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Thread: OT - Memorial Day Thank You...

  1. #1
    Regular Member Bucks Gun Shop's Avatar
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    OT - Memorial Day Thank You...

    I know that there are a number of members of OpenCarry.org that are either active duty or military retired... I want you guys to know that I sincerely appreciate the sacrafices that you are or have made for me and my family... In my eyes - you guys are the real American Heros...
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    The Constitution of the United States does not grant rights to citizens; it limits the powers of government to infringe on the rights which have already endowed upon us by our Creator. One of those is the right to keep and bear arms, to defend our persons and property in any manner we see fit.

  2. #2
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    Not off topic at all, our past, present and future warriors are the reason we still have the right to be armed and OC.

    I stop every Memorial Day weekend to honor and thank my warrior ancestors and a few others like Samuel Whittemore, Gary Gordon and Randy Shughart, my heros.

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    http://www.komonews.com/news/local/1...ml?skipthumb=Y

    I attended this memorial service today and i wish i could express how powerful it was but i will save everyone from that. However monday at 1pm there will be a memorial service for all vets who are no longer with us at the cemetery.

    I hope people come i will be attending it, BTW No weapons allowed of any kind... fyi

  4. #4
    State Researcher Bill Starks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarhead1055 View Post
    BTW No weapons allowed of any kind... fyi
    OK, I had to look this one up....
    38 CFR 1.218 - Security and law enforcement at VA facilities.

    http://cfr.vlex.com/vid/1-218-securi...ities-19775619

    (13) Weapons and explosives. No person while on property shall carry firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, or explosives, either openly or concealed, except for official purposes.

    See also 37, 38, 39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucks Gun Shop View Post
    I know that there are a number of members of OpenCarry.org that are either active duty or military retired... I want you guys to know that I sincerely appreciate the sacrafices that you are or have made for me and my family... In my eyes - you guys are the real American Heros...
    Much appreciated

  6. #6
    Campaign Veteran gogodawgs's Avatar
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    8 UW Alumni Medal of Honor Recipients

    UW Honorees


    The UW has the solemn honor of having the most MOH recipients other than the service academies. They are:

    Honorees
    Deming Bronson, 1LT, USA (1915)
    This UW graduate won a Medal of Honor in World War I for capturing enemy prisoners near Eclisfontaine, France, in 1918. He was wounded by a hand grenade and a bullet and still led his unit to capture enemy positions. At the UW, he was a forestry major and played Husky football from 1912-1916 under legendary Coach Gil Dobie.



    Gregory “Pappy” Boyington, Col., USMC (1934)
    The Marines’ WWII ace, Boyington downed 28 enemy planes before being captured by the Japanese and spending the rest of the conflict in a prisoner of war camp. His squadron’s exploits became the basis for the 1970s TV series, Baa Baa Black Sheep.



    Robert E. Galer, BGen, USMC (1935)
    As a Marine Corps major in August and September of 1942, he repeatedly engaged Japanese aerial forces in combat, “individually shooting down 11 enemy bomber and fighter aircraft over a period of 29 days,” according to the text of his medal citation. Galer was himself shot down four times during his service in World War II and Korea. He retired as a brigadier general in 1957.



    William Nakamura, PFC, USA (1941)
    Twice on July 4, 1944, Private First Class William K. Nakamura singlehandedly attacked German machine gunners in Italy so his platoon could be freed from pinned-down positions. During his second effort, Nakamura was killed. He had volunteered for the Army after his family and other Japanese Americans on the West coast were forced to move to internment camps.



    Bruce Crandall, Maj., USA (1951-52)
    For extraordinary heroism as a Flight Commander in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). On Nov. 14, 1965, despite the fact that his landing zone was still under relentless enemy fire, Major Crandall landed and supervised the loading of seriously wounded soldiers aboard his aircraft. His voluntary decision to land under the most extreme fire instilled in the other pilots the will and spirit to continue to land their own aircraft.



    John D. “Bud” Hawk, Sgt., USA (1952)
    Army Sgt. Hawk was wounded on August 20, 1944, in France when the German army was trying to escape its encirclement following the Normandy invasion. A portion of his medal citation reads, “Sgt. Hawk’s fearless initiative and heroic conduct, even while suffering from a painful wound, was in large measure responsible for crushing two desperate attempts of the enemy to escape from the Falaise Pocket and for taking more than 500 prisoners.”



    Archie Van Winkle, Col., USMC (1961)
    Van Winkle was awarded the Medal of Honor for action in Korea. On November 2, 1950, Van Winkle led a daring charge through withering enemy fire during which a bullet shattered his arm and an enemy hand grenade exploded against his chest. Though severely wounded, he refused to be evacuated, and continued to shout orders and encouragement to his men while lying on the ground weak from loss of blood. His heroic leadership enabled the outnumbered platoon to repulse a fanatical enemy attack.



    Robert Leisy, 2LT, USA (1968)
    He served as a 2nd Lt. in the Vietnam War and was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously. During an engagement in Phuoc Long Province, Leisy’s unit was ambushed by a far larger force of North Vietnamese soldiers. He shielded his men from a rocket grenade attack and died of the wounds on Dec. 2, 1969. He was 24.

    Live Free or Die!

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    i appreciate the sentiment, but those of us on here should more properly be recognized on Veteran's Day. Today is a day to remember those of our brothers and sisters who didn't make it home...

    If you go to Arlington you can read part of this over the McClellan gate:

    Bivouac of the Dead

    The muffled drum's sad roll has beat
    The soldier's last tattoo;
    No more on Life's parade shall meet
    That brave and fallen few.
    On fame's eternal camping ground
    Their silent tents to spread,
    And glory guards, with solemn round
    The bivouac of the dead.

    No rumor of the foe's advance
    Now swells upon the wind;
    Nor troubled thought at midnight haunts
    Of loved ones left behind;
    No vision of the morrow's strife
    The warrior's dreams alarms;
    No braying horn or screaming fife
    At dawn shall call to arms.

    Their shriveled swords are red with rust,
    Their plumed heads are bowed,
    Their haughty banner, trailed in dust,
    Is now their martial shroud.
    And plenteous funeral tears have washed
    The red stains from each brow,
    And the proud forms, by battle gashed
    Are free from anguish now.

    The neighing troop, the flashing blade,
    The bugle's stirring blast,
    The charge, the dreadful cannonade,
    The din and shout, are past;
    Nor war's wild note, nor glory's peal
    Shall thrill with fierce delight
    Those breasts that nevermore may feel
    The rapture of the fight.

    Like the fierce Northern hurricane
    That sweeps the great plateau,
    Flushed with triumph, yet to gain,
    Come down the serried foe,
    Who heard the thunder of the fray
    Break o'er the field beneath,
    Knew the watchword of the day
    Was "Victory or death!"

    Long had the doubtful conflict raged
    O'er all that stricken plain,
    For never fiercer fight had waged
    The vengeful blood of Spain;
    And still the storm of battle blew,
    Still swelled the glory tide;
    Not long, our stout old Chieftain knew,
    Such odds his strength could bide.

    Twas in that hour his stern command
    Called to a martyr's grave
    The flower of his beloved land,
    The nation's flag to save.
    By rivers of their father's gore
    His first-born laurels grew,
    And well he deemed the sons would pour
    Their lives for glory too.

    For many a mother's breath has swept
    O'er Angostura's plain --
    And long the pitying sky has wept
    Above its moldered slain.
    The raven's scream, or eagle's flight,
    Or shepherd's pensive lay,
    Alone awakes each sullen height
    That frowned o'er that dread fray.

    Sons of the Dark and Bloody Ground
    Ye must not slumber there,
    Where stranger steps and tongues resound
    Along the heedless air.
    Your own proud land's heroic soil
    Shall be your fitter grave;
    She claims from war his richest spoil --
    The ashes of her brave.

    Thus 'neath their parent turf they rest,
    Far from the gory field,
    Borne to a Spartan mother's breast
    On many a bloody shield;
    The sunshine of their native sky
    Smiles sadly on them here,
    And kindred eyes and hearts watch by
    The heroes sepulcher.

    Rest on embalmed and sainted dead!
    Dear as the blood ye gave;
    No impious footstep here shall tread
    The herbage of your grave;
    Nor shall your glory be forgot
    While Fame her record keeps,
    For honor points the hallowed spot
    Where valor proudly sleeps.

    Yon marble minstrel's voiceless stone
    In deathless song shall tell,
    When many a vanquished ago has flown,
    The story how ye fell;
    Nor wreck, nor change, nor winter's blight,
    Nor time's remorseless doom,
    Can dim one ray of glory's light
    That gilds your deathless tomb.

    Theodore O'Hara 1847

  8. #8
    Campaign Veteran gogodawgs's Avatar
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    As always, go Dawgs! I am proud of our MOH Hero's!

    Quote Originally Posted by gogodawgs View Post
    UW Honorees


    The UW has the solemn honor of having the most MOH recipients other than the service academies. They are:

    Honorees
    Deming Bronson, 1LT, USA (1915)
    This UW graduate won a Medal of Honor in World War I for capturing enemy prisoners near Eclisfontaine, France, in 1918. He was wounded by a hand grenade and a bullet and still led his unit to capture enemy positions. At the UW, he was a forestry major and played Husky football from 1912-1916 under legendary Coach Gil Dobie.



    Gregory “Pappy” Boyington, Col., USMC (1934)
    The Marines’ WWII ace, Boyington downed 28 enemy planes before being captured by the Japanese and spending the rest of the conflict in a prisoner of war camp. His squadron’s exploits became the basis for the 1970s TV series, Baa Baa Black Sheep.



    Robert E. Galer, BGen, USMC (1935)
    As a Marine Corps major in August and September of 1942, he repeatedly engaged Japanese aerial forces in combat, “individually shooting down 11 enemy bomber and fighter aircraft over a period of 29 days,” according to the text of his medal citation. Galer was himself shot down four times during his service in World War II and Korea. He retired as a brigadier general in 1957.



    William Nakamura, PFC, USA (1941)
    Twice on July 4, 1944, Private First Class William K. Nakamura singlehandedly attacked German machine gunners in Italy so his platoon could be freed from pinned-down positions. During his second effort, Nakamura was killed. He had volunteered for the Army after his family and other Japanese Americans on the West coast were forced to move to internment camps.



    Bruce Crandall, Maj., USA (1951-52)
    For extraordinary heroism as a Flight Commander in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). On Nov. 14, 1965, despite the fact that his landing zone was still under relentless enemy fire, Major Crandall landed and supervised the loading of seriously wounded soldiers aboard his aircraft. His voluntary decision to land under the most extreme fire instilled in the other pilots the will and spirit to continue to land their own aircraft.



    John D. “Bud” Hawk, Sgt., USA (1952)
    Army Sgt. Hawk was wounded on August 20, 1944, in France when the German army was trying to escape its encirclement following the Normandy invasion. A portion of his medal citation reads, “Sgt. Hawk’s fearless initiative and heroic conduct, even while suffering from a painful wound, was in large measure responsible for crushing two desperate attempts of the enemy to escape from the Falaise Pocket and for taking more than 500 prisoners.”



    Archie Van Winkle, Col., USMC (1961)
    Van Winkle was awarded the Medal of Honor for action in Korea. On November 2, 1950, Van Winkle led a daring charge through withering enemy fire during which a bullet shattered his arm and an enemy hand grenade exploded against his chest. Though severely wounded, he refused to be evacuated, and continued to shout orders and encouragement to his men while lying on the ground weak from loss of blood. His heroic leadership enabled the outnumbered platoon to repulse a fanatical enemy attack.



    Robert Leisy, 2LT, USA (1968)
    He served as a 2nd Lt. in the Vietnam War and was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously. During an engagement in Phuoc Long Province, Leisy’s unit was ambushed by a far larger force of North Vietnamese soldiers. He shielded his men from a rocket grenade attack and died of the wounds on Dec. 2, 1969. He was 24.

    Live Free or Die!

  9. #9
    Campaign Veteran gogodawgs's Avatar
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    and my family

    My ex-wife...Navy, Operation Noble Eagle
    My dad...Vietnam, Yeoman for Adm. Ulysses S. Grant Sharp Jr.
    My uncles...Vietnam, US Army
    My great uncle...Ada Andersen, USS Arizona WWII
    My great great, great, great grandfather....William L Storrs, War of 1812, US Congressman
    My great great, great great uncle...Henry R Storrs, War of 1812, US Congressman
    And lastly, (not sure...great something grandfather) James Smith, Revolutionary War, Signer of the Declaration of Independence.

    Thanks to my family who have served, their wives and families....
    Live Free or Die!

  10. #10
    Regular Member Squeak's Avatar
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    And to 3 of my HS classmates; Jason Holes, Ken Avery, and Wayne McConnell. I will never forget!

  11. #11
    Campaign Veteran ak56's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucks Gun Shop View Post
    I know that there are a number of members of OpenCarry.org that are either active duty or military retired... I want you guys to know that I sincerely
    appreciate the sacrafices that you are or have made for me and my family... In my eyes - you guys are the real American Heros...
    +1000...
    No right is held more sacred, or is more carefully guarded, by the common law than the right of every individual to the possession and control of his own person, free from all restraint or interference of others, unless by clear and unquestionable authority of law. Union Pacific Rail Co. vs Botsford as quoted in Terry v Ohio.


    Talk to your cats about catnip - before it's too late.

  12. #12
    Regular Member LkWd_Don's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oneeyeross View Post
    i appreciate the sentiment, but those of us on here should more properly be recognized on Veteran's Day. Today is a day to remember those of our brothers and sisters who didn't make it home...
    I agree, today is not about us or our brothers and sisters who made it home. Though I will say, that thanking a Veteran is always an appropriate thing to do and will offer my own deeply grateful thanks to all of our Past & Present Patriots.
    Lets Unite and REMIND our Government that WE are the source of their authority and that WE demand our Rights be returned, Unabridged, Non-infringed, without denial or disparagement. The faults of a few, reflect badly on many, I therefore do not suggest anyone support WAC. My EDC is either a H&K USP .40 or a Taurus 689 .357 filled with Snake Loads

  13. #13
    State Researcher Bill Starks's Avatar
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    To a great fishing buddy & friend, Sergeant First Class Paul R. Smith (Smitty)

    http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/smi...ile/index.html

  14. #14
    Regular Member cpgrad08's Avatar
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    To all my brothers that didn't make it back and now guard heaven's gate. Semper Fi.
    I carry a Para Ordance 1911 .45 ACP.

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