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Thread: Pistol Lanyard while OC?

  1. #1
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    Pistol Lanyard while OC?

    Has anyone ever considered it? Lets have a discussion about possible pros and cons. Ive never heard of anyone using one but just thought of the idea earlier. I was thinking that using one with a retention holster could be OK, but was curious about others opinions on this. any ideas?
    I like GUNS

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    Regular Member Hendu024's Avatar
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    Do you mean a cable or line attached to the pistol and then attached to you somewhere? ie the holster or your belt?

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    I like GUNS

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    On active duty I always used a lanyard with my 1911A1, but there was a eye on the butt to attach the lanyard swivel hook. My Taurus .45 does not have any convenient place to attach a lanyard.

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    Regular Member SFCRetired's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCglock1988 View Post
    I looked at that and the thought struck me that it is something to get tangled up at the wrong time and that could, at the same time, be used as a weapon against you. I've got a good retention holster and that, plus my training, is as far as I am willing to go.

    There may be situations that I haven't considered where such a device would be handy, but I just don't see them yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by youngck View Post
    On active duty I always used a lanyard with my 1911A1, but there was a eye on the butt to attach the lanyard swivel hook. My Taurus .45 does not have any convenient place to attach a lanyard.
    so you never had any problems with it? as far as it getting in the way etc..
    I like GUNS

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    Regular Member cbpeck's Avatar
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    Too Tacticool

    I think a lanyard is too "tacticool" for me. I fail to see the advantage, so it feels just like any other unnecessary accessory that someone's marketing just to make a buck. Maybe they have a purpose in combat environments where you may have to jump, dive, crawl, etc, but that's not my life. Even if my carry guns had loops, which they don't, I wouldn't use one.

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    That would look great with my leather wallet with chain.

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    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogeater f6 View Post
    That would look great with my leather wallet with chain.
    if I remember correctly, chain wallets are #37 on the list of 100 things that make you un-date-able.

  10. #10
    Regular Member Sc0tt's Avatar
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    These are great given the right circumstances. Airborne rangers at the 101st use them becuase the last thing you want to happen as you reppell out of a helo is watch your weapon fall to the ground. They are allso used bu USAR when hiking through rough terian, officers on trains where they are in close quarters to other individuals.


    Heres what they do not much do for you. Your sespitibility for an unauthorized holster draw depends slightly on the type of holster you use when you OC and mostly on your situational awareness. Using guarding techniches so when you feel someone approaching you in a manner you can not see then and am not sure about thier attentions not garbing you holster but using one arm to cover the area of the holster and goto a state of heightened awerness. There are ebough slack on these devices typically that if some lunitick were to unholster your weapon he/she chould not only hold you at gun point but shoot you and use the remaining amo to shoot at everyone around you.
    -----------------
    --SCOTT

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    "A government that is big enough to give you everything you need is beg enough to take everything you have, the course of history shows that as government incresses - liberty decreases."


    LEGAL NOTICE: I am not a lawyer, no content in the above post should considered legal advice

  11. #11
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    Personally, I think that an appropriately designed and utilized RETENTION holster would be more effective, have more "pro's" and fewer "con's" associated with it.

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    If you have the bucks to spare and a provision for it on your weapon, I suggest it, if for no other reason, simply retention. That being said, I've never worn a lanyard and don't own one. Of course, you're unlikely to have anyone sucessfully grab from a retention holster with a lanyard. Unfortunately that won't be stylish. And it also means that if you do have an attempt at a grab, they won't be able to get the gun very far from you and you will be in a dangerous place, fighting to regain control of your weapon.
    It takes a village to raise an idiot.

  13. #13
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    This might sound a bit odd from an instructor that prefers firearm retention training, but lanyards are BAD. Let me explain my personal experience over my 1st combat deployment.

    Lanyards were to be attached to the Beretta M9 as well as our belt. Unfortunately, this meant that if the pistol were ever let go of by accident or struggle that it would wind up muzzle first in the dirt with a live round chambered or worse if the lanyard was not adjusted accordingly.

    That meant that once it was let go of, you had to bend down and pick it up or "go fishing" using your lanyard to pull it up (not a good idea). To overcome this, our MP's attached the lanyard to the shoulder strap of our IBA and adjusted the length so it would fall just below or right at holster level. All fine and dandy right? Wrong!

    While working one of the entry control points I had 2 separate incidents. The first involved the lanyard. A local national tried to get my attention as I was trying to direct a fuel truck on where to go and refused to back up. He wound up grabbing my lanyard to spin me around and talk to me, the result was that local national being put on the ground rather quickly. It took almost 30 minutes for the translator to explain to him what he had done and what could have been the result. I immediately took the lanyard off and ordered the rest of my team to do the same.

    The 2nd incident involved another local national that managed to sneak behind me from another truck and bumped into my firearm side quite hard with his hand directly over my holster. This one was put on the ground with a wrist-turn technique and I had the translator tell him that he could have been shot for what he had just done as I had no way to know that he wasn't after my pistol. Had a lanyard been there it would have made my response more difficult as it would have tied his hand and arm up in the lanyard as I turned to respond.

    My team was fortunate enough to never have to fire any of our weapons in self-defense on that deployment.

    One of the other teams had a lanyard issue in that their gunner was trying to get into the shell of the hummer to get away from an IED detonation and the lanyard wound up hanging up on the turret. Fortunately the lanyard clasp broke under his weight. It could have easily kept him exposed and resulted in an injury or worse.

    So my thought is that lanyards are bad, though they serve a purpose when needed...like entry teams and sweep/clear teams. But consider something else. If you're training to use your firearm with both hands and your lanyard is set up for just one hand, how do you transition to the other hand and maintain the ability to use it as an impact weapon should you be left with no other options? Shootings are likely to be up close and personal, fast, low light or no light environment, violent, and will require multiple shots to stop a threat.
    Last edited by REALteach4u; 11-30-2010 at 01:36 PM.

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