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Thread: Strong side draw vs. Cross Draw?

  1. #1
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    Strong side draw vs. Cross Draw?

    I know that when it is all said and done, it is about what is most comfortable for you when you have to draw your firearm. What are your thoughts?

    Personally, I find it easier to cross draw. Maybe it's because the strong side draw feels like I have to pull my 1911 "up and out" and the cross draw feels more natural. Also, from a seated position in my vehicle, I have much less to deal with if I had to draw my firearm.

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    Im ambi- so sometimes I carry "strong side" sometimes the other, depending on what Im doing, other times I carry cross-draw,also depending on what Im doing.
    I train myself as equally as I can in all 3 modes for OC and CC.
    From cross-draw I even try to practice Cavalry draw with the left hand, to account for the possibility of the "right/strong" hand being in some way injured or disabled or otherwise occupied.

    As for actual shooting, I alternate holds when shooting as well. 1 mag strong hand, 1 mag "weak" hand,1 mag both-hands, etc.
    My own feeling on the matter is if I limit myself to only one method of carry/draw/shoot, I limit my options, and invite Murhpy too openly.
    Last edited by j4l; 05-29-2011 at 12:58 PM.

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    I carry crossdraw OC or CC.

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    I'm a lefty and I prefer to appendix carry (is it really appendix carry since the appendix is on the right and as a lefty I carry it on the left ) for CC and for OC I prefer strong side on the hip. For me cross-draw just feels off and feels take longer, while strong side feels more natural. Though with strong side it is a bit of a pain if I were to have to draw while in the car.

    Oh and I prefer appendix carry as it's easier to hide the grip of a full-size XDm under my shirt (OC is illegal in OK pretty much except when at home and under a few specific situations). It allows me to cant the gun forward a bit which both makes carrying more comfortable given my body size, and means that the grip doesn't stick out like when I don't cant the gun forward.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aknazer View Post
    I'm a lefty and I prefer to appendix carry (is it really appendix carry since the appendix is on the right and as a lefty I carry it on the left ) for CC and for OC I prefer strong side on the hip. For me cross-draw just feels off and feels take longer, while strong side feels more natural. Though with strong side it is a bit of a pain if I were to have to draw while in the car.

    Oh and I prefer appendix carry as it's easier to hide the grip of a full-size XDm under my shirt (OC is illegal in OK pretty much except when at home and under a few specific situations). It allows me to cant the gun forward a bit which both makes carrying more comfortable given my body size, and means that the grip doesn't stick out like when I don't cant the gun forward.
    Can relate- my full-size .45 has rather long grips,but canted well forward ,actually conceals a lot better than I expected under a t-shirt,etc.

  6. #6
    Regular Member LibertyDeath's Avatar
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    I prefer one for each hand...

    Then again I only have one pistol so I just strong side carry it.

  7. #7
    Regular Member Michigander's Avatar
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    For me, I only carry from a cross draw position when IWB carrying concealed. It offers me a way to shake hands, hug women who are into hugging but are gun phobic, and do other activities while keeping my left arm available to block other people from contact. This also keeps my left hand available to lift my shirt or coat up and facilitate a good draw by my right hand.

    For open carry, I am a firm believer in strong side carry.
    Last edited by Michigander; 06-04-2011 at 11:00 PM.
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    I think it was No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan where I read and saw photos of how easy it can be for an opponent to grab a gun carried cross-draw.

    Of course, this doesn't address the strong side grab-from-behind. But, when I think about it, once I know there is an opponent, I'm gonna be facing him.

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    Regular Member Michigander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen View Post
    I think it was No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan where I read and saw photos of how easy it can be for an opponent to grab a gun carried cross-draw.

    Of course, this doesn't address the strong side grab-from-behind. But, when I think about it, once I know there is an opponent, I'm gonna be facing him.
    I'm honestly not so convinced it actually matters if the carrier does his or her part. Obviously with concealed carry it doesn't matter since being hidden is the retention, but for any open carry, especially with level 2 and less retention, there is a dire need to make sure that your gun is not within instant grabbing distance of anyone you may encounter. If it can't be avoided, the retention level needs to be stepped up. One could argue that level 2 is generally good enough for more crowded areas, but I say better safe than sorry, use a level 3.

    And even with my level 3 Safariland, I know I'm not overly comfortable in extremely crowded areas OCing, and generally prefer to carry concealed in such situations.
    Last edited by Michigander; 06-05-2011 at 05:49 PM.
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  10. #10
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    I don't advocate the cross-draw, but it does have its place and fills a need for some. If I were presented with the need to cross-draw or not carry, you can bet I'll be in a cross-draw. I'm in strong-side only, for the most part as that's how I train.

    It seems that holster choice can be key in cross-draw carry. Not a single factor can be sacrificed in choosing a cd holster. Comfort, position, material, durability, and security will all be equally important.
    Last edited by REALteach4u; 06-06-2011 at 12:42 AM.

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    I cross draw, but its mostly a limitation of my holster. When carried strong side I can't reliably draw without getting caught up, so I experimented moving it around ended up a cross draw about 10 works best.

    In the end its a choice of spending money I don't have on another holster, or cross draw, for now its cross draw.

  12. #12
    Regular Member sraacke's Avatar
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    I am a big guy and cross draw means reaching round my gut with isn't the easiest way to draw for me. Also, as others mentioned, it places the gun right up front where it's hard to control. I carry in a level 3 holster (Uncle Mikes Pro 3) and practice retention and draws with this on my strong side at about 4o'clock.
    OK, I speak for myself and pass on what I have heard from others when I mention this next reason.....
    One other hit against cross draw is a situation unique to Louisiana and those of us who OC regularly here have to deal with it. It's in regards to a rather dubious OCer who was arrested, filed suit againt the PD and won and became the defacto posterboy for OC here in La. The problem is, his Uberpatriotism and abrasive attitude turned many against this OCer who wore a .357 revolver crossdraw style. As Open Carry is largley about perception and winning of hearts and minds, many of us perfer not to be cast in the same mold as the crossdraw OCer I speak of. OCing crossdraw has become a target of the antiOC types on some gun discussion forums and whenever a negative OC incident occurs a sarcastic "Was the guy wearing it Crossdraw?" is sometimes tossed around.

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    hpancho,

    You've addressed a concern for many. Seated in a vehicle. Finding a suitable on-person location for a holster that won't be hindered by a seatbelt is difficult. I'd like to present an important point on the cross-draw for this specific situation as I've gone over this many times before back in 2003 when I served at Ft. Benning.

    Seated in a vehicle, should a threat come up to the driver's door (depending on what side you holster on) it's going to be difficult to reach for that firearm without being noticed. It's not impossible, it's just difficult. There's simply no subtle way to draw. Should that threat enter your vehicle from that side your firearm is then exposed to the threat...easily obtainable by that threat.

    Seated in a vehicle, should a threat come up to your passenger door (depending on what side you holster on) it may be more difficult to reach for that firearm as most of your body is exposed and visible. Drawing to target will be difficult as the threat will have the ability to see it coming as well as the ability to avoid it...but that's the intent isn't it. Should that threat enter your vehicle from the passenger side you're done. The only way of drawing and getting on target will be to cause a major distraction if the threat is inside the vehicle and on the passenger side.

    It's a tough challenge to address in any fashion and some of the above can apply no matter your format of carry and location on your person or within the vehicle.

  14. #14
    Regular Member okboomer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by REALteach4u View Post
    hpancho,

    You've addressed a concern for many. Seated in a vehicle. Finding a suitable on-person location for a holster that won't be hindered by a seatbelt is difficult. I'd like to present an important point on the cross-draw for this specific situation as I've gone over this many times before back in 2003 when I served at Ft. Benning.

    Seated in a vehicle, should a threat come up to the driver's door (depending on what side you holster on) it's going to be difficult to reach for that firearm without being noticed. It's not impossible, it's just difficult. There's simply no subtle way to draw. Should that threat enter your vehicle from that side your firearm is then exposed to the threat...easily obtainable by that threat.

    Seated in a vehicle, should a threat come up to your passenger door (depending on what side you holster on) it may be more difficult to reach for that firearm as most of your body is exposed and visible. Drawing to target will be difficult as the threat will have the ability to see it coming as well as the ability to avoid it...but that's the intent isn't it. Should that threat enter your vehicle from the passenger side you're done. The only way of drawing and getting on target will be to cause a major distraction if the threat is inside the vehicle and on the passenger side.

    It's a tough challenge to address in any fashion and some of the above can apply no matter your format of carry and location on your person or within the vehicle.
    I went through this training at my tactical pistol course and there is no real "answer" other than situational awareness and being in Condition Red whenever a stranger approaches your vehicle AT ANY TIME. The most effective deterrent is to be aware of what is going on around you, being prepared (unholster your pistol, but do not brandish, whenever anyone approaches that you are the least bit suspicious of), and keeping the doors locked, and only lower the window an inch or two to talk to someone.

    Now, in reality, there are times I will actually take the pistol out of the holster and wedge it between the seat cushions (60/40 bench) just so it will be more accessable without me needing to disengage the seat belt that hinders a draw from my holster. In a lot of states, carrying a loaded pistol in the car (not in a holster on a person) is illegal, so check the local ordinances and laws before you consider doing this.

    Also, when deploying a pistol in a car, be VERY SURE that you can aim the gun where ever you need WITHOUT sweeping your lower extremities ... in otherwords, don't point the gun at your legs
    cheers - okboomer
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