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Thread: Indian Res.

  1. #1
    Regular Member jimd_21's Avatar
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    Indian Res.

    Does anyone know the laws concerning carrying open or concealed on reservations in Idaho...specifically Fort Hall?

  2. #2
    Regular Member oldbanger's Avatar
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    this is 2002 !

    [Title 25 CFR 11.444]
    [Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition) - April 1, 2002 Edition]
    [Title 25 - INDIANS]
    [Chapter I - BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR]
    [Subchapter B - LAW AND ORDER]
    [Part 11 - LAW AND ORDER ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS]
    [Subpart D - Criminal Offenses]
    [Sec. 11.444 - Carrying concealed weapons.]
    [From the U.S. Government Printing Office]


    25INDIANS12002-04-012002-04-01false11.444Sec. 11.444INDIANS BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER LAW AND ORDER ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS Criminal Offenses
    Sec. 11.444 Carrying concealed weapons.

    A person who goes about in public places armed with a dangerous
    weapon concealed upon his or her person is guilty of a misdemeanor
    unless he or she has a permit to do so signed by a magistrate of the
    Court of Indian Offenses.

    http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-200...-sec11-444.htm

  3. #3
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    Bear in mind that the tribes themselves can pass laws on the reservation. I'm pretty sure that they can't enforce tribal laws against non-tribe members, but at the very least they could trespass you from the reservation and maybe even confiscate (read: steal) your firearm.

  4. #4
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    They can make and attempt to enforce their own laws and they will try to go after non-tribal members. This along with a bunch of stuff I have been learning from a tribal member I work with are more good reasons to get rid of the reservations...

  5. #5
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    I never really did understand how someone who is an "American citizen" can also be a member of a different "sovereign" nation, subject to certain laws on the reservation and exempt from others off of it (collecting eagle feathers, marine mammal ivory, etc.). Seems pretty un-American if you ask me.

    The way I see it, all the reservation tribes should be given a choice: either be a truly sovereign nation (i.e. legally and economically independent from the federal government, passports/visas needed to come off the reservation, import/export duties, etc.), or dissolve the reservation and be held to the same laws and have the same benefits as any other American citizen.

    Yes, I know that the indigenous Americans had a raw deal back in the day (and arguably even today), but such is the nature of the world and its history. Stronger, more numerous, and more technologically advanced cultures have always conquered and assimilated or annihilated weaker groups of people. Thankfully, as a species, we tend to do that less frequently now (at least by military means), but how long must we make amends for history that no one alive today had anything to do with?

    Besides, if one wants to see socialism/collectivism in action, he needn't look further than the American Indian reservations. Centrally planned and directed economies, individualism suppressed for "the good of the group," etc., etc., etc...

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