authorized or permitted to possess or use a machine gun or silencer pursuant to federal law. The burden of establishing federal licensure, authorization or permission is upon the person possessing the license, authorization or permission.
    7. This section shall not be construed to prohibit a qualified law enforcement officer or a qualified retired law enforcement officer from carrying a concealed weapon in this State if he or she is authorized to do so pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 926B or 926C.
    8. As used in this section:
    (a) “Concealed weapon” means a weapon described in this section that is carried upon a person in such a manner as not to be discernible by ordinary observation.
    (b) “Honorably retired” means retired in Nevada after completion of 10 years of creditable service as a member of the Public Employees’ Retirement System. A former peace officer is not “honorably retired” if he or she was discharged for cause or resigned before the final disposition of allegations of serious misconduct.
    (c) “Machine gun” means any weapon which shoots, is designed to shoot or can be readily restored to shoot more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger.
    (d) “Nunchaku” means an instrument consisting of two or more sticks, clubs, bars or rods connected by a rope, cord, wire or chain used as a weapon in forms of Oriental combat.
    (e) “Qualified law enforcement officer” has the meaning ascribed to it in 18 U.S.C. § 926B(c).
    (f) “Qualified retired law enforcement officer” has the meaning ascribed to it in 18 U.S.C. § 926C(c).
    (g) “Silencer” means any device for silencing, muffling or diminishing the report of a firearm, including any combination of parts, designed or redesigned, and intended for use in assembling or fabricating a silencer or muffler, and any part intended only for use in such assembly or fabrication.
    (h) “Switchblade knife” means a spring-blade knife, snap-blade knife or any other knife having the appearance of a pocketknife, any blade of which is 2 or more inches long and which can be released automatically by a flick of a button, pressure on the handle or other mechanical device, or is released by any type of mechanism. The term does not include a knife which has a blade that is held in place by a spring if the blade does not have any type of automatic release.
    (i) “Trefoil” means an instrument consisting of a metal plate having three or more radiating points with sharp edges, designed in the shape of a star, cross or other geometric figure and used as a weapon for throwing.
    [1:47:1925; NCL § 2302] + [3:47:1925; NCL § 2304]—(NRS A 1959, 548; 1963, 90; 1967, 486; 1973, 190, 900; 1977, 269, 880; 1979, 1435; 1985, 452, 593, 792; 1989, 653; 1995, 1207, 2726; 1997, 826, 1601; 1999, 421, 1208; 2001, 575; 2003, 1351; 2005, 594)p

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmijackso View Post
    Please cite. Here is MY understanding. The areas in bold and underlined are what are important to the topic. Since the weapon is still a pistol, or revolver, even if you are correct in it no longer being a firearm (pending cite) then it is still a concealed weapon according to the NRS.
    Nope. By using, an acceptable method stopping it from launching a projectile it is no longer a dangerous weapon. I cannot cite it. However I know I read somewhere just have not had time to find the NRS where it talks about a firearm is designed to launch a projectile. Just like citing the NRS that says you can open carry in Nevada. There is no such NRS. Since there is none saying you cannot carry it has been accepted to mean open carry is allowed. There is a NRS that says a firearm is anything capable of launching a projectile applying the same thought process used for open carry if you make it unable to launch a projectile it is no longer a firearm. I am not sure what you mean by saying since a weapon is still a pistol. Not trying to be insulting but for clarification we both know anything can be used as a weapon. A toy pistol is not a weapon nor is a non-shooting exact replica of a 1911 a weapon however they both are pistols. This is one of those almost never seen times where a tiny bit of common sense is allowed, make the gun where it cannot shoot it is no longer a dangerous weapon. The hard part may be finding the minimum acceptable requirement. A little humor, I know bashing it with a very large hammer would stop it from being fired just not sure how to un-bash it.

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    When I made my first firearm purchase, I called the Sheriffs office and asked them how I could get it home stowed in a backpack. they told me that if the firearm was disassembled, and locked in a hard case with a trigger lock in place, it would be considered inoperable and the sheriff would not charge me with violating Nevada law if I stowed the firearm in my backpack. they did say that they couldn't speak for Metro, NHP or any other law enforcement authority. What they did tell me (and I was shocked by this) that for all intents and purposes, it would be unlikely that a law abiding citizen would be discovered carrying their firearm home from the place of purchase unlawfully concealed unless they volunteered that information to law enforcement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 28kfps View Post
    Not trying to be insulting but for clarification we both know anything can be used as a weapon. A toy pistol is not a weapon nor is a non-shooting exact replica of a 1911 a weapon however they both are pistols. This is one of those almost never seen times where a tiny bit of common sense is allowed, make the gun where it cannot shoot it is no longer a dangerous weapon. The hard part may be finding the minimum acceptable requirement. A little humor, I know bashing it with a very large hammer would stop it from being fired just not sure how to un-bash it.
    What I was trying to say, was that the NRS says "pistol, revolver, or other firearm". So, even if you are correct in the definition of firearm being a device capable of launching a projectile. Common sense and most people on a jury, would still look at a trigger locked pistol, and still say that it is a pistol, and therefore is still regulated under the NRS I cited as being a concealed weapon.

    I agree that there is likely some level of disassembly/destruction that would render it no longer a "weapon", but I fear that it is likely complete disassembly, or at very least removal of the firing pin (such as is required for sale of most fully automatic military issue weapons).

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    I believe the definition being refereed to is

    NRS 202.253 Definitions. As used in NRS 202.253 to 202.369, inclusive:
    1. “Explosive or incendiary device” means any explosive or incendiary material or substance that has been constructed, altered, packaged or arranged in such a manner that its ordinary use would cause destruction or injury to life or property.
    2. “Firearm” means any device designed to be used as a weapon from which a projectile may be expelled through the barrel by the force of any explosion or other form of combustion.
    3. “Firearm capable of being concealed upon the person” applies to and includes all firearms having a barrel less than 12 inches in length.
    4. “Motor vehicle” means every vehicle that is self-propelled.
    (Added to NRS by 1977, 879; A 1979, 157; 1989, 1239; 1995, 1151, 2533, 2726; 1997, 662, 826; 2001, 805; 2003, 1350; 2005, 594)
    This is definitely interesting topic, each time I have made a purchase from a gun store, BassPro being where I purchased my M&P40C. I was handed the pistol in its manufactures plastic case, not locked, unloaded, trigger lock installed, just before you are to walk out of the store. I did not have ammo this day as I was not purchasing any at the time. I then proceeded to walk to my vehicle and drive home. The firearm at this point was not capable of being fired, but none the less IS designed to be used as a weapon.

    This is of course is another classic case of the NRS language being vague at best. As the above NRS states that a Firearm is: "...any device designed to be used as a weapon from which a projectile may be expelled through the barrel by the force of any explosion or other form of combustion." So by pure definition and literal translation, the gun you just purchased is very much designed to be used as a weapon therefore is a weapon.NRS makes no mention of being "capable of launching..." However, it would be asinine to say the least to be charged under NRS 202.350 carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, and not sure how well it would hold up in court. IANAL

    I dont believe it is feasible to always go by the "strict letter of the law", we have to remember these laws were written by humans which are fallible. Our very own constitution is "interpreted" to say our laws are not would be ignorant. Every day laws being broken or blurred lines of breaking laws are overlooked by LEO. IMHO if you were stopped for some reason or another and were transporting a firearm that was rendered incapable of being used you most likely would not run into a issue with that officer. Afterall, in most cases its officers discretion if they feel like charging you with something at that moment. YMMV

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    Quote Originally Posted by Remmy View Post
    I believe the definition being refereed to is



    This is definitely interesting topic, each time I have made a purchase from a gun store, BassPro being where I purchased my M&P40C. I was handed the pistol in its manufactures plastic case, not locked, unloaded, trigger lock installed, just before you are to walk out of the store. I did not have ammo this day as I was not purchasing any at the time. I then proceeded to walk to my vehicle and drive home. The firearm at this point was not capable of being fired, but none the less IS designed to be used as a weapon.

    This is of course is another classic case of the NRS language being vague at best. As the above NRS states that a Firearm is: "...any device designed to be used as a weapon from which a projectile may be expelled through the barrel by the force of any explosion or other form of combustion." So by pure definition and literal translation, the gun you just purchased is very much designed to be used as a weapon therefore is a weapon.NRS makes no mention of being "capable of launching..." However, it would be asinine to say the least to be charged under NRS 202.350 carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, and not sure how well it would hold up in court. IANAL

    I dont believe it is feasible to always go by the "strict letter of the law", we have to remember these laws were written by humans which are fallible. Our very own constitution is "interpreted" to say our laws are not would be ignorant. Every day laws being broken or blurred lines of breaking laws are overlooked by LEO. IMHO if you were stopped for some reason or another and were transporting a firearm that was rendered incapable of being used you most likely would not run into a issue with that officer. Afterall, in most cases its officers discretion if they feel like charging you with something at that moment. YMMV
    I agree with most every part of this. My only difference is that I feel that the "worst case scenario" is that the law will be enforced to the "strict letter" and you must therefore plan accordingly. If you plan accordingly, and the law happens to be enforced more leniently than written, then no harm no foul. If however you expect it to be enforced more leniently and are wrong, you're in a world of hurt. The reality is, that despite the intentions of a law, it can be enforced as far as the strict letter, whether it will be or not is purely a gamble, and one I prefer to not take.

    I agree that it is often officers discretion, I personally won't rely on it being in my favor when it comes to whether or not I've committed a crime, especially a felony. I too carried my first purchase out of the store in the box it came in, but have since read and understood more about the laws, and do so no longer. It's very much YMMV. Probably 1 in a million law abiding citizens would ever have a problem, maybe even fewer, but it sure would be bad the be the 1.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gmijackso View Post
    I agree with most every part of this. My only difference is that I feel that the "worst case scenario" is that the law will be enforced to the "strict letter" and you must therefore plan accordingly. If you plan accordingly, and the law happens to be enforced more leniently than written, then no harm no foul. If however you expect it to be enforced more leniently and are wrong, you're in a world of hurt. The reality is, that despite the intentions of a law, it can be enforced as far as the strict letter, whether it will be or not is purely a gamble, and one I prefer to not take.

    I agree that it is often officers discretion, I personally won't rely on it being in my favor when it comes to whether or not I've committed a crime, especially a felony. I too carried my first purchase out of the store in the box it came in, but have since read and understood more about the laws, and do so no longer. It's very much YMMV. Probably 1 in a million law abiding citizens would ever have a problem, maybe even fewer, but it sure would be bad the be the 1.
    Indeed it is a crap shoot when it comes to any law that is open to any interpretation. I have always hated the fact that whether or not Ill be charged with a crime is up to the officer. A LEO that just found out his wife was doing the mailman and is out on patrol i do not want to meet.

    Quote Originally Posted by gmijackso View Post
    I too carried my first purchase out of the store in the box it came in, but have since read and understood more about the laws, and do so no longer.
    curious as to how after knowing such laws you carry your newly purchased weapon out of a store you just bought it from? I have only ever just walked out to my car like Ive described. Do you field strip prior to having the sales person wrap it up and finalize?
    Last edited by Remmy; 07-16-2010 at 12:21 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Remmy View Post
    curious as to how after knowing such laws you carry your newly purchased weapon out of a store you just bought it from? I have only ever just walked out to my car like Ive described. Do you field strip prior to having the sales person wrap it up and finalize?
    I will note that I've only purchased pistols here in NV, and as such holster it out just like any other pistol you carry openly. If the store isn't ok with that, no need to do business with them. Should also be noted that a long gun, according to NRS, isn't capable of being concealed so you can carry those (guns with a barrel longer than 12") any way you wish (providing there isn't a round in the chamber, but I was speaking concealment-wise).

  22. #22
    28kfps
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remmy View Post
    I believe the definition being refereed to is



    This is definitely interesting topic, each time I have made a purchase from a gun store, BassPro being where I purchased my M&P40C. I was handed the pistol in its manufactures plastic case, not locked, unloaded, trigger lock installed, just before you are to walk out of the store. I did not have ammo this day as I was not purchasing any at the time. I then proceeded to walk to my vehicle and drive home. The firearm at this point was not capable of being fired, but none the less IS designed to be used as a weapon.

    This is of course is another classic case of the NRS language being vague at best. As the above NRS states that a Firearm is: "...any device designed to be used as a weapon from which a projectile may be expelled through the barrel by the force of any explosion or other form of combustion." So by pure definition and literal translation, the gun you just purchased is very much designed to be used as a weapon therefore is a weapon.NRS makes no mention of being "capable of launching..." However, it would be asinine to say the least to be charged under NRS 202.350 carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, and not sure how well it would hold up in court. IANAL

    I dont believe it is feasible to always go by the "strict letter of the law", we have to remember these laws were written by humans which are fallible. Our very own constitution is "interpreted" to say our laws are not would be ignorant. Every day laws being broken or blurred lines of breaking laws are overlooked by LEO. IMHO if you were stopped for some reason or another and were transporting a firearm that was rendered incapable of being used you most likely would not run into a issue with that officer. Afterall, in most cases its officers discretion if they feel like charging you with something at that moment. YMMV
    This is the NRS I remember reading. Expelling a projectile instead of me saying launching. I personally would have no problem carrying an unloaded firearm with the magazine removed in a lock box with full magazines in the same box in a backpack if the need ever came up. As I said, I have done it twice at the airport as directed by airport instructions. After the baggage person verified and tagged it, I was instructed to take it over to the TSA person still in the unsecured baggage area to have it run through the x-ray machine by hand instead of sending it with the general baggage. I slipped the lock box into the backpack and carried it over to the TSA person. Removed the lock box from the backpack in front of the TSA person told him even though it is obvious it was a firearm he took it and sent it on its way. Both the baggage person and the TSA person knew I had been carrying a firearm in a backpack.
    I agree there is nothing like having the nice fuzzy felling of a NRS or something saying carrying in such a manner is good to go. However, a word that is often used is intent. It is obvious by carrying a firearm in the above method the intent is NOT to carry concealed and ready to use in less than a second. It shows the intent to carry the firearm in a very secure, safe and legally way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 28kfps View Post
    I agree there is nothing like having the nice fuzzy felling of a NRS or something saying carrying in such a manner is good to go. However, a word that is often used is intent. It is obvious by carrying a firearm in the above method the intent is NOT to carry concealed and ready to use in less than a second. It shows the intent to carry the firearm in a very secure, safe and legally way.
    Obviously you're free to do as you feel fit, as is everyone. But to me, the difference in the "fuzzy" feeling or not is the difference in whether there simply lacks NRS allowing AND denying it (such as OC), and there actually being a NRS denying it, as is this case. The part that is being overlooked is that the NRS defining a firearm says DESIGNED. Even in a locked case unloaded and trigger locked, it was still DESIGNED to be a weapon which expels a projectile... therefore is still a firearm. Also, as I noted in previous NRS I quoted, it is also still a pistol and/or revolver, and is still subject to the concealed weapons law. So, in the end, it's a firearm, and a pistol, and possibly a revolver, and is therefore most definitely covered by the NRS I quoted earlier.

    Again, everyone should do as they feel comfortable, but to me, caution is the better part of valor, and as Remmy said, I'd hate to be carrying that way on a day I'm stopped by LEO that just found out his wife was doing the mailman.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmijackso View Post
    I will note that I've only purchased pistols here in NV, and as such holster it out just like any other pistol you carry openly. If the store isn't ok with that, no need to do business with them. Should also be noted that a long gun, according to NRS, isn't capable of being concealed so you can carry those (guns with a barrel longer than 12") any way you wish (providing there isn't a round in the chamber, but I was speaking concealment-wise).
    wow I never even thought of that option to be honest. I do know for a fact that bassPro wont allow it hell they wont even let you walk to the front of the store with it, a manager is called and they escort you to the front. but then again this store is MUCH bigger then your average gun store. next time im in there I will grab ahold of a manager and discuss this. Great way to carry and be completely legal in my opinion when purchasing and taking your new baby home!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remmy View Post
    wow I never even thought of that option to be honest. I do know for a fact that bassPro wont allow it hell they wont even let you walk to the front of the store with it, a manager is called and they escort you to the front. but then again this store is MUCH bigger then your average gun store. next time im in there I will grab ahold of a manager and discuss this. Great way to carry and be completely legal in my opinion when purchasing and taking your new baby home!
    Really? That surprises me. I've never purchased from them, but I do understand that they allow OC in the store (or so it's been reported on the forum), just so long as you're not going to the range, I don't know first hand, I don't go there often and when I do it's always on my way home from work, which disallows firearms on the property at all.

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