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Thread: If Utah can do it, so should we.

  1. #1
    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    If Utah can do it, so should we.

    Many of you likely know and all of you should that Utah will soon vote for their "State firearm," the Browning M1911. I propose we do the same here in Nevada, though as much as I love the 1911, I believe we should choose something a little more exciting. If Nevada were to adopt one firearm to be the state firearm of Vevada, which would you like to see chosen?

    My vote is for the AR-15. I believe this firearm and not the M4 or M16 should be chosen because it is a civilian rifle not a military rifle. I also believe if the "state firearm of Nevada" were to be given an image to represent it, it should be aimed at California.
    Last edited by Nevada carrier; 01-29-2011 at 10:14 AM.

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    Utah picked the M1911 because it is the most ubiquitous firearm to have been designed in Utah.

    The Armalite is the most ubiquitous firearm to have been designed in California, thus should be the Official Firearm of California.

    What guns were designed in Nevada?

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    .. nevermind, Calicos I guess came out in California.
    Last edited by Felid`Maximus; 01-29-2011 at 01:26 PM.

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    My vote would be for my favorite OC weapon. A Ruger .44 Special Blackhawk with the Bisley grips and frame. It is a great carry gun. It is light enough to be comfortable yet heavy enuf to minimize the recoil when it is fired. With a 5.5" bbl and the handsome wooden grips and carried in a decent western syled leather holster on a gunbelt with 40 cartridge loops full of bright and shiney rounds it makes a statement for OC.

    This is honking big gun and looks like it means business. Combine that with the leather and the loaded cartridge loops and it never fails to get second looks in stores and on the street.

    As Nevada is an OC state the cops cannot even think that this weapon is a concealed weapon.

    However I will caution you when inside the Paiute Indian Tobacco store they pretty much have a cow every time I go there. Their Tribal Police are NOT informed as to state law regarding firearms and they think they can make up the rules as they go along.

    I was stopped once outside the store after making my purchases and hassled for a time by a Tribal Police Sergeant and his rookie Barney Fife. The Sergeant did not know that you could carry openly in Nevada and wanted to confiscate my gun and give me a ticket. I called 911 and got a real cop from Metro there in about 5 minutes.

    He explained the OC law to the Tribal Police and I was on my way very quickly.

    You cannot fix stupid.

  5. #5
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    My vote is for one like that in the capitol building. Revolver, but cannot recall the specifics.
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash Corrigan View Post
    However I will caution you when inside the Paiute Indian Tobacco store they pretty much have a cow every time I go there. Their Tribal Police are NOT informed as to state law regarding firearms and they think they can make up the rules as they go along.

    I was stopped once outside the store after making my purchases and hassled for a time by a Tribal Police Sergeant and his rookie Barney Fife. The Sergeant did not know that you could carry openly in Nevada and wanted to confiscate my gun and give me a ticket. I called 911 and got a real cop from Metro there in about 5 minutes.

    He explained the OC law to the Tribal Police and I was on my way very quickly.

    You cannot fix stupid.
    I'd be very careful on the reservation. I don't think (though definitely could be wrong) that they are required in any way to conform with State or even many Federal laws. My understanding is that the reservations are essentially nearly sovereign nations.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmijackso View Post
    I'd be very careful on the reservation. I don't think (though definitely could be wrong) that they are required in any way to conform with State or even many Federal laws. My understanding is that the reservations are essentially nearly sovereign nations.
    From a reliable source:
    There appears to be a lot of misinformation out there concerning CCW carry on the Reno Sparks Indian Colony. I personally wrote to the Chief of Police, RSIC, Lawrence Cooley, and posed the questions. I informed him I intented to disseminate his response to our CCW classes. Here is his response. Most of you, other than Native Americans, will be pleased:
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Subject: RE: RSIC Policy on Legal Concealed Carry

    Mr. xxxxx,

    I apologize for failing to respond I remember your letter and had
    intended to respond but somehow forgot. On Indian Reservations in Nevada there are three applicable legislative sources that apply; Tribal Law which can only be applied to Indians who are enrolled in, or eligible to
    be enrolled in a federally recognized tribe, State Law which is applied
    to non-Indians, and Federal Law which is applied to both Indians and
    non-Indians but only for violations of the Major Crimes Act.

    To answer your question it depends on the race of the individual
    carrying the concealed weapon.

    If the person is non-Indian he is accountable to state law. Therefore,
    if a non-Indian is carrying a concealed weapon in compliance with state
    law it is legal even on the reservation.

    If the person is Indian it is more complicated. Each reservation has its
    own set of Tribal Laws. Ours for example, has no provision to issue
    concealed weapons permits. If a person who was Indian was carrying a
    concealed weapon on our reservation, even with a permit from the state,
    it would be illegal. Other reservations may issue permits but for an
    Indian person they would have to check the laws on each reservation that
    they plan to carry the concealed weapon.

    Sometimes the laws governing Indian Reservations can be confusing, but
    hopefully this gives you a basic understanding. I am glad that you are
    including information about Tribal Law in your class. This subject is
    often overlooked. If you need any other information please feel free to
    ask.

    Chief Cooley
    That content is from CoP, Reno Sparks Indian Colony. Carry on!
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin

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    Quote Originally Posted by wrightme View Post
    From a reliable source:
    ...

    That content is from CoP, Reno Sparks Indian Colony. Carry on!
    Well that is certainly educating. I was unaware that Tribal Law didn't apply to the land, but to the people.

    However... couldn't the land be considered private property? If so, they would be free to enforce a no weapons policy by trespassing the carrier.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmijackso View Post
    Well that is certainly educating. I was unaware that Tribal Law didn't apply to the land, but to the people.

    However... couldn't the land be considered private property? If so, they would be free to enforce a no weapons policy by trespassing the carrier.
    Any property that is determined to be private is that way. The big question I see is whether that land is private property, or tribal land. I do believe it would be tribal land, and not private property.
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin

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    Quote Originally Posted by wrightme View Post
    Any property that is determined to be private is that way. The big question I see is whether that land is private property, or tribal land. I do believe it would be tribal land, and not private property.
    Is tribal land not private property of said tribe?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmijackso View Post
    Is tribal land not private property of said tribe?
    Not according to the message of the CoP. No more so than government buildings are private property, afaik.
    Last edited by wrightme; 02-11-2011 at 12:07 AM.
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrightme View Post
    Not according to the message of the CoP. No more so than government buildings are private property, afaik.
    Well, I can't find much regarding this. There is a whole lot of mixed messages regarding different kinds of Trusts of Tribal land by Indian, non-indian, and tribal owners, etc. The only thing I was able to find that took a definitive stand on what they (the website) believed was The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.

    Q: In general, where do things stand for journalists in gaining access to Indian Country?

    A: Tribal land is private property, and tribal leaders have the right to exclude outside journalists. State freedom of information and public meetings laws do not apply to outside journalists because tribes are sovereign nations. Tribal courts would be the source of relief if a reporter brought a "First Amendment" violation, and the tribal court could interpret the document differently than federal courts. Those interpretations may also be difficult to find, as not all tribes report their decisions, and even among those that are reported, not all decisions are published in legal reporting services.
    http://www.rcfp.org/americanindian/qanda.html

    This is in line with my previous understanding. Tribal land is deemed a Sovereign Dependant Nation. I believe that pretty much all reservation land is deeded or Trusted to the tribe, making it private property. The tribe then is able to decide how to break that land up, i.e. allow tribe members to own property so that they may own their house etc.

    All in all, I'd say tread carefully on tribal land, I personally wouldn't want to become a test case lacking any hard evidence one way or another. Also, I fear we (I) may have thread-jacked. I now return you to your previously scheduled thread.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash Corrigan View Post
    My vote would be for my favorite OC weapon. A Ruger .44 Special Blackhawk with the Bisley grips and frame. It is a great carry gun. It is light enough to be comfortable yet heavy enuf to minimize the recoil when it is fired. With a 5.5" bbl and the handsome wooden grips and carried in a decent western syled leather holster on a gunbelt with 40 cartridge loops full of bright and shiney rounds it makes a statement for OC.

    This is honking big gun and looks like it means business. Combine that with the leather and the loaded cartridge loops and it never fails to get second looks in stores and on the street.

    As Nevada is an OC state the cops cannot even think that this weapon is a concealed weapon.

    However I will caution you when inside the Paiute Indian Tobacco store they pretty much have a cow every time I go there. Their Tribal Police are NOT informed as to state law regarding firearms and they think they can make up the rules as they go along.

    I was stopped once outside the store after making my purchases and hassled for a time by a Tribal Police Sergeant and his rookie Barney Fife. The Sergeant did not know that you could carry openly in Nevada and wanted to confiscate my gun and give me a ticket. I called 911 and got a real cop from Metro there in about 5 minutes.

    He explained the OC law to the Tribal Police and I was on my way very quickly.

    You cannot fix stupid.
    I have not laughed that hard in over a year, That is some true Balls - out OCing. I will be Honored to OC with you.

  14. #14
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    Neavda State Firearm

    How about "The Judge".....it wasn't made here but it seems fitting, or maybe the AR that is made by "Battle Born" locally in Reno

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