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Thread: How do you train?

  1. #1
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    How do you train?

    I was woundering what type of training everyone out there does at the range or at home.
    I like to train to come out to the holster and dry fire at home... and at the range its a mix of hammerd pairs, mag changes, threat drills, failure to feed and stopage drills, we load each others magazines and place a dummy round or an empty caseing some where in the magazine so the shooter dosent know when he is going to have a malfunction. we also like to do some sprints and pushups to get our heart rate up, so we can train under stress.... that is the best!!!... you are never gonna be relaxed in a gunfight.

    What do all of you do?

  2. #2
    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    Sounds like you took your marine corps training techniques and applied them to your civilian life. Not many civilians will do this, but it will increase the likely hood that you will survive if your sills are put to the test.

  3. #3
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    I just joined the marine corps ... I don't even go to boot camp until October or November... Lol... But I would recomend for everyone out there to download and listen to the Gunfighter cast podcast. it's run by two marines that are very knowledgeable... If anyone out there need to know how to get these ... Let me know. There free and that's where I got most of my ideas for training...

  4. #4
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    One the wall at Gunsite are two plaques.

    One says "THPG" which means "Two Hits Per Goblin" and the other is more to the point:

    "When you are not practicing, someone else is, and when you meet him, you will LOSE."

  5. #5
    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    Learning to shoot accurately under stress is bay far the most important skill to master. The techniques you mentioned in the OP are a great simulator, but nothing can simulate the stress of having to shoot while someone is shooting back.

    There is nothing wrong with physical conditioning either. it's always good to get your heart rate up, and what you described is not only good marksmanship training it's good all-around physical training too.

  6. #6
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    Another good thing to practice is shooting more then twice. Most of the time your target will not go down after 2 rounds. Since most likely if will be a stress shoot and your odds of getting a CNS shot(only way to instantly incapacitate) are slim to none, i would train to shoot 4-8 rounds as fast as possible center mass.

  7. #7
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    I've taken about 35 hours of professional pistol training over the last 10 years. That's probably all of that I'm going to do for the time being. I dry fire and practice presentations at home. I go to a range or out in the desert to shoot about once a month. I read and re-read my tactical books to keep theory fresh in my mind. I like the Gabe Suarez books.

  8. #8
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    I don't train, I practice.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yard Sale View Post
    I don't train, I practice.
    I understand train to mean learning something new. I understand practice to mean going over what is already known. I try to do both.

  10. #10
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    Practice

    Dry fire while moving. Quick draw + fire (both regular and shooting from the hip for close quarter engagements), Off hand shooting. But the best thing you can do is practice checking your surrounding for danger in the real world. No amount of practice can compensate for bad situational awareness.

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