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Thread: OCing in a polling place?

  1. #1
    Regular Member 09jisaac's Avatar
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    OCing in a polling place?

    I vote at a school so I know that I can't carry in there. But just for principle can you legally open carry in a polling place as long as where you vote isn't itself of limits?

    And while we're at it, and because this is a very knowledgeable group:

    Can they legally make a church a polling station (Burnaugh, Boyd County)?
    And is there anything against talking on a cell phone while at the place you vote while you're waiting to vote?

  2. #2
    Regular Member 09jisaac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gutshot View Post
    I've voted while OC on three occasions. I have never voted in a church and don't know if polls are ever placed in a church, maybe someone else can chime in here.
    So there is no laws against carrying in a polling station?

    But I was saying that there WAS, last election, voting held in a church in Burnaugh Boyd County. My mom took a legally mentally retarded man there to vote. I don't know if they're going to have it there this time too though. I was just wondering if this was what they meant by the "separation of church and state".

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    I work in elections. Sometimes churches are used mainly due to the need to have somewhere that has handicap ramps(all polling places are required to have). Choices are limited in some counties.

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    I've worked the polls at a church before--it's pretty typical. IMHO, there's no such thing as "separation of church and state".

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    Quote Originally Posted by 09jisaac View Post
    I was just wondering if this was what they meant by the "separation of church and state".
    Separation of church and state has nothing to do with that.

    As intended by the founders, separation of church and state was originally supposed to prevent the government from controlling the churches. Before the Constitution was written, several state/colonies were trying to exert control over the churches. They would only recognize certain churches, they required ministers to be licensed by the state, and some required all people to pay tithes to a certain church.

    This is a far cry from what they claim is separation of church and state now. Now they want to prohibit anyone on the government from mentioning God, Jesus, or anything else having to do with Christianity. At the same time, any other religion can be mentioned. They also want to tell the churches what they can or can't do.

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    Kinda on-topic, and sorta funny...

    Yesterday being election day in Kentucky, there's still a rather quaint law on the books that prohibits the sale of alcohol before 6pm, when the polls close.

    So, yesterday afternoon I was at a pub/tavern in Newport Ky. that serves enough food to bother being open on election day (the bars without food just open at 6pm). Anyhow, I was thinking about the "50% or more of sales" food versus alcohol part of the KRS with regards to carry. 'Hey' I thought to myself 'Right now ALL these places that happen to be open are ZERO percent-of-their-revenue in alcohol sales' Hmm...

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