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Thread: CC permit worth getting at this point?

  1. #1
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    CC permit worth getting at this point?

    I have been on and off on this forum for a while but it has been a while. So heard about this law concerning CC and I was wanting to get a CCP at some point when I can afford it (when I graduate College probably lol), but my question is for you guys that are far more educated on this, is it even worth getting a CCP?

    If the law does not pass of course I will get one but assume the law passes. I am just trying to make sure the law would be I can CC without a permit?

    Thanks guys for all the help.

  2. #2
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    IMO Yes

    Regardless, you still have the federal GFSZ law. In an urban area, outside of your vehicle, it becomes a maze of routes that you would have to take and places to avoid. Simply to avoid breaking the law. Now if Wimmers bill adress the issue in a similar fashion to Arizona, i.e. citizens are considered licensed by the state if they are Legal to posess and own a firearm, that will not be the case.
    In addition, Utah's permit is recognized in 33 other states! comparatively high in relation to other states permits recognition.
    The other benefit is the training. There is a lot of law to wade through when trying to figure them out on your own. The Goal of the Utah concealed carry course is to farmiliarize you, the carrier, on the laws. It is a tremendous help to have a discussion regarding the can's and the can not's of Utah's law.

  3. #3
    Regular Member jpm84092's Avatar
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    Get the Permit - It is Worth it.

    Quote Originally Posted by cdrhoad View Post
    Regardless, you still have the federal GFSZ law. In an urban area, outside of your vehicle, it becomes a maze of routes that you would have to take and places to avoid. Simply to avoid breaking the law. Now if Wimmers bill adress the issue in a similar fashion to Arizona, i.e. citizens are considered licensed by the state if they are Legal to posess and own a firearm, that will not be the case.
    In addition, Utah's permit is recognized in 33 other states! comparatively high in relation to other states permits recognition.
    The other benefit is the training. There is a lot of law to wade through when trying to figure them out on your own. The Goal of the Utah concealed carry course is to farmiliarize you, the carrier, on the laws. It is a tremendous help to have a discussion regarding the can's and the can not's of Utah's law.
    My good friend cdrhoad is absolutely correct. Even with "Constitutional Carry", it is unclear that the Federal Gun Free School Zone (GFSZ) will not be an issue. Even beyond the Federal GFSZ, both Utah and the Feds have a law banning carry inside a school - unless you have a permit. This all hinges on the wording of the Federal Statute. It has language that exempts States that conduct background checks to verify the permit holder can lawfully own firearms under Federal Law. Laws like the one in Montana that "assumes" all citizens would pass such a check have not yet been tested in the courts.

    And, I echo his sentiment that the training in Utah and Federal Law is well worth the price of admission. Knowing when it is lawful (or not) to use deadly force can mean the difference between criminal and civil penalty potentials - and when you are going to "choose the right" to use a phase used by the predominant culture.

    And, even if you currently carry under the Utah Castle Doctrine in your car, if you do not wish to obtain a Utah CFP, you can pull over at our Eastern borders with CO and WY and our Northern Border with ID and disarm. (NV does not recognize the Utah permit and AZ does not require a permit.) But, with a Utah permit, you could pretty much drive to Florida for Spring Break and never have to disarm.

    Just saying......

    I am not a lawyer and I do not play one on TV - and I did not stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    My cats support the Second Amendment. NRA Life Member, NRA Instructor: Pistol, Rifle, & Personal Protection - NRA Certified Range Safety Officer, Utah BCI Certified Concealed Firearm Permit Instructor.
    "Permission Slips" from Utah, Pennsylvania, Nevada, Arizona, and Florida. _ Verily, thou shalt not fiddle with thine firearm whilst in the bathroom stall, lest thine spouse seek condolences from thine friends.

  4. #4
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by jpm84092 View Post
    I am not a lawyer and I do not play one on TV - and I did not stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    I'm liking this sense of humor your showing! I bet you coulda had a V8 though!

  5. #5
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    Another Reason: Can't Carry In "Hunting Preserves"

    Yes, get a permit.

    The Utah Dept. of Fish and Game have a rule--and their rules carry the weight of law--that you can't possess a firearm in many "Temporary Hunting Preserves" unless you're licensed to hunt there, the police, protecting your livestock, or licensed to carry concealed.

    This Rule applies to many (but not all) big game hunts (and possibly other hunts). There's usually some sort of big game hunt going on somewhere in the state between August and December. And you need to know each boundary (just understanding the boundaries--now there's a mind-blowing task!), the hunting dates and which Big Game Hunt is a Preserve that excludes unauthorized guns to be in compliance--a nearly impossible task! So unless you want to spend days and days studying every possible hunt date and boundary the Fish and Game has going, you can never be sure that when you're in the mountains you're not breaking their "Rules."

    This "Rule" of the Utah Fish Cops seemingly is not even preempted by the Utah State Law that states, "It is lawful to possess a loaded firearm in one's residence, temporary residence or camp."

    Now, I firmly believe in obeying the hunting and fishing laws, and for the record, I've never been cited for a violation, and the Fish and Game--God bless 'em--have a formidable task in enforcing these laws; but I've never met a Fish Cop who has an even remote sense of humor about their rules. (Just ask my buddy who was chastised by a Fish Cop for simply "looking on the wrong side" as he drove down a dirt road that was a hunt unit boundary!)

    Get a permit--where I work, we'll call you a "certified good guy."
    Last edited by Alneuman; 02-24-2011 at 12:10 PM.

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