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Thread: Carry Gun Cleaning Question

  1. #1
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    Carry Gun Cleaning Question

    Some say after your normal periodic cleaning to run a lightly oiled patch down the barrel. Others say that before shooting you should run a dry patch through to remove any oil. So what do you do for your carry gun?

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    Regular Member sultan62's Avatar
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    Dry patch, though I'll typically spray the moving parts with a tiny bit of RemOil and work the slide a few times, then soak up the excess with another patch.

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    Regular Member t33j's Avatar
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    Last two patches through all of my barrels are:
    1) Heavily Oiled folded twice
    2) Dry folded once

    That leaves a thin film of oil in the barrel but I have salt air to contend with around where I live. I have not noticed any adverse effects other than perhaps a discoloration of the chambered round.

    I don't do anything before I shoot.

    From my understanding the oil is for rust protection, and its removal is to prevent excess pressure buildup in the barrel.
    Last edited by t33j; 08-08-2010 at 10:24 PM.
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    A carry gun and especially a concealed carry gun should be kept 'dry' lest the lubricant collect lint and dirt. I wiped my CCW daily and a boresnake short of the bristle. A shooter or your carry gun that you know is going to be shot - taken to the range - should be lubricated IAW the mfgr's instructions. The major wear on a modern gun is improper and too frequent cleaning.

    I CCW'd in Charleston, SC with no notable rust.
    Last edited by Doug Huffman; 08-08-2010 at 10:33 PM.

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    Regular Member gsx1138's Avatar
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    Nothing.

    I oil the slide rails every once and awhile and that's it.

    XD45 with 2k rounds and no failures.

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    Regular Member Brent Evertz's Avatar
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    I use CLP and will send down a slightly wet patch to keep the metal inside the barrel protected. I also rub the CLP on the moving parts and exterior of gun, let soak for about 5 min, then I wipe dry with a rag.

    Of course after firing, the cleaning techniques change a bit by using wire brushes, q-tips, and scrapers for removal of carbon build up.
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    I clean and oil everything... inside and out of the barrel... but I wipe off excess so no "visible" residue remains. Thin, protective layer but nothing to gum up the works.

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    Wipeout/oil

    I like Wipeout for cleaning and light oil w/dry swab prior to carry. 20 plus years no failures no rust.

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    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    I use synthetic grease (not OIL!) for the slide rails and other metal on metal parts.

    I then use synthetic oil for a few of the barrel/slide contact points.

    I do not oil the inside of the barrel because as a daily OC gun (Sig 229), its surprising how much gunk that can somehow find its way in your barrel.
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

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    barricade

    I use barricade wipes. They are in individual sealed pouches. "Rust protection for firearms. A take along gun cloth"
    i wipe the outside with a dry cloth b4 reholstering

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    What's this "cleaning" thing?
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    Quote Originally Posted by nny420 View Post
    I use barricade wipes. They are in individual sealed pouches. "Rust protection for firearms. A take along gun cloth"
    i wipe the outside with a dry cloth b4 reholstering
    I hear those are nice.
    However, I have crossed rivers chest deep , been in salt water, snow and mud puddles with my Sig's and Glocks and not one speck of rust.

    I cant imagine rust being that much of an issue wearing a gun on your hip throughout the regular day.
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

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    Regular Member OC for ME's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tawnos View Post
    What's this "cleaning" thing?
    Yeah, what you said. I just rinse mine off every now and then with the garden hose, the ole pistola looks great.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Huffman View Post
    The major wear on a modern gun is improper and too frequent cleaning.
    So running a 100% cotton patch through the barrel a few times at less than 1 foot per second causes more wear than 40,000 psi accelerating copper-jacketed lead to over 1,000 fps?

    Yeah...
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    Quote Originally Posted by since9 View Post
    So running a 100% cotton patch through the barrel a few times at less than 1 foot per second causes more wear than 40,000 psi accelerating copper-jacketed lead to over 1,000 fps?

    Yeah...
    I can see the argument for someone that improperly uses a collapsible steel cleaning rod (the joints wearing away at the muzzle throat if you let them rub), but yeah, properly cleaning a gun shouldn't cause any wear at all.
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    rust

    Quote Originally Posted by Sig229 View Post
    I hear those are nice.
    However, I have crossed rivers chest deep , been in salt water, snow and mud puddles with my Sig's and Glocks and not one speck of rust.

    I cant imagine rust being that much of an issue wearing a gun on your hip throughout the regular day.
    It usually starts on the guns sittin not getting used. I live a couple blocks from the pacific ocean so my thought is preventitive maintenance. I try to shoot every weekend and and use barracade to clean with after... i dont care for rem oil too much but it has its place. Sig, how do you clean your gun you said you use synthetic lube but what about for getting carbon buildup off?

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    Regular Member MamaLiberty's Avatar
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    Heavy duty lead and carbon build up or copper sludge in the barrel require specialized solvents. Ordinary cleaning after a day's shooting is always a good idea. Light cleaning can be done with things like "Gunzilla," a new favorite of mine. After any kind of cleaning, a light coat of EEZoX prevents rust and provides a good, dry lubrication that does not attract lint or gunk. I carry a stainless steel .357M openly all the time. It gets wiped down at least once a week. It's fairly dry here, but I've worn this gun all day in the field, even in the rain with no problems.

    But no, I would not stop to run a dry patch down the barrel before I shoot.

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    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nny420 View Post
    Sig, how do you clean your gun you said you use synthetic lube but what about for getting carbon buildup off?
    For cleaning the barrel I just use either gun scrubber or hoppes copper solvent for the barrel.
    And after running dry patches when Im done cleaning the barrel, I leave it dry. I dont use lube in the barrel.

    People all too often over use lube on guns.

    I too used to live two blocs from teh Atlantic ocean and also the Chesapeake bay (which is also salty) and never had any rust from the salty air.

    Now, if you spent most of your days on an open air boat out in the sea, I could see some specs of rust becoming a problem.
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    Regular Member TechnoWeenie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sig229 View Post
    I use synthetic grease (not OIL!) for the slide rails and other metal on metal parts.

    I then use synthetic oil for a few of the barrel/slide contact points.

    I do not oil the inside of the barrel because as a daily OC gun (Sig 229), its surprising how much gunk that can somehow find its way in your barrel.
    Easy to remember,


    If it slides, use grease. If it rotates, use oil.
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  20. #20
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    All the rounds I put through are copper jacketed, so I do three things with my firearm each and every time I shoot:

    1. Disassemble it into all parts which do not require gunsmithing tools.

    2. Liberally soak all parts with Hoppes #9 to remove powder, metal fouling, and rust.

    3. Meanwhile, hand-wash the plastic grips in luke-warm dishwashing soap, rinse well, and dry.

    4. Scrub/wipe/patch all parts parts as per step 2.

    5. Spray the hard-to-reach parts like the trigger/hammer mechanism with a spray solvent like Birchwood Casey Bore Scrubber. I find it best to use short bursts while working the mechanism between shots and allowing the solvent to drip away. Saves on a LOT of solvent.

    6. Spray with Hoppes Blast & Shine, which removes all traces (particularly the odor) of any solvents and lubes. Alternatively, I've found plain old brake cleaner to be exceptionally adept at this task, if not far cheaper. It's pretty good at removing the painted dots on your sights and safety position, too... Again, quick shots while allowing most of it to drip away, along with any residue, does a more thorough job while saving on solvent.

    7. Liberally spray Remington Gun Oil on all parts of firearm.

    8. Wipe as clean-free as possible with a clean, dry, 100% cotton cloth. An old t-shirt works best. Please note - be sure to ask your significant other NOT to use dryer towels with these... You want them clean, not filled with various residues that might interact with any of the solvents to form a gunky residue (yes, it happened to me one time).

    Elapsed time: 20 minutes.

    Note 1: For annual cleaning, I do much the same, only far more thoroughly, and I also apply a thin layer of waterproof synthetic grease to all completely clean and dry surfaces before re-cleaning everything with a spray solvent then spraying with Rem oil. Elapsed time: 1 hour.

    Note 2: I've also known folks who simply soak the parts in Varsol (used in automotive/mechanic's shops) and wipe clean before reassembly, but I wouldn't recommend doing so without cleaning off the Varsol with a solvent then lubricating normally. While Varsol winds up containing a lot of oils and greases from the car parts it cleans, it also winds up containing a lot of corrosive combustion products, as well, which is why good mechanics always do a final pure solvent parts cleaning followed by drying, then lubricating with light machine oil such as Helmar's Super-Lube.

    Note 3: I've also known folks to substitute expensive Rem oil with far less expensive motor oil (5W-50, 10W-30, whatever). That'll work, but machine oil is formulated to collect a minimal amount of dust. Being in an enclosed space, motor oil doesn't have a dust problem, but on your hip it will gunk up.

    Bottom line: If all you do is thoroughly soak/scrub/wipe/bore patch your disassembled firearm after each shooting and once or twice a year if you're not shooting with Hoppes #9 before wiping it as clean as possible, you can hardly go wrong.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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