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Thread: Ruger 1911

  1. #1
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    Ruger 1911

    Just hit the market last week. Ruger has a new one for OPEN CARRY. All stainless 1911. Think I will have to get one.
    Check it out here.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAZ5EYxpl2o

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    Yeah looks like a goodie, and hickok45 is the ****. Let us know how you like it!
    "If you don't want to be shorn, don't be sheep!"

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    Regular Member cbpeck's Avatar
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    I can't access youtube from my work computer, but I found this:

    http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2...-photo-leaked/

  4. #4
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    Well, I put 125 rounds through the Ruger today. A friend had just bought it. Normally a 1911 will take 200-300 rounds for breakin. This one went from the get go, not a single issue. priced at $629, it is not any better than my RIA 1911, priced at $389 + tax.
    I will stick with the Rockin Rock.

  5. #5
    Regular Member amzbrady's Avatar
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    I wish my backyard looked like that...

    Watching the shots at the big target in the very back you can see the bullet flying to target. pretty cool...
    Last edited by amzbrady; 04-28-2011 at 10:46 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trigger Dr View Post
    Well, I put 125 rounds through the Ruger today. A friend had just bought it. Normally a 1911 will take 200-300 rounds for breakin. This one went from the get go, not a single issue. priced at $629, it is not any better than my RIA 1911, priced at $389 + tax.
    I will stick with the Rockin Rock.
    Thanks for the insight doc. I was curious to hear about these and get a comparison. Your input is filed in the back of my noggin.
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  7. #7
    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trigger Dr View Post
    Normally a 1911 will take 200-300 rounds for breakin.

    And then there are Sig's which shoot great right out of the box.

    Have you ever considered opening up a "Service"? Where you break in new 1911's for customers? That way you could shoot lots of different guns without having to buy them.

    I'm sure that Ruger makes fine firearms, but I haven't run across any of their pistols that I would give up any of mine for.
    "If I shoot all the ammo I am carrying I either won't need anymore or more won't help"

    "If you refuse to stand up for others now, who will stand up for you when your time comes?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trigger Dr View Post
    Normally a 1911 will take 200-300 rounds for breakin. This one went from the get go, not a single issue.
    Last time I flipped through it, the Kimber manual suggested 1-1.5k rounds for "break-in."

    Makes me wonder why I like guns that function 100% out of the box (Glock, Sig, etc). Nice to hear they can make a 1911 that will do the same.

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    Quote Originally Posted by G20-IWB24/7 View Post
    Last time I flipped through it, the Kimber manual suggested 1-1.5k rounds for "break-in."

    Makes me wonder why I like guns that function 100% out of the box (Glock, Sig, etc). Nice to hear they can make a 1911 that will do the same.
    Onemore reason to pass on the Kimber. The gun most often sent in for warranty service when I worked at SW, was the Kimber followed by Taurus. Kimbers usually went 2-3 times before problem was corrected.
    My Rock Island has yet to have a failure of ANY kind after 1500 rounds. This was shot right out of the box after a basic cleaning. 25 yds offhand.. Can't complain for a "cheap" pistol.


    I have a Sig P250 in .357 Sig that I am going to put on the Table at the next WAC show.
    Last edited by Trigger Dr; 04-29-2011 at 05:27 PM.

  10. #10
    Regular Member Mainsail's Avatar
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    Ruger? Meh...


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    Quote Originally Posted by mainsail View Post
    ruger? Meh...

    i like it!!!!!!!!

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    Regular Member jt59's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G20-IWB24/7 View Post
    Last time I flipped through it, the Kimber manual suggested 1-1.5k rounds for "break-in."

    Makes me wonder why I like guns that function 100% out of the box (Glock, Sig, etc). Nice to hear they can make a 1911 that will do the same.
    Cite Please on the Kimber?

    The manuals on the Kimber site that I see, (all) indicate 400-500 rounds for break in recommended.

    http://www.kimberamerica.com/uploads...ad/Compact.pdf

    See page 26, this is what is indicated for all of their 1911's in various manuals, so I am not sure what you read.

    My ultra carry has worked perfectly out of the box...and now, about 1,500 rounds downrange continues to do so. No misfires, jams, stovepipe's etc....including 150 non factory, hand loads that were worked up for it.

    That said, you can go to virtually any website and find unhappy folks with problems, recalls, and discussion threads that express views of consternation over something or other...including Kimber and Glocks and Sigs. Like most things, you get what you pay for in quality....sometimes you just get a better deal. Find a gun that fit's you, is in your budget and practice enough that you can hit the target reliably....then buy two. I've always liked Rugers, but not Chryslers. This looks like a pretty nice one.
    Last edited by jt59; 05-02-2011 at 03:45 PM.
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  13. #13
    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jt59 View Post
    I've always liked Rugers, but not Chryslers.
    But a chrysler will carry more groceries and keep you drier
    "If I shoot all the ammo I am carrying I either won't need anymore or more won't help"

    "If you refuse to stand up for others now, who will stand up for you when your time comes?"

  14. #14
    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jt59 View Post
    Cite Please on the Kimber?

    The manuals on the Kimber site that I see, (all) indicate 400-500 rounds for break in recommended.

    http://www.kimberamerica.com/uploads...ad/Compact.pdf
    I have no ax to grind with Kimber or any other firearm for that matter but I have always wondered why, when one has to pay so much for a "High End" gun and then have to go through a Break In Period. I can understand a "Getting Used to " period but "Break In" has always sounded to be like they didn't go through the final fit and finish at the factory to insure flawless operation from the first shot.

    I have "built" a few fiireams for my own collection with lots of time and effort spent with stones, files, lapping compound, and just plain patience, in order to make sure every part "plays well with others".

    Honing and/or lapping of triggers, slides, bolts, locking lugs/surfaces, all take timeand contribute to the smoothness and reliability of a firearm. High end rifles have hand lapped barrels and are usually able to stack bullets in the same hole while "Sporting Goods Store" production rifles have machined barrels and often require lots of "break in" in order to get groups one wants to talk about.

    Yes, you get what you pay for but almost everyone I have talked to scratches their head over the number of "Kimber Stories" where they need this much break in, considering how much they cost. That goes for both pistols and rifles made by them.
    "If I shoot all the ammo I am carrying I either won't need anymore or more won't help"

    "If you refuse to stand up for others now, who will stand up for you when your time comes?"

  15. #15
    Regular Member jt59's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amlevin View Post
    I have no ax to grind with Kimber or any other firearm for that matter but I have always wondered why, when one has to pay so much for a "High End" gun and then have to go through a Break In Period. I can understand a "Getting Used to " period but "Break In" has always sounded to be like they didn't go through the final fit and finish at the factory to insure flawless operation from the first shot.

    I have "built" a few fiireams for my own collection with lots of time and effort spent with stones, files, lapping compound, and just plain patience, in order to make sure every part "plays well with others".

    Honing and/or lapping of triggers, slides, bolts, locking lugs/surfaces, all take timeand contribute to the smoothness and reliability of a firearm. High end rifles have hand lapped barrels and are usually able to stack bullets in the same hole while "Sporting Goods Store" production rifles have machined barrels and often require lots of "break in" in order to get groups one wants to talk about.

    Yes, you get what you pay for but almost everyone I have talked to scratches their head over the number of "Kimber Stories" where they need this much break in, considering how much they cost. That goes for both pistols and rifles made by them.
    Things requiring a break in period:

    new jobs
    new bosses
    new girlfriends
    spouses (never ending)
    cars: especially extended wear issues on Chryslers

    Here's exactly what the SRT engineers said:

    (question)

    I have an '09 R/T with the 6-speed and wanted to hear your take on proper break in for the engine. I've heard everything from "drive it like you stole it, break it in how you want it to run" to "baby it for the first 1000 miles and change the oil" and everything in between. set me straight please!

    that leads me to another question. i've heard there is special oil from the manufacturer that allows the coatings on the pistons and other internal parts to cure completely so its important to keep that oil in there for the first couple thousand miles. is that true and can i switch to synthetic, say after I put my first 1000 miles on it?

    thanks!

    (answer)
    We typically recommend that you simple avoid hard, red line launches for the break in period, at least 400 miles. Normal city and / or highway driving is fine. Break in is realy more more critical for your differential than your engine. Your engine will likely continue to loosen up for up to 2500 miles, with performance improving.

    Follow your owner's manual for fluids. A premium synthetic is an option as long as it meets specs. Original fluids are not unique to commercial oils.


    As far as your first oil change there is no break in oil in these cars. Read these:

    http://www.challengerforumz.com/show...3&postcount=55


    Just don't buy anything made on a Monday, Friday or the day before a long weekend, including Kimbers, Glocks and Sigs
    Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat....Teddy Roosevelt

  16. #16
    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jt59 View Post

    Just don't buy anything made on a Monday, Friday or the day before a long weekend, including Kimbers, Glocks and Sigs
    And then there are some things that apparently are only made on Mondays or Fridays.
    "If I shoot all the ammo I am carrying I either won't need anymore or more won't help"

    "If you refuse to stand up for others now, who will stand up for you when your time comes?"

  17. #17
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    Any OC capable firearm (to stay OT) sold as a regular, non custom, item is going to need a bit of work to smooth out and match up the mating surfaces. When first purchased, one shoulkd do a field strip and good cleaning Before firing. Lube it well and head for the range.
    Things on a 1911 specifically that will need time to work in are:
    1. Slide; Use a good lube and cycle the slide manually about 200-300 times.
    2. Lightly polish,with 400 grit wet or dry, the inside of the bushing and mating surface of he barrel. Not a mirror shine, but VERY light polish.
    The trigger can be smoothed out by disassembly, and polishing the frame channel where the trigger bow slides. Do not polish the trigger bow or make any adjustment to it. Use a lot of care here, so as to not effect the pre-travel or sear engagement.
    Do not mess with the sear, disconnector or any part of the fire control system unless you have the skill and jigs for proper angles.
    There are very few "drop in"replacement parts ie. grip safety, hammer, thumb safety, that are "drop in". They
    will all require some fitting to function properly and safely.

  18. #18
    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trigger Dr View Post
    Any OC capable firearm (to stay OT) sold as a regular, non custom, item is going to need a bit of work to smooth out and match up the mating surfaces. When first purchased, one shoulkd do a field strip and good cleaning Before firing. Lube it well and head for the range.
    Things on a 1911 specifically that will need time to work in are:
    1. Slide; Use a good lube and cycle the slide manually about 200-300 times.
    2. Lightly polish,with 400 grit wet or dry, the inside of the bushing and mating surface of he barrel. Not a mirror shine, but VERY light polish.
    The trigger can be smoothed out by disassembly, and polishing the frame channel where the trigger bow slides. Do not polish the trigger bow or make any adjustment to it. Use a lot of care here, so as to not effect the pre-travel or sear engagement.
    Do not mess with the sear, disconnector or any part of the fire control system unless you have the skill and jigs for proper angles.
    There are very few "drop in"replacement parts ie. grip safety, hammer, thumb safety, that are "drop in". They
    will all require some fitting to function properly and safely.

    I guess I missed out on all the "fun". My Sig didn't need any of that. Over 20,000 rounds later it still doesn't. Nothing but oil and slide grease.
    "If I shoot all the ammo I am carrying I either won't need anymore or more won't help"

    "If you refuse to stand up for others now, who will stand up for you when your time comes?"

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by amlevin View Post
    I guess I missed out on all the "fun". My Sig didn't need any of that. Over 20,000 rounds later it still doesn't. Nothing but oil and slide grease.
    It seems like there is always one that slips through.(lol) Good for yours. I like Sig.

  20. #20
    Campaign Veteran gogodawgs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amlevin View Post
    I guess I missed out on all the "fun". My Sig didn't need any of that. Over 20,000 rounds later it still doesn't. Nothing but oil and slide grease.
    Same here. Two Sigs (229 and 250) and never cleaned them until 3000+ rounds later, never a FTF or FTE, flawless and on target.
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