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Thread: Quick Draw Beretta92FSLady

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    Regular Member Beretta92FSLady's Avatar
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    Quick Draw Beretta92FSLady

    This subject has in part been taken from another thread that talked about carrying your sidearm chambered v. not chambered.

    I have been practicing quick-draw with my Beretta from my OWB Crossbreed holster. It can be quite a workout, actually. What had me thinking about this was the fact that once you realize a threat and are able to draw your sidearm, some time has passed. You could cut valuable seconds from quick-drawing on a perp that is to close for comfort.

    Youtube offers no videos that I could find on quick-draw autos. Does anyone else practice this? The range I am a member of does not allow you to work from the holster--I really need to find somewhere close to Seattle where I can occasionally work from the holster.
    I don't mind watching the OC-Community (tea party 2.0's, who have hijacked the OC-Community) cannibalize itself. I do mind watching OC dragged through the gutter. OC is an exercise of A Right. I choose to not OC; I choose to not own firearms. I choose to leave the OC-Community to it's own self-inflicted injuries, and eventual implosion. Carry on...

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    Regular Member bennie1986's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beretta92FSLady View Post
    This subject has in part been taken from another thread that talked about carrying your sidearm chambered v. not chambered.

    I have been practicing quick-draw with my Beretta from my OWB Crossbreed holster. It can be quite a workout, actually. What had me thinking about this was the fact that once you realize a threat and are able to draw your sidearm, some time has passed. You could cut valuable seconds from quick-drawing on a perp that is to close for comfort.

    Youtube offers no videos that I could find on quick-draw autos. Does anyone else practice this? The range I am a member of does not allow you to work from the holster--I really need to find somewhere close to Seattle where I can occasionally work from the holster.
    I practice from the holster all the time. I think it would be dumb not to.

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    Snap caps are really useful for home holster practice, and they're great for tap and rack drills too.

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    Regular Member Beretta92FSLady's Avatar
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    I use snap caps.
    I don't mind watching the OC-Community (tea party 2.0's, who have hijacked the OC-Community) cannibalize itself. I do mind watching OC dragged through the gutter. OC is an exercise of A Right. I choose to not OC; I choose to not own firearms. I choose to leave the OC-Community to it's own self-inflicted injuries, and eventual implosion. Carry on...

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    Todd Jarrett

    If you youtube search Todd Jarrett you'll find videos from grip to drawing, stances etc.
    This guy is insanely fast.. I'm a newbie and have been watching these videos. They are great tutorials.

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    ranges that will allow to draw from holster....

    So, there are ranges that will allow one to use their holster - do know you will most likely have to join their membership level and go through their safety check (which they may or may not charge extra).

    Some that come to mind are (near Seattle):

    Wade's in Bellevue
    West Coast Armory


    A majority of people that carry (openly or concealed) do not practice enough of the basic skills.

    One really easy way to get round this is to....
    Also if you really want to practice drawing from your holster, shooting and moving, engaging multiple targets with reloads try out IDPA or USPSA (aka IPSC). Matches usually cost $10-$20 with multiple stages. You can usually find one almost any weekend in the Puget Sound area.

    Suggestions are:
    West Coast Armory
    Renton Fish and Game Club
    Norpoint in Arlington
    Black Diamond
    Paul Bunyon in Tacoma
    Kitsap Rifle and Revolver in Bremerton to name a few. All clubs are listed under the search for either shooting sport.

    www.idpa.com
    www.uspsa.com

    If you think you are good or want to improve...... this is the sport to challenge you - whatever your shooting ability (as long as you are safe with firearms).
    Last edited by oldkim; 08-11-2010 at 08:32 PM.

  7. #7
    Regular Member Beretta92FSLady's Avatar
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    I have been giving serious thought to joining the IDPA.
    I don't mind watching the OC-Community (tea party 2.0's, who have hijacked the OC-Community) cannibalize itself. I do mind watching OC dragged through the gutter. OC is an exercise of A Right. I choose to not OC; I choose to not own firearms. I choose to leave the OC-Community to it's own self-inflicted injuries, and eventual implosion. Carry on...

  8. #8
    Regular Member gsx1138's Avatar
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    Honestly I haven't practiced drawing from my Supertuck but I do it with my Serpa all the time. My range KRRC rocks for allowing this. But I've also just started USPSA shooting which drawing is pretty much a requirement. I also recommend reloading drills.

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    If you want to try it out....

    Well, shoot - just shoot me an email and we'll arrange a day to go out and do some basic movements - commands and such to get you comfortable.

    PM and we'll get started.


    You'll need:
    1) At least 300-500 rounds
    2) 3-6+ magazines
    3) Good sturdy holster (one that can withstand multiple reholstering). This may not be your soft carry holster as some really are comfortable but you can't really reholster. Also a good gun belt, if possible.
    4) Eye and Ear protection
    5) range bag / gun case
    6) hate to put this in here but a good working pistol

    Good to have but not mandated:
    1) Magazine pouch

    $45 for me. This includes range fees, targets, instruction of basics (from shooting and IDPA rules/setup).
    Young Kim, NRA Endowment Member
    NRA Certified Instructor (pistol)
    NRA Range Safety Officer

    www.shootonthemove.org

    "Shoot Safetly, Shoot Often and Share Your Sport!"
    Jim Scoutten, Shooting USA

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    Pretty chill range I go to: www.interlakesporting.org

    You can do pretty much what you want at the pistol range (even move and shoot since there are no lanes). It is an outdoor range though.

  11. #11
    Regular Member Genken's Avatar
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    I use snap caps for my draw, immediate action, and reload drills. Think I need to grab a few more packs since I bought that 3rd mag.
    Last edited by Genken; 08-12-2010 at 02:37 AM. Reason: spelling
    It ain't easy in the Tweezy.

    My favorite one to date: "Uh... You know the hammer's back on it, right?"

    Me: o.O "Uh...yeah."

  12. #12
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    Drawing fast and quickly engaging one or several targets can be quite a learning experience. My first exposure was shooting at Sam's on Friday nights, where we shot informal IDPA ahead of the firing line. Occasionally we'd have a timed draw and an aimed double tap or a quick draw and shoot from hip at a very close target. Other times we'd shoot a stand of steel poppers (a lot of fun but a ricochet hazard).

    My best time on the poppers was 1.7 sec to drop all 4 targets from a draw (it did help that they were basically side by side, about 3ft apart). Things I learned: A good paddle holster (no retention) works very well and a soft IWB does not. Whatever you use, become intimately familiar with it. Be very careful to not cross yourself. I was coming close to crossing myself as I was drawing and bringing the weak hand up/over for support.

    Unfortunately you're in King Co. but practicing out in the sticks gives you an opportunity to set up and engage multiple targets in large arcs, something you normally can't do at a range. Just be sure of your backstop and bring a buddy along to observe your technique.

  13. #13
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    i have long been concerned about my ability to draw/aim/shoot quickly and accurately. ive practiced some at home with snap-caps but this doesnt tell me any thing about my ability to shoot accurately. i dont have enough free time these days to get into competition shooting... one of these days maby.

    oldkim, ya offering lessons for competitions or for quick draw shooting? (or both)

    -matt

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    training

    Both. Whichever you need.

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    By quick draw, do you mean drawing quickly and acquiring a target as normal? Or do you mean old west style where you want to barely clear your holster before sending lead down range?

    If you're opting for method two... good for you!

    I say this for two reasons... first is because if you're going to learn the quick draw you should learn to fire quickly too... taking the time to bring the pistol up into a two handed grip kind of defeats the purpose of a quick draw. Being able to "shoot from the hip" reliably could save your life one day. Though the chances of you being involved in a quick-draw-duel are pretty slim...

    The other reason is that it is insanely difficult.

    Being fast from holster to eye line is one thing... being able to draw just far enough to clear your holster (and body) and still land bullets on target... now THAT is skill.

    Though, I highly doubt you'll find any indoor ranges that are keen on letting you practice... and try not to shoot your leg!


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