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Thread: My College Research Papers

  1. #1
    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    My College Research Papers

    Some of you may remember that I recently posted a link to a survey that I used to collect data for a college research paper. Many asked that I post the finished work. Well, Now the semester is over and and I have my grade, so I'll post the papers. I have omitted my name as well as the professor's name from the headings. These papers were written in accordance with the MLA 2009 conventions. They both received an "A" grade and, yes, I blew the curve for the rest of the class. These files are saved in .docx format.

    A Cop Is Too Heavy (Final Paper)

    Unarmed Students Make Easy Prey (Midterm Paper)

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    Regular Member OldCurlyWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada carrier View Post
    Some of you may remember that I recently posted a link to a survey that I used to collect data for a college research paper. Many asked that I post the finished work. Well, Now the semester is over and and I have my grade, so I'll post the papers. I have omitted my name as well as the professor's name from the headings. These papers were written in accordance with the MLA 2009 conventions. They both received an "A" grade and, yes, I blew the curve for the rest of the class. These files are saved in .docx format.

    A Cop Is Too Heavy (Final Paper)

    Unarmed Students Make Easy Prey (Midterm Paper)
    I really like the titles.

    It would reach a larger audience if the papers were in an older format such as .doc or .rtf. I happen to have access to 2007 but my personal computers do not have it. They have 2003 and WordPad, which will not read .docx files.
    Last edited by OldCurlyWolf; 12-23-2010 at 02:26 AM.
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    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    I put them in Google docs and made them readable to the public.

    Here are the links

    A Cop Is Too Heavy

    Unarmed Students Make Easy Prey
    Last edited by Nevada carrier; 12-23-2010 at 03:36 AM.

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    Regular Member OldCurlyWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada carrier View Post
    I put them in Google docs and made them readable to the public.

    Here are the links

    A Cop Is Too Heavy

    Unarmed Students Make Easy Prey

    They are both good, but the final is much better than the midterm. Part is due to the subject matter and part is obvious improvement on your part.



    My sister is a HS English and English Literature teacher. I wonder what grade she would give.

    I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do those things to other people and I require the same of them.

    Politicians should serve two terms, one in office and one in prison.(borrowed from RioKid)

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    Very good work

    Very nice papers. Your second paper is particularly good, and I think the addition of your own experiences really drives your point home.

    On the first paper, however, I had acouple points. Please don't take these as criticism, I mean them more as dialogue, and I look forward to your response.

    First, you didn't do a good job removing your name from the paper. The citations reveal your full name. If you're trying to avoid revealing identities, you should remove the name of the professor you interviewed, as well, unless he agreed for you to release his name with his opinion on the Internet at large. I think everyone would be most unhappy if it somehow came back to haunt him, or someone managed to use it against him. I know academic circles can be more political than Washington, DC at times.

    Second, I caught the use of the word "illicit" when you meant "elicit". Illicit means illegal, immoral, or to be avoided. We know that guns are none of these things. Elicit means to bring to light or bring out.

    Third and most importantly, I strongly disagree with your suggestion that it is a "reasonable restriction" to remove a student's right to carry on campus for violations of school policy or poor grades. Consider that some schools, especially religious schools, have requirements like attendance at religious services and absolute respect for campus authority figures as a religious duty, with broad discretionary powers given to these authority figures. So a student could lose the right to carry for failure to go to chapel, or for speaking disrespectfully toward a Resident Assistant or administrator. Or, for that matter, doing anything that such an authority figure disapproves of, be it chewing gum or crossing one's legs, even if these things are permitted to others. School rules can prohibit or require nearly anything save violations of basic human rights, so pegging a basic human right to those school rules makes the exercise of the right arbitrary and capricious. It would be equivalent to giving up your right to choose sexual partners or speak as you wish or move about as a free person merely because you violate any school rule. The right to keep and bear arms is a right equivalent to any of these, and as inalienable as any of these.

    Furthermore, to link that right to a student's grades is likewise unacceptable. I personally know a college graduate who had a very bad semester. His roomate threatened him with physical harm and every kind of harassment for the entire semester, finishing off just before finals by actually beating him. In that State with poor self-defense laws, and because of a few unwise words, he himself was arrested for his own beating, and furthermore prohibited from accessing the school for a time. The school took a poor view of self-defense, which didn't help one bit. Naturally, his grades were quite poor that semester, though he had managed to keep them up during the bulk of the term he missed many of his final exams and neglected to finish his final papers. The charges were thrown out of court, even in that legally backward State, and he was admitted back to the school for the next semester, provided that he stay away from his former roomate, which he didn't consider a problem. He made the smart choice to switch schools, but had he continued to attend the first school, he would have been left without the means to defend himself at school because his grades and behavior in defending himself rather than simply kowtowing to the bully would disenfranchise him of those rights, just like a felon, though he actually committed no crime.

    Do you see the potential problems which stem from allowing a right to be conditionally infringed upon? This is, of course, all presuming that students first be permitted to exercise their right to carry on campus in the first place. Hopefully this will happen soon, and hopefully your paper will sway a few minds toward that goal, perhaps your professor if he or she is not already inclined toward allowing it.

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    Regular Member Brimstone Baritone's Avatar
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    I thought the mid-term was a good read. I will save the final for tomorrow.

    I still have issue with the second survey question. I answered 'slightly unsafe' because I had originally assumed the number to be higher. This led me to believe that fewer people than I thought were able to protect themselves, thus indirectly increasing the risk to me.

    Other than that, you dun good.

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    I read 'em both. Very nice!
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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    Regular Member MKEgal's Avatar
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    The affirmative duty to protect arises not from the State's knowledge of the individuals predicament or from its expressions of intent to help him, but from the limitations which it has imposed on his freedom to act on his own behalf, through imprisonment, institutionalization, or other similar restraint of personal liberty. (DeShaney v. Winnebago County Department of Social Services)
    So when the government prevents us from being able effectively to defend ourselves (GFSZ, PO, in some states any public building), they take responsibility for our protection, and if we are injured in a carry-prohibited area then the gov't is at fault and can be held accountable.


    BTW, several places in "A Cop" you use DeShaney v. Winnebato County Department of Social Services. The county is Winnebago.
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    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MKEgal View Post
    So when the government prevents us from being able effectively to defend ourselves (GFSZ, PO, in some states any public building), they take responsibility for our protection, and if we are injured in a carry-prohibited area then the gov't is at fault and can be held accountable.
    No, they get to have their cake and eat it too. That is, they get to obstruct your liberty by barring the exercise of the second amendment, AND they get to be held blameless if you die as a result. It's wrong, but so long as the courts are inconsistent on this matter, it will remain this way for the time being.


    Quote Originally Posted by MKEgal View Post
    BTW, several places in "A Cop" you use DeShaney v. Winnebato County Department of Social Services. The county is Winnebago.
    Sorry for that, The copy of the case I got my hands on had a typo and I kept perpetuating their mistake. Thank you for bringing that to my attention, it has been corrected.
    Last edited by Nevada carrier; 12-24-2010 at 09:18 AM.

  10. #10
    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny W View Post
    Very nice papers. Your second paper is particularly good, and I think the addition of your own experiences really drives your point home.

    On the first paper, however, I had acouple points. Please don't take these as criticism, I mean them more as dialogue, and I look forward to your response.

    First, you didn't do a good job removing your name from the paper. The citations reveal your full name. If you're trying to avoid revealing identities, you should remove the name of the professor you interviewed, as well, unless he agreed for you to release his name with his opinion on the Internet at large. I think everyone would be most unhappy if it somehow came back to haunt him, or someone managed to use it against him. I know academic circles can be more political than Washington, DC at times.

    Second, I caught the use of the word "illicit" when you meant "elicit". Illicit means illegal, immoral, or to be avoided. We know that guns are none of these things. Elicit means to bring to light or bring out.

    Third and most importantly, I strongly disagree with your suggestion that it is a "reasonable restriction" to remove a student's right to carry on campus for violations of school policy or poor grades. Consider that some schools, especially religious schools, have requirements like attendance at religious services and absolute respect for campus authority figures as a religious duty, with broad discretionary powers given to these authority figures. So a student could lose the right to carry for failure to go to chapel, or for speaking disrespectfully toward a Resident Assistant or administrator. Or, for that matter, doing anything that such an authority figure disapproves of, be it chewing gum or crossing one's legs, even if these things are permitted to others. School rules can prohibit or require nearly anything save violations of basic human rights, so pegging a basic human right to those school rules makes the exercise of the right arbitrary and capricious. It would be equivalent to giving up your right to choose sexual partners or speak as you wish or move about as a free person merely because you violate any school rule. The right to keep and bear arms is a right equivalent to any of these, and as inalienable as any of these.

    Furthermore, to link that right to a student's grades is likewise unacceptable. I personally know a college graduate who had a very bad semester. His roomate threatened him with physical harm and every kind of harassment for the entire semester, finishing off just before finals by actually beating him. In that State with poor self-defense laws, and because of a few unwise words, he himself was arrested for his own beating, and furthermore prohibited from accessing the school for a time. The school took a poor view of self-defense, which didn't help one bit. Naturally, his grades were quite poor that semester, though he had managed to keep them up during the bulk of the term he missed many of his final exams and neglected to finish his final papers. The charges were thrown out of court, even in that legally backward State, and he was admitted back to the school for the next semester, provided that he stay away from his former roomate, which he didn't consider a problem. He made the smart choice to switch schools, but had he continued to attend the first school, he would have been left without the means to defend himself at school because his grades and behavior in defending himself rather than simply kowtowing to the bully would disenfranchise him of those rights, just like a felon, though he actually committed no crime.

    Do you see the potential problems which stem from allowing a right to be conditionally infringed upon? This is, of course, all presuming that students first be permitted to exercise their right to carry on campus in the first place. Hopefully this will happen soon, and hopefully your paper will sway a few minds toward that goal, perhaps your professor if he or she is not already inclined toward allowing it.
    Determining reasonable restriction is a difficult task, I understand your points, and I refuse to dismiss your objections simply because you disagree with what I've said. What's important is that the dialog is taking place and that the more it's discussed the easier it will be for me to go before the college administrators and lobby for the cause. Before that takes place, the vast majority of the gun rights community must be on the same sheet of music, we can not expect to be taken seriously by these institutions if we, ourselves are not in agreement.

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