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Thread: FAQ's from DoJ web site Wilenet concerning LEOSA act.

  1. #1
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    FAQ's from DoJ web site Wilenet concerning LEOSA act.


  2. #2
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    Thanks. Very interesting. I note the absence of citations to Wisconsin State Statutes, that are mentioned only.

    The law abides only the law abiding. WITS, the law delays only those deterred by the law.

  3. #3
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    And what is the point?

  4. #4
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    Preemption.

    It's OK, evidently, for the State of Wisconsin to preempt ordinance, but not for the State, America, to preempt Wisconsin.
    Last edited by Doug Huffman; 10-13-2010 at 09:45 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Huffman View Post
    Preemption.

    It's OK, evidently, for the State of Wisconsin to preempt ordinance, but not for the State, America, to preempt Wisconsin.
    Well federal law still super cedes state laws

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    Please, gently, will you provide a citation to the basis, in law, for the general point, that "federal law supersedes state law"? It seems, then, that the union of sovereign states united is dead of a tyrant nation, the Obamanation.

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    Tenth Amenment
    The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

    The U.S. Constitution establishes a government based on "federalism," or the sharing of power between the national, and state (and local) governments. Our power-sharing form of government is the opposite of "centralized" governments, such as those in England and France, under which national government maintains total power.
    While each of the 50 states has its own constitution, all provisions of state constitutions must comply with the U.S. Constitution. For example, a state constitution cannot deny accused criminals the right to a trial by jury, as assured by the U.S. Constitution's 6th Amendment.

    Under the U.S. Constitution, both the national and state governments are granted certain exclusive powers and share other powers.

    Exclusive Powers of the National Government

    Under the Constitution, powers reserved to the national government include:


    Print money (bills and coins)

    Declare war

    Establish an army and navy

    Enter into treaties with foreign governments

    Regulate commerce between states and international trade

    Establish post offices and issue postage

    Make laws necessary to enforce the Constitution
    Exclusive Powers of State Governments

    Powers reserved to state governments include:


    Establish local governments

    Issue licenses (driver, hunting, marriage, etc.)

    Regulate intrastate (within the state) commerce

    Conduct elections

    Ratify amendments to the U.S. Constitution

    Provide for public health and safety

    Exercise powers neither delegated to the national government or prohibited from the states by the U.S.
    Constitution (For example, setting legal drinking and smoking ages.)
    Powers Shared by National and State Government

    Shared, or "concurrent" powers include:


    Setting up courts

    Creating and collecting taxes

    Building highways

    Borrowing money

    Making and enforcing laws

    Chartering banks and corporations

    Spending money for the betterment of the general welfare

    Taking (condemning) private property with just compensation

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