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Thread: I propose a new name for LEO, SotL

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    Regular Member hermannr's Avatar
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    I propose a new name for LEO, SotL

    Hej Everyone: Because of several things I have read here, and on other forums, I was thinking we should maybe use different terminology for our friends in the law enforcement community, one that would better fit for their position.

    You all remember the "old days" when they we called law enforcement, "peace officers" or "officers of the peace" indicating that their main job was to keep the peace in the community. "Peace officer" is a good term, but the acronym wouldn't be the best for understanding.

    This change in terminology would be a good reminder everyone that Law Enforcement is Not the "authority" of the law, but that the written law (The Washington State Constitution and the RCWs here in WA) is the "authority" they are the servants that are hired to "keep the peace" under the law that is written.

    I would propose we call all that we would call LEO to day..."Servants of the Law" from now on (an acronym could be SotL?), to better remind everyone that Law Enforcement personnel are "UNDER the law", just like every other citizen (person) in this country, and that they are not "the law".

    Other suggestions maybe?

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    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    An admirable suggestion, but---

    That's going to be as difficult as getting people to stop calling all adjustable wrenches Crescent Wrenches or Magazines for firearms "Clips".
    "If I shoot all the ammo I am carrying I either won't need anymore or more won't help"

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    Quote Originally Posted by amlevin View Post
    That's going to be as difficult as getting people to stop calling all adjustable wrenches Crescent Wrenches or Magazines for firearms "Clips".
    +1

    the second one is one of my pet peeves. I HATE it when people do that!
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    Regular Member xxx.jakk.xxx's Avatar
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    I would love to argue that magazines and clips are not the same thing, but people's mis-usage of the word so much has actually made "clip" mean the same as "magazine". It used to be that a Clip was something used for loading a magazine while a magazine was something used to feed the bullets into the chamber one by one. So a Stripped Clip would put the bullets into the AR-15 Magazine, then the Magazine would put the bullets into the Chamber as they're being fired. Moon Clips feed the Bullets into the Cylinder of a Revolver which is technically the Magazine of a Revolver as it moves the bullets, one by one, to the firing chamber.

    But yeah, nowadays... Clip means magazine and Magazine means clip. I've learned to deal with hearing people use them interchangeably since I am actually the only person I know who actually knows of a difference between the two...
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    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxx.jakk.xxx View Post

    since I am actually the only person I know who actually knows of a difference between the two...
    If that were true then you'd know it was "Stripper", not "Stripped".

    And just to "pick the nit" more, you left out the "enbloc clip" that allows you to place the whole mess in the magazine of an M-1 at the same time.
    Last edited by amlevin; 05-28-2011 at 02:46 PM.
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    How about just calling them Cops?
    It's what they are and everybody can spell it.

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    Regular Member xxx.jakk.xxx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR Redenck View Post
    How about just calling them Cops?
    It's what they are and everybody can spell it.
    Citizen on Patrol?
    "though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for I know that you are by my side" Psalms 23:4

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    Quote Originally Posted by xxx.jakk.xxx View Post
    Citizen on Patrol?
    No, short for "Copper" which related to the copper buttons on the uniform sleeves. These buttons were to disuade wiping ones nose on the coat sleeve.

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    Regular Member xxx.jakk.xxx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trigger Dr View Post
    No, short for "Copper" which related to the copper buttons on the uniform sleeves. These buttons were to disuade wiping ones nose on the coat sleeve.
    I did not know that. I just figured it was for "Citizen on Patrol" since I've seen it written on the back of some Police Cars in Port orchard.
    "though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for I know that you are by my side" Psalms 23:4

    "Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power." Benjamin Franklin

    “It’s always open season on criminals in Mason County, and there’s no bag limit.” Sen. Tim Sheldon (D)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trigger Dr View Post
    No, short for "Copper" which related to the copper buttons on the uniform sleeves. These buttons were to disuade wiping ones nose on the coat sleeve.
    While I agree on the origein of the term "copper" that is the first time I've heard any explaination for the location of the button. Kinda makes one wonder just where they were finding those fine gentlemen doesn't it.

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    Regular Member 1911er's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxx.jakk.xxx View Post
    I did not know that. I just figured it was for "Citizen on Patrol" since I've seen it written on the back of some Police Cars in Port orchard.
    The reason you see that on some of the patrol cars in Port Orchard is because those are the volunteer police officers. They are literally citizens on patrol
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    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
    While I agree on the origein of the term "copper" that is the first time I've heard any explaination for the location of the button. Kinda makes one wonder just where they were finding those fine gentlemen doesn't it.
    According to my Grandfather who was a tailor "from the Old Country" that was the purpose. Showed up on all the fine suits of the time. In those days, everyone who didn't "shovel (synonym for agricultural waste)" wore a suit to work. Bricklayer to Accountant. Some just wore fancier suits. Clean ones too sometimes.
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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amlevin View Post
    According to my Grandfather who was a tailor "from the Old Country" that was the purpose. Showed up on all the fine suits of the time. In those days, everyone who didn't "shovel (synonym for agricultural waste)" wore a suit to work. Bricklayer to Accountant. Some just wore fancier suits. Clean ones too sometimes.
    The more expensive suits had more buttons per sleeve than the cheaper ones too.
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    Anti-Saldana Freedom Fighter Venator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxx.jakk.xxx View Post
    I did not know that. I just figured it was for "Citizen on Patrol" since I've seen it written on the back of some Police Cars in Port orchard.
    And it was Constable on Patrol
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    Regular Member MKEgal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxx.jakk.xxx
    people's mis-usage of the word so much has actually made "clip" mean the same as "magazine"
    Kinda like how Kleenex[TM] is still technically a trademark for a brand of facial tissue, but 'kleenex' is used generically to ask for a facial tissue?

    Jell-O is similar in being specific & generic.

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    Regular Member xxx.jakk.xxx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venator View Post
    And it was Constable on Patrol
    In this area I've only seen "Citizen", but 1911 already explained that that is because they're volunteers.

    Quote Originally Posted by MKEgal View Post
    Kinda like how Kleenex[TM] is still technically a trademark for a brand of facial tissue, but 'kleenex' is used generically to ask for a facial tissue?

    Jell-O is similar in being specific & generic.

    Pretty much. Everything that I can find that actually states the difference mentions that now they are synonymous for each other, now, because of people using them interchangeably before.
    Last edited by xxx.jakk.xxx; 05-28-2011 at 07:30 PM.
    "though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for I know that you are by my side" Psalms 23:4

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    zipper
    band-aid
    scotch tape

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trigger Dr View Post
    No, short for "Copper" which related to the copper buttons on the uniform sleeves. These buttons were to disuade wiping ones nose on the coat sleeve.
    Another version says it was because a lot of the badges were actually made of copper. Nothing about buttons. Back then handkerchiefs were quite commonly used to wipe noses, not sleeves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldCurlyWolf View Post
    Another version says it was because a lot of the badges were actually made of copper. Nothing about buttons. Back then handkerchiefs were quite commonly used to wipe noses, not sleeves.

    Handkerchiefs were not used to wipe sleeves?

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    Regular Member Metalhead47's Avatar
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    *groans*

    ok, it's official. We really will argue about EVERYTHING here.

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    Actually, TriggerDr, I seem to recall from a long-ago CJ course in college that "cop" originated by the initials the old-time guys used on their reports and the documentation that they initialed as they went about their appointed rounds -- "constable on patrol" ...

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    Why not try an authoritative source. Dictionary.com presents dictionary entries from several different sources.

    None of those sources mention the abbreviation. One mentions copper, the metal. Most trace the word back to other words, meaning to take or seize or arrest, and ultimately back to the Latin capere, meaning to take.

    I tend to believe that explanation. When I was a child, we used the word as slang for take or steal more than we used it to mean a policeman.

  23. #23
    Regular Member hermannr's Avatar
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    Entymology.com says the "cop" is from a 1704 northern English dialect word for "to seize, or to catch" It was being used for a policeman in England by 1859.

    Like "cop out" is to escape: "cop" is to "seize".

    So, "cop" being used for a policeman probably comes from the policeman "seizing" the wanted man and bring him to the justice.

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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Metalhead47
    *groans*ok, it's official.
    We really will argue about EVERYTHING here.
    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLT View Post
    No we won't!
    You boys stop arguing now and play nice.

    BTW - that should be "anything" not "everything."
    Last edited by Grapeshot; 05-29-2011 at 02:04 PM. Reason: fixed quote
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    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    Citing the "Ultimate Authority" Wikipedia, here is the "straight poop":

    Cop or Copper
    While commonly believed to be an acronym for Constable On Patrol, the term refers to "one who captures or snatches". This word first appeared in the early 18th century, and can be matched with the word "cap", which has the same meaning and whose etymology can be traced to the Latin word 'capere'. (The word retains this meaning in other contexts: teenagers "cop a feel" on a date, and they have also been known to "cop an attitude".) Variation: Copper. It is also believed that the term Copper was the original, unshortened word, popularly believed to represent the copper badges American officers used to wear at the time of origin, but in fact probably used in Britain to mean "someone who cops" long before this. It is also believed to come from the Latin word 'Corpore' meaning body, i.e. a body of men
    Here's a complete(?) list of slang terms for police officers from around the world:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...olice_officers

    I do wonder how it could be complete however as it doesn't have some of the oft used 4-letter words. Must be the "Family Version".
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