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Thread: Stephen Colbert's Congressional Testimony

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    Regular Member Jack House's Avatar
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    Stephen Colbert's Congressional Testimony

    Freaking hilarious.

    Last edited by Jack House; 09-24-2010 at 11:10 PM.

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    Don't necessarily agree with the economics but hilarious nevertheless!!

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    What a waste of taxpayer dollars.

    I found him unfunny, as usual.

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    Regular Member fozzy71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eye95 View Post
    What a waste of taxpayer dollars.
    .......
    You say that like you expect your government to actually do things, other than spend your tax money.
    "I like users who quote smellslikemichigan in their signature lines." - fozzy71

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    Regular Member Thos.Jefferson's Avatar
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    It's like something from the Onion
    He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent which will reach to himself. -- Thomas Paine (1737--1809), Dissertation on First Principles of Government, 1795

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    Regular Member flagellum's Avatar
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    I enjoyed it, though it was silly, I think there was of course a serious message to be taken from it. I think whether we need no make our borders more secure or not, we need serious reform in the realm of immigration. Around 4:18
    Last edited by flagellum; 09-25-2010 at 03:21 AM.
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    Regular Member Jack House's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flagellum View Post
    I enjoyed it, though it was silly, I think there was of course a serious message to be taken from it. I think whether we need no make our borders more secure or not, we need serious reform in the realm of immigration. Around 4:18
    Indeed I noticed that too. I liked how he basically made a mockery of the congressmen. Hey clearly watched too much Iron Man 2.

    I personally would like to see the immigration laws relaxed a bit. Not to the point where there is an open boarder, but also not where only the rich and lucky get through. I mean, I don't see an issue with people immigrating if they get a job, maintain their job, are self sufficient and don't break any laws. I would have an issue with people coming here enmasse and trying to change all the laws, committing serious crimes(who cares about jay walking) and/or living off of welfare or something.

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    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack House View Post
    Indeed I noticed that too. I liked how he basically made a mockery of the congressmen. Hey clearly watched too much Iron Man 2.

    I personally would like to see the immigration laws relaxed a bit. Not to the point where there is an open boarder, but also not where only the rich and lucky get through. I mean, I don't see an issue with people immigrating if they get a job, maintain their job, are self sufficient and don't break any laws. I would have an issue with people coming here enmasse and trying to change all the laws, committing serious crimes(who cares about jay walking) and/or living off of welfare or something.

    People are able to immigrate now if "they get a job, maintain their job, are self sufficient and don't break any laws." No relaxing of the laws required to meet these criteria.

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    Regular Member gsx1138's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buster81 View Post
    People are able to immigrate now if "they get a job, maintain their job, are self sufficient and don't break any laws." No relaxing of the laws required to meet these criteria.
    The immigration laws in this country are a red tape nightmare. Reform is needed. The entire process needs to be simplified and not contingent on who has the most money.

    I thought the bit was semi-funny and I heard all the outrage from Hannity and the rest. Which they'll be outraged about anything a Liberal does. While being a waste of taxpayer money it's sad that a comedian in character makes more sense than the asshats sitting in front of him.
    Last edited by gsx1138; 09-26-2010 at 02:49 AM.

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    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsx1138 View Post
    The immigration laws in this country are a red tape nightmare. Reform is needed. The entire process needs to be simplified and not contingent on who has the most money.

    Have you been through the immigration process to legally enter the US?

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    Regular Member gsx1138's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buster81 View Post
    Have you been through the immigration process to legally enter the US?
    No. But I have a friend who has. She had a job, and lived here. It took years to cut through the bullsh!t to get her citizenship.

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    Good. Citizenship should be hard to earn for folks raised outside of the US.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gsx1138 View Post
    No. But I have a friend who has. She had a job, and lived here. It took years to cut through the bullsh!t to get her citizenship.
    Citizenship and legal immigration are two different steps in the process. You're saying you want to reform the immigration process because its too difficult to get citizenship? Thats a different argument.

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    Star Power!
    Last edited by aadvark; 09-26-2010 at 03:25 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gsx1138 View Post
    No. But I have a friend who has. She had a job, and lived here. It took years to cut through the bullsh!t to get her citizenship.
    I guess you got me beat then. I immigrated myself and didn't have a problem with either the immigration, or the citizenship process. And no, I don't have "the most money" as has been suggested is a criteria.

    Which part did your friend find to be the most like "bullsh!t" and if years is too long, how long should it take?
    Last edited by buster81; 09-26-2010 at 07:22 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by buster81 View Post
    I guess you got me beat then. I immigrated myself and didn't have a problem with either the immigration, or the citizenship process. And no, I don't have "the most money" as has been suggested is a criteria.

    Which part did your friend find to be the most like "bullsh!t" and if years is too long, how long should it take?
    Where did you emigrate from?
    Last edited by Tawnos; 09-27-2010 at 12:29 AM.
    "If we were to ever consider citizenship as the least bit matter of merit instead of birthright, imagine who should be selected as deserved representation of our democracy: someone who would risk their daily livelihood to cast an individually statistically insignificant vote, or those who wrap themselves in the flag against slightest slights." - agenthex

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    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Much discussion is not happening on the innertubez about the Colbert testimony reportage being used to overshadow the Coates testimony. A few pundits have weighed in with speculation.

    In either case the money quote is probably "there is a law against contempt of Congress, but not contempt for Congress."

    stay safe.

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    The word "citizen" these days is bull$#!+. A citizen is someone who takes an active part in the protection, and prosperity of their community. A citizen takes personal responsibility for maintaining the integrity of their nation, and upholding not only it's laws but also it's traditions and core values. Just being born here should not make you a citizen, a legal resident, but not a citizen. Why do we allow people to vote who have no interest in actually understanding the system? These people simply vote in whoever gives them icecream and welfare checks. The word citizen is a joke today. It used to mean something real. Now all it means is so called "entitlements".
    This site has been hijacked by leftists who attack opposition to further their own ends. Those who have never served this country and attack those who do are no longer worthy of my time or attention.

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    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    I respectfully disagree.

    "Citizen" in/of the USA means someone legally entitled to vote in the elections of this country. There is no law requiring the citizen to know what s/he is doimg by casting their vote.

    We may wish there was such a law. But I for one fear what that would mean and result in.

    stay safe.

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    I'd go for a poll tax per item:

    1$ for one vote
    100$ for 2nd vote
    10,000$ for 3rd vote
    100,000$ for 4th vote
    10,000,000$ for 5th vote
    1B$ for 6th vote

    If your candidate looses you get yer money back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NRAMARINE View Post
    The word "citizen" these days is bull$#!+. A citizen is someone who takes an active part in the protection, and prosperity of their community. A citizen takes personal responsibility for maintaining the integrity of their nation, and upholding not only it's laws but also it's traditions and core values. Just being born here should not make you a citizen, a legal resident, but not a citizen. Why do we allow people to vote who have no interest in actually understanding the system? These people simply vote in whoever gives them icecream and welfare checks. The word citizen is a joke today. It used to mean something real. Now all it means is so called "entitlements".
    I totally agree with this statement.

    I came to the United States when I was 18 months old in 1967 and have lived here in Colorado since then.
    I finally decided to get my US citizenship a few years back because I was tired of all the political BS that seemed to be rearing its ugly head...more so than in years past.
    It took me a total of 10 months to go from sending in the application along with the fees to getting sworn in and handing in my 'green card' for a US Naturalization one. It was one of the best days of my life.
    The main reason was because I wanted to vote.
    I was finally angry enough with the current political arena in DC to get off my ass and do it.
    I did all my schooling here in CO, went to college here in CO and started working when I was 15 while finishing school.
    Although I have not have had the privilege of serving in the Armed Forces, I consider myself a true patriot.
    Someone who loves his country and would do anything to protect it, including giving his life.
    I believe that the system we have in place for US citizenship is way too easy.
    Wait X amount of years, get married to someone and wait X amount of years, take an extremely easy test, write something like 'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog' on a piece of paper and you're done......
    As long as you're not a total tool, you're pretty much in.

    Ok, I am off of my soap box....for the moment.

    Stay safe everyone, and NEVER give up.....EVER.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NRAMARINE View Post
    The word "citizen" these days is bull$#!+. A citizen is someone who takes an active part in the protection, and prosperity of their community. A citizen takes personal responsibility for maintaining the integrity of their nation, and upholding not only it's laws but also it's traditions and core values.
    I don't know - it sure seems like you've watched Starship Troopers one too many times, if you really think that's how you define what a "citizen" is. In the film, they define the word "citizen" basically the same way that you did. Of course, the whole point of the film was that their society was a fascist one (the underlying theme is basically "what would happen if a group like the Nazis had won and fascism had taken over.")

    Quote Originally Posted by NRAMARINE
    Just being born here should not make you a citizen, a legal resident, but not a citizen.
    Take it up with the founding fathers. Imposing arbitrary rules in order to dictate who gets to vote and who does not is a slippery slope. I wonder how gung-ho you would be about the idea if the criteria they set forth meant that you could no longer vote...

    But of course, the people who suggest these sorts of changes never consider that when spouting off about how people who disagree with them (or don't meet their arbitrary criteria) shouldn't be allowed to vote.
    Quote Originally Posted by NRAMARINE
    Why do we allow people to vote who have no interest in actually understanding the system?
    Because it's in the constitution? As we like to point out to those who disregard our 2nd Amendment rights, the constitution is not a salad bar that you can can pick and choose from, accepting only the parts that we like/agree with.
    Last edited by LV XD9; 09-28-2010 at 12:20 PM.

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    Let's see, I don't think being fluent in the english language ( which all the ballots are in by the way) is arbitrary. Nor do I believe that asking someone to be able to hold a grasp of our system, that can be obtained in a highschool civics class, before they are allowed to make decisions that affect us all is arbitrary either. If you can pass the way too easy citizenship class, you already know more than the average democratic voter. Name the three branches of govt, explain briefly their responsibilities, and understand how the legislative process works. As for the constitution, here's a crazy idea......teach it in schools, and test them on it. Read the darn thing sometime, it's not too much to ask. Most people could probably read and understand it in the time it takes to read this blog. I say again a citizen takes personal responsibility for their community and nation. How can you do that if you have zero liability? If you have no skin in the game, you don't get to raise the stakes.

    I served with an immigrant from Cuba. He floated over, went through all the BS, got his citizenship. The same day he walked into a recruiter's office and signed up. The ink was still wet on his paperwork. When his family asked him why he told them " This country gave us freedom, now I will do my part to ensure that freedom is still here for others willing to pay the price for it." That's a citizen. And a man I am proud to know and call my friend. He is currently serving in Afghanistan as a scout sniper in the USMC.

    Ps "Starship Troopers" ? Never saw it. I am referring to the historical meaning of the word citizen. Y'know, Rome, Greece, USA pre 1900. Also the age to vote IMHO should be raised. Simply because as a society we tend to spoil our kids and they mature slower. Again, they don't understand responsibility, so they vote with their emotions and not their heads.
    This site has been hijacked by leftists who attack opposition to further their own ends. Those who have never served this country and attack those who do are no longer worthy of my time or attention.

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    Quote Originally Posted by luv_jeeps View Post
    I totally agree with this statement.

    I came to the United States when I was 18 months old in 1967 and have lived here in Colorado since then.
    I finally decided to get my US citizenship a few years back because I was tired of all the political BS that seemed to be rearing its ugly head...more so than in years past.
    It took me a total of 10 months to go from sending in the application along with the fees to getting sworn in and handing in my 'green card' for a US Naturalization one. It was one of the best days of my life.
    The main reason was because I wanted to vote.
    I was finally angry enough with the current political arena in DC to get off my ass and do it.
    I did all my schooling here in CO, went to college here in CO and started working when I was 15 while finishing school.
    Although I have not have had the privilege of serving in the Armed Forces, I consider myself a true patriot.
    Someone who loves his country and would do anything to protect it, including giving his life.
    I believe that the system we have in place for US citizenship is way too easy.
    Wait X amount of years, get married to someone and wait X amount of years, take an extremely easy test, write something like 'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog' on a piece of paper and you're done......
    As long as you're not a total tool, you're pretty much in.

    Ok, I am off of my soap box....for the moment.

    Stay safe everyone, and NEVER give up.....EVER.
    Glad to have you on board. Where did your parents immigrate from? My great great grand parents came over from Ireland just after the civil war.
    This site has been hijacked by leftists who attack opposition to further their own ends. Those who have never served this country and attack those who do are no longer worthy of my time or attention.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NRAMARINE View Post
    Let's see, I don't think being fluent in the english language ( which all the ballots are in by the way) is arbitrary. Nor do I believe that asking someone to be able to hold a grasp of our system, that can be obtained in a highschool civics class, before they are allowed to make decisions that affect us all is arbitrary either.
    Then you clearly don't understand the document that you supposedly swore to defend. You don't get to decide who does and does not get to vote, nor do you get to decide who is considered a "citizen" as opposed to a "legal resident." The right to vote is granted to all US citizens who are of age (with some exceptions, of course, which I don't necessarily agree with.)

    The fact of the matter is, a stupid person's vote counts just as much as an intelligent person's does. The dirt-poor person living in the sticks's vote counts just as much as the rich person living in a big city's vote does. This is how the founding fathers wanted it and that is how it is. No amount of vitriol or whining will change that. You may not agree with it, but then again, that really doesn't matter. Again, the Constitution is not a salad bar that you can pick and choose from.

    Choosing who gets to enjoy the right to vote based on arbitrary (yes, arbitrary) criteria (like whether or not they've served in the military, or whether or not they agree with your political ideals, or even whether or not they speak fluent English) is un-American and goes against everything our founding fathers fought for. A natural born citizen is just that, regardless of what you think or want.

    I'm not intereted in getting into a heated back-and-forth with someone who clearly picks and chooses what parts of the Constitution he thinks should be adhered to, so I will leave it to you to have the last word, just as I would with an anti-2nd Amendment poster.
    Last edited by LV XD9; 09-28-2010 at 04:52 PM.

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