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Thread: Visiting Las Vegas - What do I need to know?

  1. #1
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    Visiting Las Vegas - What do I need to know?

    I may be visiting Las Vegas with my girlfriend next year. I am a Texas resident and have my Texas CCW permit, which, unfortunately, I have learned that it does not have reciprocity with Nevada. I am currently a U.S Air Force reservist but will get my Lt's commission by the time vacation to Vegas comes.

    So CCW is out of the picture.

    I've read that open-carry is legal but I don't know much about the details about the laws. Will I need to register my handgun with Clark County if I'm visiting for a few days? Am I allowed to OC with a loaded magazine and chamber? What is the rundown on OC'ing in the Strip area as well as Las Vegas proper?

    Any other relevant information would be appreciated. Thank you.

  2. #2
    Regular Member Sabotage70's Avatar
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    You can carry FULLY loaded. You don't have to register if you're just staying a few days. And you can carry on the strip. And some of the hotels are ok with it. Just last Sat. we walked through Harrahs right in front of security and he didn't even flinch.

    EDC=XDm40 16+1+16+16

    RED DRAGONS!!!!

  3. #3
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    Wow that makes me wish Texas was an OC state

    Any restrictions on type of firearm, holster, ammunition, etc?

    Also how are your self-defense laws there in the rare chance that I find myself in a situation?

    Related question: What are the laws in terms of firearms storage in a car, particularly pistol and rifle?

    Thanks for the help man

    ETA: I know you mentioned that some hotels are ok but what about other casinos? Also what are carry laws with regards to carrying in alcohol-serving establishments?
    Last edited by Codename46; 07-20-2010 at 10:26 PM.

  4. #4
    Regular Member Sabotage70's Avatar
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    No restrictions on firearms, ammo(except tracers) or holsters. We just recommend that you use some type of retention. Carry it any where in your car, under your seat, glove box center console. You can even keep your holster and pistol on your side. Just don't conceal it on your person. Rifle is the same but just can't be chambered.

    As far as the SD laws are concerned. Some might say they're not as good as Texas. Where you can shot someone that's breaking into your vehicle while from the safety of your home. But you know as a gun owner it's best to keep your nose clean.

    When I said hotel that also meant casino. You can carry in places that serve alcohol. You can even have a drink, just don't reach a BAL of more than .10.
    EDC=XDm40 16+1+16+16

    RED DRAGONS!!!!

  5. #5
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    I've open carried in rural bars

    with no problem-other than someone thinking I was a cop.
    I don't drink so I don't know for sure but I think the only trouble from drinking you can get is being in posession of a gun while being over the legal driving limit....08? IDK because I never drink.

  6. #6
    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrsjhnsn View Post
    with no problem-other than someone thinking I was a cop.
    I don't drink so I don't know for sure but I think the only trouble from drinking you can get is being in posession of a gun while being over the legal driving limit....08? IDK because I never drink.
    You can have a beer in your hand while carrying a firearm, provided you're BAC is < .10

    NRS 202.257 Possession of firearm when under influence of alcohol, controlled substance or other intoxicating substance; administration of evidentiary test; penalty; forfeiture of firearm.
    1. It is unlawful for a person who:
    (a) Has a concentration of alcohol of 0.10 or more in his or her blood or breath; or
    (b) Is under the influence of any controlled substance, or is under the combined influence of intoxicating liquor and a controlled substance, or any person who inhales, ingests, applies or otherwise uses any chemical, poison or organic solvent, or any compound or combination of any of these, to a degree which renders him or her incapable of safely exercising actual physical control of a firearm,
    Ê to have in his or her actual physical possession any firearm. This prohibition does not apply to the actual physical possession of a firearm by a person who was within the person’s personal residence and had the firearm in his or her possession solely for self-defense.
    2. Any evidentiary test to determine whether a person has violated the provisions of subsection 1 must be administered in the same manner as an evidentiary test that is administered pursuant to NRS 484C.160 to 484C.250, inclusive, except that submission to the evidentiary test is required of any person who is directed by a police officer to submit to the test. If a person to be tested fails to submit to a required test as directed by a police officer, the officer may direct that reasonable force be used to the extent necessary to obtain the samples of blood from the person to be tested, if the officer has reasonable cause to believe that the person to be tested was in violation of this section.
    3. Any person who violates the provisions of subsection 1 is guilty of a misdemeanor.
    4. A firearm is subject to forfeiture pursuant to NRS 179.1156 to 179.119, inclusive, only if, during the violation of subsection 1, the firearm is brandished, aimed or otherwise handled by the person in a manner which endangered others.
    5. As used in this section, the phrase “concentration of alcohol of 0.10 or more in his or her blood or breath” means 0.10 gram or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of the blood of a person or per 210 liters of his or her breath.
    (Added to NRS by 1995, 2533; A 1999, 2470; 2003, 2565)

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