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Thread: Reloading question

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    Regular Member Tony4310's Avatar
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    Reloading question

    I've been collecting spent 9mm cartage's and I was wondering where to get reloading equipment and bullets and primers? I won't get the equipment till tax time due to cost... Any help would be great.

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    Regular Member xdmcompact's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony4310 View Post
    I've been collecting spent 9mm cartage's and I was wondering where to get reloading equipment and bullets and primers? I won't get the equipment till tax time due to cost... Any help would be great.
    Numerous places Grafs Reloading in St. Charles, Cabela's, www.midwayusa.com, www.brownells.com, Top Gun in Imperial. Just to name a few.

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    Regular Member Tony4310's Avatar
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    I would buy the primers,bullets and powder if I knew someone that could reload or show me how too.

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    Do some shopping before you buy your equipment. Try and find a few places in your area that have reloading equipment set up so you can look at it and play with it a little. You will need to decide if you want a single stage press or a multi-stage press. Budget may help decide this for you.

    Keep in mind that brass should only be loaded no more than 7 times due to case stretching and reforming. Also price your materials vs the cost of buying factory loads. You may find that unless you are wanting to guarantee the measure of powder in your shot, it may be cheaper or easier to buy the factory stuff.

    Other than that, enjoy reloading, I find it relaxing.

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    Regular Member Tony4310's Avatar
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    I was thinking about using reload as self defense rounds and that way I have plenty stocked up.

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    Regular Member afcarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony4310 View Post
    I was thinking about using reload as self defense rounds and that way I have plenty stocked up.
    Think very very carefully before you reload for PD. Its a personal choice, but there is something to consider when load for PD. And that is lawsuits. If there is ever a question about your defensive use of deadly force and you go to court, the prosecution will exploit that fact as much as possible, claiming that "You make extra-high-power-super-deadly bullets because you brutally and heartlessly planned the murder of the poor unfortunate soul when he was only trying to stab you because they were trying to feed their poor unfortunate family." Some do it anyway because they believe that the lawsuit is not a concern since they defended their family or themselves to the best of their ability. Just something to think about.

    Also Bass Pro will have some reloading supplied and equipment, and www.natchezss.com
    Last edited by afcarry; 07-19-2011 at 05:25 PM.
    An individual should not choose the caliber, cartridge, and bullet that will kill an an animal when everything is right; rather, he should choose ones that will kill the most efficiently when everything goes wrong

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    Hard to beat cheap ammo.

    It's hard to load 9mm and beat some of the prices you can get on the cheap stuff. WWB 9mm is around $20/100. 40, 45, 357, and even some 38 will save you some money, but without also casting your own bullets it really is hard to reload 9mm and have less in it than cheaper factory ammo.

    223 on the other hand... I save tons reloading that, and just about any rifle caliber. I get a lot of stuff from natchezss.com and midwayusa.com.

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    Regular Member Tony4310's Avatar
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    I find $10 boxes of 50 9mm at Cabela's and it shoots very well.
    Last edited by Tony4310; 07-20-2011 at 08:39 AM. Reason: typo

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    Regular Member Tony4310's Avatar
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    Could not the same be said if you bought HP rounds 3 or 4 boxes at a time?

    Quote Originally Posted by afcarry View Post
    Think very very carefully before you reload for PD. Its a personal choice, but there is something to consider when load for PD. And that is lawsuits. If there is ever a question about your defensive use of deadly force and you go to court, the prosecution will exploit that fact as much as possible, claiming that "You make extra-high-power-super-deadly bullets because you brutally and heartlessly planned the murder of the poor unfortunate soul when he was only trying to stab you because they were trying to feed their poor unfortunate family." Some do it anyway because they believe that the lawsuit is not a concern since they defended their family or themselves to the best of their ability. Just something to think about.

    Also Bass Pro will have some reloading supplied and equipment, and www.natchezss.com

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    Regular Member afcarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony4310 View Post
    Could not the same be said if you bought HP rounds 3 or 4 boxes at a time?
    Their misguided logic is that you created them for the explicit purpose of avoiding manufacturers' "less lethal than yours" loads. Another possible reason would be for forensics. They may check powder burn patterns and such, but with reloads that you made in you living room, basement, garage or whatever they will have absolutely no baseline, thus producing different results. I have yet to see for myself a case where any of this is addressed, but it is of some concern to many people. It makes no sense to me, since most reloaders don't load to max SAAMI pressure specifications (for example, I sometimes load down a couple grains or so in order to reduce stress on my weapons), but that's something that would be difficult to prove beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law. Like I said, it makes no sense, but its something to consider.
    Last edited by afcarry; 07-19-2011 at 06:57 PM.
    An individual should not choose the caliber, cartridge, and bullet that will kill an an animal when everything is right; rather, he should choose ones that will kill the most efficiently when everything goes wrong

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    Hey tony. you are in luck.

    I am a huge reloading fan and you are welcome to bring a few hundred over and try a press before you buy, I have no issue with it at all.

    Graff & Sons reloading is the best reloading shop in st louis, they are not much of a gun shop but they have just about everything you can dream of for reloading.

    70 west to 5th street in st chuck, veer right, down the hill and heading back up the hill 5th is 4 lane and drops to 2 right in front of graffs, turn left just past em and the parking lot is in back.

    I have a few thousand to get caught up on so you are welcome to check my set up out without even buying primers or stuff just to see if you like it before you buy it. I have a dillon, my buddy has a lee and those are the two most popular presses but there are other quality units as well.

    Feel free to give me a call and we can set up a time and date if you would like.

    I gotta warn you though, it is addicting and you shoot a LOT more once you get into it.
    John C. Eastman Associate Dean of Chapman University’s School of Law "the Second Amendment, like its sister amendments, does not confer a right but rather recognizes a natural right inherent in our humanity."

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    Regular Member mmdkyoung123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMTD View Post
    Hey tony. you are in luck.

    I am a huge reloading fan and you are welcome to bring a few hundred over and try a press before you buy, I have no issue with it at all.

    Graff & Sons reloading is the best reloading shop in st louis, they are not much of a gun shop but they have just about everything you can dream of for reloading.

    70 west to 5th street in st chuck, veer right, down the hill and heading back up the hill 5th is 4 lane and drops to 2 right in front of graffs, turn left just past em and the parking lot is in back.

    I have a few thousand to get caught up on so you are welcome to check my set up out without even buying primers or stuff just to see if you like it before you buy it. I have a dillon, my buddy has a lee and those are the two most popular presses but there are other quality units as well.

    Feel free to give me a call and we can set up a time and date if you would like.

    I gotta warn you though, it is addicting and you shoot a LOT more once you get into it.
    I have been thinking about doing the reloading thing but have NO experience with it. I was hoping you might be able to give me some insight since you have experience with it. I like to shoot and try to go once to twice a month but would like to go once a week or more if I could afford it.
    My primary carry guns are .40 and .45. Would reloading save enough on ammo to make it worth it? How hard is it and what is a realistic start up cost? Is this something I can do at the workbench in the garage?
    Sorry if these are stupid questions. I grew up shooting and hunting with my dad but we always just bought our ammo. It's getting to be cost prohibitive to go to often now even buying it bulk when I can so I would like to find a way to fix that if possible. Especially since my son is getting old enough to start shooting and my wife is FINALLY starting to like it also. Thanks for any advice you can give!!

    Mike

    (edited for spelling)
    Last edited by mmdkyoung123; 07-19-2011 at 08:09 PM.

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    Regular Member afcarry's Avatar
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    (My primary carry guns are .40 and .45.) Mine too! Let's be friends. I also reload 9mm, 7.62x54R and 6.5 Creedmoor, though.
    (Would reloading save enough on ammo to make it worth it?) With the .40, just barely, but yes. With the .45, definitely yes.
    How hard is it and what is a realistic start up cost?) Its not difficult, just pay attention to details. As for the cost, that's extremely subjective. If you were to buy all Lee equipment, it wouldn't be all that much. Other higher quality equipment can run you much more. With Lee, you can start basic reloading for about 200 or so. Very rough estimate. I have mostly Redding equipment, so I spent about 700. I don't know of another manufacturer that makes better equipment though. Dillon, Redding and Forster are outstanding brands. Hornady is pretty good, Lyman and RCBS are okay, and I PERSONALLY wont buy anything Lee.
    (Is this something I can do at the workbench in the garage?) I do, so I guess so. Make sure you store your powder, primers and dies in a dry place though, away from the humidity. The dies may rust, the powder and primers may fail when needed.
    Last edited by afcarry; 07-19-2011 at 08:45 PM.
    An individual should not choose the caliber, cartridge, and bullet that will kill an an animal when everything is right; rather, he should choose ones that will kill the most efficiently when everything goes wrong

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmdkyoung123 View Post
    I have been thinking about doing the reloading thing but have NO experience with it. I was hoping you might be able to give me some insight since you have experience with it. I like to shoot and try to go once to twice a month but would like to go once a week or more if I could afford it.
    My primary carry guns are .40 and .45. Would reloading save enough on ammo to make it worth it? How hard is it and what is a realistic start up cost? Is this something I can do at the workbench in the garage?

    Thanks for any advice you can give!!

    Mike

    (edited for spelling)
    No question about reloading is stupid, especially after you start.

    If you are shooting that often then IMHO it would indeed pay off to reload.

    Here is the deal, there is a start up cost, depending on options and desires it can be fairly inexpensive all the way up to a big expense.

    From the bullet alone perspective, yes it pays off. I buy in bulk because I shoot a lot and I do reload primarily for cost reduction though I have played with rounds a little on accuracy and velocity adjustments etc.

    the last time I priced it out I was making 9's for about 9.5 cents and 45 for around 12.5 however cost have indeed gone up a bit since then, I would estimate you could add 35% on top of that from my last bulk purchase. I think the best way you could estimate the pay off beyond one of the online calculators where you enter prices is to price out the ammo you are using per month, times it by 12 and then divide that figure in half and you will be close to the cost savings.

    I personally would tell anyone considering it, you will not get fast enough payback on everything to justify the cost savings unless you shoot a bunch and it is not worth it at all on that alone. What you have to realize is it is NOT a fast process and unless you enjoy doing it you are some what wasting your money.

    Why? Because while if you get a fast press you can produce about 400 rounds per hour after set up. You can do more than that, but there are reasons you will not want to go too fast, there is some what of an art to it which develops quickly, most folks I have introduced to it get about 200 rounds the first hour and are up to 400 in the second or third hour they do it. I would estimate it takes me 30 minutes to set up and take off, it would be about the same to switch from 9 to 45 but I paid for that speed and ease, it just depends on how a person wants to do it.

    When I go to the range I shoot a lot, I mean a whole lot, more than a great many people shoot in a life time. It is not uncommon to take 5 to 10k in 9mm and 5k in 45 and about 5k in 223 and we tend to shoot pretty much all of it over 8 or 10 hours there are usally several persons with me shooting so it is not as much as it sounds like it is at all.

    More later family emergency
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    Quote Originally Posted by afcarry View Post
    (My primary carry guns are .40 and .45.) Mine too! Let's be friends. I also reload 9mm, 7.62x54R and 6.5 Creedmoor, though.
    (Would reloading save enough on ammo to make it worth it?) With the .40, just barely, but yes. With the .45, definitely yes.
    How hard is it and what is a realistic start up cost?) Its not difficult, just pay attention to details. As for the cost, that's extremely subjective. If you were to buy all Lee equipment, it wouldn't be all that much. Other higher quality equipment can run you much more. With Lee, you can start basic reloading for about 200 or so. Very rough estimate. I have mostly Redding equipment, so I spent about 700. I don't know of another manufacturer that makes better equipment though. Dillon, Redding and Forster are outstanding brands. Hornady is pretty good, Lyman and RCBS are okay, and I PERSONALLY wont buy anything Lee.
    (Is this something I can do at the workbench in the garage?) I do, so I guess so. Make sure you store your powder, primers and dies in a dry place though, away from the humidity. The dies may rust, the powder and primers may fail when needed.
    I also do my reloading in the garage, before I got married I used to do reloading in the living room on a special reloading table I put together. However the wife didn't like the idea of pressing primers and powder in the living room so I have been moved to the garage. Primers and powder stay in the house and the dies I keep in the garage with the press. Haven't had any issue with rusting.

    I currently have a single stage RCBS press and like their stuff, however I am probably a bit biased as the press I have I inherited from my father. I have looked at both the Dillon and the RCBS multi-stage presses but they are so pricey I haven't made the commitment to those yet. Only problem I have ever had with the RCBS stuff is I kept breaking de-capper pins on my 223 dies. Called up RCBS and they sent me 3 extras for no charge. Then I realized I had picked up some rounds that had berdan primers in them. Not sure how many I can get out in an hour once I get everything set, but could do a lot more with a multi stage press though

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmdkyoung123 View Post
    I have been thinking about doing the reloading thing but have NO experience with it. I was hoping you might be able to give me some insight since you have experience with it. I like to shoot and try to go once to twice a month but would like to go once a week or more if I could afford it.
    My primary carry guns are .40 and .45. Would reloading save enough on ammo to make it worth it? How hard is it and what is a realistic start up cost? Is this something I can do at the workbench in the garage?
    Sorry if these are stupid questions. I grew up shooting and hunting with my dad but we always just bought our ammo. It's getting to be cost prohibitive to go to often now even buying it bulk when I can so I would like to find a way to fix that if possible. Especially since my son is getting old enough to start shooting and my wife is FINALLY starting to like it also. Thanks for any advice you can give!!

    Mike

    (edited for spelling)
    I'm going to be in independence all next week for training with little going on after training each day. I also shoot 45acp 99% of the time. I've got 500 to reload and intended to bring my reloading gear with me. Be happy to show you how to do it and the steps and equipment needed.

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    Regular Member Tony4310's Avatar
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    That is a big reason I want to reload is because I want to start shooting more,plus it would come in handy in an emergency or disaster.

    Quote Originally Posted by LMTD View Post
    Hey tony. you are in luck.

    I am a huge reloading fan and you are welcome to bring a few hundred over and try a press before you buy, I have no issue with it at all.

    Graff & Sons reloading is the best reloading shop in st louis, they are not much of a gun shop but they have just about everything you can dream of for reloading.

    70 west to 5th street in st chuck, veer right, down the hill and heading back up the hill 5th is 4 lane and drops to 2 right in front of graffs, turn left just past em and the parking lot is in back.

    I have a few thousand to get caught up on so you are welcome to check my set up out without even buying primers or stuff just to see if you like it before you buy it. I have a dillon, my buddy has a lee and those are the two most popular presses but there are other quality units as well.

    Feel free to give me a call and we can set up a time and date if you would like.

    I gotta warn you though, it is addicting and you shoot a LOT more once you get into it.

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    on a side note, i used spent 30-06 or my 7.62x54r shells and put them on my truck antenna.

    bam! perfect antenna decor
    Constantly choosing the lesser of two evils is still choosing evil.

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    Regular Member mmdkyoung123's Avatar
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    Shooter,
    I appreciate the offer, however I will be heading to Michigan tonight after work for vacation. I appreciate all the info everyone has given me so far. I think I will look at getting a cheap set up to start and see how I like it and how much it saves me, and then look at getting a better set up in a year or so. someone feel free to let me know if that is a bad idea however

    Mike

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    Regular Member afcarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kylemoul View Post
    on a side note, i used spent 30-06 or my 7.62x54r shells and put them on my truck antenna.
    Truly American decor. Thumbs up.
    Last edited by afcarry; 07-22-2011 at 05:06 PM.
    An individual should not choose the caliber, cartridge, and bullet that will kill an an animal when everything is right; rather, he should choose ones that will kill the most efficiently when everything goes wrong

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    Regular Member Phoenix David's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrdware View Post
    Keep in mind that brass should only be loaded no more than 7 times due to case stretching and reforming. Also price your materials vs the cost of buying factory loads. You may find that unless you are wanting to guarantee the measure of powder in your shot, it may be cheaper or easier to buy the factory stuff.Other than that, enjoy reloading, I find it relaxing.
    In my 20 years of reloading I have not found a limit of 7 reloaded per case. Each one is different, you need to inspect each case when loading it. I have 9mm cases that I have been using since 2000 and they are perfectily fine
    Last edited by Phoenix David; 07-22-2011 at 06:24 PM. Reason: formating
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    Gotta agree with David, I know folks who set the bar at 12 to 15 reloads.

    There are significant differences in rifle loading and pistol. Rifle cartridges have a lot more case distortion each time fired than pistol. That is why you will find yourself purchasing a case trimmer if you do rifle stuff but you will not use one on pistol loads etc.

    I like using polishers vs ultra sonic to clean brass so cracks remain visible, with an ultra sonic you may clean the crack of fouling and it might not be easy to see like it is with surface polishing.

    Purchased brass like starline is going to be a very sound brass good for a great many loads. If you were reloading for economy aka light loads then you could easily see quality pistol brass lasting several loads even beyond 20 and still not be overly dangerous to use. If you are going to load +p levels then you may indeed see signs of brass stress after 5 to 10.

    357 is a popular load with huge variables, some folks will go with a very slow burn high pressure to increase muzzle flash on purpose, others will load to minimize it, others will load for low pressure 38 rounds or 357 rounds with wad cutters for reduced recoil and others high velocity for long distance shooting etc.

    The life span of 357 brass in the above would be quite varied by application and what worked for one would not work for the other so it remains what it is, variable.

    I load pistol rounds for economy and rifle for accuracy today but when I start loading 223 on a regular basis it will be economy to feed the auto-loader aka ar-15 and I will vary the 357 for fun to determine varied goals, the brass life will vary accordingly.
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    I knew I had a link some place, here is a good cost calculator:

    http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp
    John C. Eastman Associate Dean of Chapman University’s School of Law "the Second Amendment, like its sister amendments, does not confer a right but rather recognizes a natural right inherent in our humanity."

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    Regular Member Tony4310's Avatar
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    How long would it take to reload 420 rounds?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony4310 View Post
    How long would it take to reload 420 rounds?
    Of what and on what press?

    Of 45 or 9mm I could do it in about 1 hour on my Dillim 550, on a Lee progressive press close to the same. On something like a rock chucker single stage, I would guess a little over 3 hours. The difference is, one pull of the handle on the dillon or lee does 4 things, on a single stage it does 1 thing so to speak.

    On rifle stuff some might say it is the same, I do not find that to be the case. Since I reload for a lever gun, it is very critical that the bullet be near perfect or it will not close the breech, means the cases MUST be checked and trimmed if needed. While I do them on the progressive press, I do it a LOT slower and perform far far more checks while doing them.

    I am actually considering getting a rock chucker single stage just for rifle loading because the handle pulls are not what slows it down, it is the checking of each and every step that gets it done right. I never load much over 30 rifle cartridges at a time anyway.

    Again Tony, if you want to see how it is done and load up that 420 you have sitting around (anyone besides me wondering about that 420 reference? He has a thing for assless chaps ya know!) you are welcome to come over and do them here. Run by graff's or cabellas, get whatever bullet you want (I load lead round nose for 9 and 230 semi wad cutter for 45 myself) price out the small and large pistol primers per thousand winchester brand and winchester 231 powder by the pound and you can use my supplies and you can just pay for what you use. In other words I may not have any bullets down stairs but I have powder and primers, if that is 10 cents per cartridge you can give me 40 bucks or whatever the total comes to be. The bullet is the expesive piece at around 35 busk for 500.

    Tomorrow prior to the pacific event would be good, my lovely maiden has to go in to work at 3pm for inventory and won't be able to come, we could load those up and then cruise over to the event and you could ride over to pacific with me if you want to, I am near 40 and 70 aka wentzville. I will PM you my phone number but it will not get answered after 11 today until about 4 or 5 since I am taking the kids to the pool again today.
    John C. Eastman Associate Dean of Chapman University’s School of Law "the Second Amendment, like its sister amendments, does not confer a right but rather recognizes a natural right inherent in our humanity."

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