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Thread: Trying to help a neighbor now I have questions

  1. #1
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    Trying to help a neighbor now I have questions

    Ok folks a neighbor of mine asked me to hold on to a pistol(he is a permit holder) for him because his he and his wife are going thru some issues. He and his wife thought it would be better if the pistol was out of the house so i said that i would lock it in my safe until things blew over. This was 2 weeks ago, well, last night i came home from work to find police @ there house next door. It seems that he put his hands on her and was arrested, the police were informed that i had his pistol and i was told by them to just leave it locked up for now. This morning he was charged and a restraining order was issued on him. Now, I dont know what the options are and if his permit is revoked what he/ i should do with the pistol. I do not feel that at this time in good conceince that i could hand the gun back to him. Any ideas would help. By the way i an a pistol permit holder and also a NRA pistol instructor but have never crossed this bridge.

    Thank you,

    Erick

  2. #2
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    Well, actually, it isn't good for him to take it either.

    You really did a decent thing and it probably looks better for him in the long run that he has done this before the restraining order was issued.

    I'd say you may get contacted to relinquish the firearm to the local authorities (possible). If so, take a receipt and leave it at that.

    I wouldn't relinquish without the receipt and I'd give your neighbor a copy. Too often you hear of people not getting receipts for firearms transferred to the authorities and it just causes a whole huge mess.

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

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    Thank you for the advise, I will talk to the owner of the pistol tonight and let him know. I will ask him to look into it also and see if there are more option but, it will not be returned to him with what is going on.

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    Regular Member brk913's Avatar
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    If he is willing to he can transfer the gun to you, it's better than turning it over to the PD. You will need to fill out the appropriate forms and call for an authorization number. Then if his rights are restored you can transfer it back to him. If he winds up being ineligible permanently he could have you sell the gun and give him the money...
    Last edited by brk913; 08-16-2011 at 03:06 PM.

  5. #5
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brk913 View Post
    If he is willing to he can transfer the gun to you, it's better than turning it over to the PD. You will need to fill out the appropriate forms and call for an authorization number. Then if his rights are restored you can transfer it back to him. If he winds up being ineligible permanently he could have you sell the gun and give him the money...
    This is also a good option and prevents the LEO's from "losing" them. Happens ALL the time.

    Also, most restraining orders are temporary and don't get renewed (even without having to formally have them stopped). If it's a TRO, after the time period is over, he will be free to go about his life as usual.

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

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    Offical Transfer

    The system , SPFLU is going to be looking for the gun's and for offical action to be taken either turn them in or offically transfer them! I'm suprised the local PD dident tell you to give them up considering they are still in his name, and if he was your good friend, you might give them back, and he goes and smokes his old lady they would be in big trouble then for not tying up the loose ends, ie dps transfer paperwork, or surrender!
    Dont quote me i belive there is a 72 hour window for transfer! Every time i got hit & served tro, the pd took my stuff on the spot, inclunding my permit!

    PD may come knockin on your door!

    anyone home!

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    Exclamation

    It's a pretty sad state of affairs when a man can be deprived of a fundamental, natural, constitutionally-protected right based only on an allegation and without getting his day in court.

    This is not directed at the OP; you need to do what you have to do to protect yourself legally. This is just an observation on our "justice" system and its gross overreaction to charges of DV.
    Last edited by ManInBlack; 08-17-2011 at 09:47 AM.

  8. #8
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    Ok, today after i get out of work i will be meeting the owner of the pistol at the PD to do a paperwork transfer and get the pistol in my name. When the tro is done i will tranfer it back to him or if he is not able to get it back i will either buy it from him or sell it and give him the money. The police stopped by my house yesterday and asked my girlfriend if we were the neighbor that had the firearm, she said yes and asked if they wanted it... The officer said no, not at this point and took off. The owner of the pistol said that the police are going to do the transfer.. i didnt know that they could do that...

  9. #9
    Regular Member brk913's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erick212 View Post
    The owner of the pistol said that the police are going to do the transfer.. i didnt know that they could do that...
    They probably just want to witness you do the paperwork and call for an authorization number, I doubt they will actually "do the transfer"....

  10. #10
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brk913 View Post
    They probably just want to witness you do the paperwork and call for an authorization number, I doubt they will actually "do the transfer"....
    That's what I'm thinking.

    I actually commend the officer in this case for doing a good job.

    Curious, what town (if you don't mind). Always nice to know towns that do things proper!

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

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    It is in Bristol. The police in town seem to be pretty good about doing things the right way. How can i call for an auth # i dont have my FFL, i didnt know that i could do that. I can however bring it to Wolf's range or somewere if necessary.

  12. #12
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    No need, here you go:

    Go to the DPS website (man, I hope we don't have to update our bookmarks since they are no longer called DPS!) and get form DPS-3-C:

    http://www.ct.gov/dps/lib/dps/specia...ms/dps-3-c.pdf

    You and he will fill out this form together. Once the form is filled out, call the number on the form and get an authorization number.

    After you have the authorization number, the firearm is transferred to you. The only thing you need to do now is drop off a copy of the DPS-3-C to the local PD and one to DPS and you're all set.

    Not all that difficult really.

    Hope this clears things up for ya,

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

  13. #13
    Regular Member brk913's Avatar
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    Please go here to read the process: http://www.ct.gov/dps/cwp/view.asp?a...94488&dpsNav=| scroll down to Private Sales of Firearms.
    In addition to 4 copies of the DPS-3-C you also need a DPS-67-C. You will see the instructions on how to call for a number and where to send the copies of your paperwork to.
    Last edited by brk913; 08-17-2011 at 03:04 PM.

  14. #14
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    DPS 67-C, as I understand it is if you purchase the firearm, not for a transfer.

    I called DPS and spoke to someone before I wrote down what I did.......

    That's what she said.

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

  15. #15
    Regular Member brk913's Avatar
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    Transfering a firearm is the same as selling it, from the link above ( http://www.ct.gov/dps/cwp/view.asp?a...94488&dpsNav=| ):

    Private Sale of Firearms

    Pistols and Revolvers
    Federal Law states you may only buy a handgun in the state in which you reside.

    You can only buy a handgun in Connecticut, if in addition to being a resident, you have a valid Permit to carry Pistols or Revolvers, a valid Eligibility Certificate, if you are a licensed Firearms Dealer or if you are a Sworn Police Officer.

    A DPS-67-C and a DPS-3-C (4 copies) must be completed. The seller of the handgun must contact the Special Licensing and Firearms Unit at (860) 685-8400, or 1-(888) 335-8438 and obtain an authorization number for that sale. This number is to be added to both forms. The DPS-67-C is to be retained by the seller for 20 years. The seller should retain the original copy of the DPS-3 for their records, give one copy to the purchaser as a receipt, submit one copy to the local police authority where the purchaser resides and submit a final copy to the Commissioner of Public Safety.

  16. #16
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    Again.... I can read that brother!

    That link doesn't say that a transfer is the same as a sale.

    the DPS-67-C is an application to purchase. As worded, on the document itself, would constitute a sale of the firearm.

    DPS-3-C is a transfer so the state and local government know where the firearm is.

    The OP stated that he was transferring first while a TRO expired and if it was renewed as a RO, then he was going to purchase.

    Yes, DPS-3-C needs four copies. One for each party, one for the local authority of the person taking possession and one for the state.

    I did verify with DPS.

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

  17. #17
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    For the original poster:

    Look at the phone number on the DPS-3-C.

    Call that number and ask the person on the other end, get a name and you'll be straight.

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

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    The transfer went smooth last night, paperwork filled out, auth # given, droped a copy off @ the PD and anither getting dropped off at DPS later today. Thank you all for the help and it was much smoother than i thought.

  19. #19
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    Good to know.

    CT really isn't as bad as many other states when it comes to this side of things. We have a few other paperwork issues (like a shop keeping a log even longer than the feds require! - and a separate log at that).

    Overall, not bad.

    I have a firearms problem, I buy but never sell 'em!

    I picked up a Bersa .40 for my mother and finally did the paperwork last month, took only a few minutes and went rather well.

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

  20. #20
    Regular Member brk913's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    Again.... I can read that brother!

    That link doesn't say that a transfer is the same as a sale.

    the DPS-67-C is an application to purchase. As worded, on the document itself, would constitute a sale of the firearm.

    DPS-3-C is a transfer so the state and local government know where the firearm is.

    The OP stated that he was transferring first while a TRO expired and if it was renewed as a RO, then he was going to purchase.

    Yes, DPS-3-C needs four copies. One for each party, one for the local authority of the person taking possession and one for the state.

    I did verify with DPS.

    Jonathan
    You are correct the link does not specifically state that a sale is the same as a transfer but it is. I don't know who you are relying on at DPS to give you the proper info but they are wrong. Private sale/transer is the same thing according to state statutes. In fact the DPS-67-C states the statute for reference on the document itself. See specifically 29-33 section C which calls for the DPS-67-C and section E which calls for the DPS-3-C:

    (c) No person, firm or corporation shall sell, deliver or otherwise transfer any pistol or revolver except upon written application on a form prescribed and furnished by the Commissioner of Public Safety. Such person, firm or corporation shall insure that all questions on the application are answered properly prior to releasing the pistol or revolver and shall retain the application, which shall be attached to the federal sale or transfer document, for at least twenty years or until such vendor goes out of business. Such application shall be available for inspection during normal business hours by law enforcement officials. No sale, delivery or other transfer of any pistol or revolver shall be made unless the person making the purchase or to whom the same is delivered or transferred is personally known to the person selling such pistol or revolver or making delivery or transfer thereof or provides evidence of his identity in the form of a motor vehicle operator's license, identity card issued pursuant to section 1-1h or valid passport. No sale, delivery or other transfer of any pistol or revolver shall be made until the person, firm or corporation making such transfer obtains an authorization number from the Commissioner of Public Safety. Said commissioner shall perform the national instant criminal background check and make a reasonable effort to determine whether there is any reason that would prohibit such applicant from possessing a pistol or revolver as provided in section 53a-217c. If the commissioner determines the existence of such a reason, the commissioner shall deny the sale and no pistol or revolver shall be sold, delivered or otherwise transferred by such person, firm or corporation to such applicant.

    (e) Upon the sale, delivery or other transfer of any pistol or revolver, the person making the purchase or to whom the same is delivered or transferred shall sign a receipt for such pistol or revolver which shall contain the name and address of such person, the date of sale, the caliber, make, model and manufacturer's number and a general description of such pistol or revolver, the identification number of such person's permit to carry pistols or revolvers, issued pursuant to subsection (b) of section 29-28, permit to sell at retail pistols or revolvers, issued pursuant to subsection (a) of said section, or eligibility certificate for a pistol or revolver, issued pursuant to section 29-36f, if any, and the authorization number designated for the transfer by the Department of Public Safety. The person, firm or corporation selling such pistol or revolver or making delivery or transfer thereof shall give one copy of the receipt to the person making the purchase of such pistol or revolver or to whom the same is delivered or transferred, shall retain one copy of the receipt for at least five years, and shall send, by first class mail, or electronically transmit, within forty-eight hours of such sale, delivery or other transfer, one copy of the receipt to the Commissioner of Public Safety and one copy of the receipt to the chief of police or, where there is no chief of police, the warden of the borough or the first selectman of the town, as the case may be, of the town in which the transferee resides.

  21. #21
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brk913 View Post
    You are correct the link does not specifically state that a sale is the same as a transfer but it is. I don't know who you are relying on at DPS to give you the proper info but they are wrong. Private sale/transer is the same thing according to state statutes. In fact the DPS-67-C states the statute for reference on the document itself. See specifically 29-33 section C which calls for the DPS-67-C and section E which calls for the DPS-3-C:

    (c) No person, firm or corporation shall sell, deliver or otherwise transfer any pistol or revolver except upon written application on a form prescribed and furnished by the Commissioner of Public Safety. Such person, firm or corporation shall insure that all questions on the application are answered properly prior to releasing the pistol or revolver and shall retain the application, which shall be attached to the federal sale or transfer document, for at least twenty years or until such vendor goes out of business. Such application shall be available for inspection during normal business hours by law enforcement officials. No sale, delivery or other transfer of any pistol or revolver shall be made unless the person making the purchase or to whom the same is delivered or transferred is personally known to the person selling such pistol or revolver or making delivery or transfer thereof or provides evidence of his identity in the form of a motor vehicle operator's license, identity card issued pursuant to section 1-1h or valid passport. No sale, delivery or other transfer of any pistol or revolver shall be made until the person, firm or corporation making such transfer obtains an authorization number from the Commissioner of Public Safety. Said commissioner shall perform the national instant criminal background check and make a reasonable effort to determine whether there is any reason that would prohibit such applicant from possessing a pistol or revolver as provided in section 53a-217c. If the commissioner determines the existence of such a reason, the commissioner shall deny the sale and no pistol or revolver shall be sold, delivered or otherwise transferred by such person, firm or corporation to such applicant.
    You still have NOT shown where both forms are required. One form is a transfer, the other is a sale.

    The statutes are indeed listed on the paperwork, so we are in agreement there.

    Where are they the same thing? Where does the statute say that (look at what you copied above.... it doesn't say it ANYWHERE!).

    Where is 29-33 Section C calling for the DPS-67-C? Written application is the form you fill out, does not mean the purchase form we are debating here. An application is simply a form. One is for a sale, the other is required for sale and transfer.

    Section C states all the info that must be recorded, all of which are on the DPS-3-C (authorization number, sale info, etc).

    In fact, what do you do with the DPS-67-C?

    I just called again, spoke to a different person and I got the same result. The DPS-3-C is required and absolute. The other wasn't "required" but "good to have". Like that says anything.

    I think we can agree on one thing, this statute needs better clarification between the two forms SPECIFICALLY so this confusion doesn't happen.

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

  22. #22
    Regular Member brk913's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    You still have NOT shown where both forms are required. One form is a transfer, the other is a sale.

    The statutes are indeed listed on the paperwork, so we are in agreement there.
    I believe I DID show you where both forms are required. Again, statute 29-33 go read the whole statute (you cannot just use parts of the statute, you must follow it in its entirety, it clearly calls for you to fill out both forms, section c and section e.): http://www.cga.ct.gov/2011/pub/chap529.htm#Sec29-33.htm

    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    Where are they the same thing? Where does the statute say that (look at what you copied above.... it doesn't say it ANYWHERE!).
    State statute does not shows any difference between, selling, delivering or transfering nor any difference for being a person, firm or corporation, they are treated the same.

    "(c) No person, firm or corporation shall sell, deliver or otherwise transfer any pistol or revolver "

    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    Where is 29-33 Section C calling for the DPS-67-C?
    You need to read section C again, you will notice it states "all questions are answered properly" form DPS-67-C is the only form with questions (not listed by name in statute because DPS can name the form anything it wants).

    "upon written application on a form prescribed and furnished by the Commissioner of Public Safety. Such person, firm or corporation shall insure that all questions on the application are answered properly prior to releasing the pistol or revolver and shall retain the application, which shall be attached to the federal sale or transfer document, for at least twenty years"

    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    Written application is the form you fill out, does not mean the purchase form we are debating here. An application is simply a form. One is for a sale, the other is required for sale and transfer.Section C states all the info that must be recorded, all of which are on the DPS-3-C (authorization number, sale info, etc).
    Section e is what covers the DPS-3-C, it asks for information for the "receipt" and states the seller keeps one, the buyer gets one, the DPS gets one and the local PD of buyer gets one, since we know which we need to send to the DPS and local PD section e is clearly speaking of the DPS-3-c.

    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    In fact, what do you do with the DPS-67-C?
    Statute says "Such person, firm or corporation shall insure that all questions on the application are answered properly prior to releasing the pistol or revolver and shall retain the application, which shall be attached to the federal sale or transfer document, for at least twenty years". SO the seller will "retain it" just in case DPS or other LE wants to see it.


    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    I just called again, spoke to a different person and I got the same result. The DPS-3-C is required and absolute. The other wasn't "required" but "good to have". Like that says anything.
    I am guessing the people you spoke to are misunderstanding your question and are stating it is not required that they receive a copy. I can't believe after all I read here that you are taking legal advice from "someone" at DPS, did you ask them if it was OK to open carry while you were on the phone? Please take this statement in the tone it is intended, I am not trying to start a forum fight, I am just wondering why anyone from this forum would ask someone at the DPS or a LEO for clarification of the law.

    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    I think we can agree on one thing, this statute needs better clarification between the two forms SPECIFICALLY so this confusion doesn't happen.
    I read it very clear, it calls for anyone (individual, firm or corporation) who "sells, delivers or otherwise transfers" to follow section c + e not just e. Since section e speaks of sending the copies to the DPS and local PD we know that is the receipt, not the application and that is the DPS-3-C. This means the DPS-67-c is the application, just because DPS does not require to see it now does not mean they will not want to see it in 10 years if the gun shows up at a crime scene.

  23. #23
    Regular Member KIX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brk913 View Post
    You need to read section C again, you will notice it states "all questions are answered properly" form DPS-67-C is the only form with questions (not listed by name in statute because DPS can name the form anything it wants).

    "upon written application on a form prescribed and furnished by the Commissioner of Public Safety. Such person, firm or corporation shall insure that all questions on the application are answered properly prior to releasing the pistol or revolver and shall retain the application, which shall be attached to the federal sale or transfer document, for at least twenty years"
    First, I read it PLENTY, hence my argument over your interpretation.

    The quote above is EXACTLY my point. You are interpreting "all questions answered properly"........ This is my point, this is YOUR interpretation, not the law AS IT IS WRITTEN. Without the specificity, there is vagueness. And as long as the states paperwork clearly states SALE, there is an issue with the paperwork.

    I AGREE with what you are saying about individuals, firms, etc..... no need to keep repeating that one. The problem we have here with the law is selective interpretation, which can indeed be challenged.

    *****

    I'm not disputing the four copies bit either, so no need to rehash this.

    *****

    DPS is who you ask these questions to, special licensing. I have a record of who I spoke to, if challenged, I can bring that into the mix.

    *****

    the whole "ten year at a crime scene" bit is also moot. I have his signature, my signature, NICS verification number all on a form to document the transfer. I have what is required.

    *****

    What it boils down to is simple. You are interpreting it one way, I am interpreting it another. We both feel we are right, but I have at least made calls to verify.

    The problem with the laws is recycled language. They wrote it for a business, included the individual, but have poor language in general.

    I'm fine with my interpretation and will continue to do what I've been doing. If called on it, I'll fight it. If anything, it will mean that the statute needs to be a bit more specific with which form and which transaction SPECIFICALLY.

    Until then, all that is left is for it to be challenged and we can be free to disagree.

    Jonathan
    www.ctpistolpermitissues.com - tracking all the local issuing authority, DPS and other insanity with permit issues
    www.ctgunsafety.com - my blog and growing list of links useful to gun owners (especially in Connecticut).

    Rich B: My favorite argument against OC being legal in CT is "I have never seen someone OC in CT".
    I have never seen a person drink tea from a coke bottle while standing on their head, that doesn't mean it is illegal.

  24. #24
    Regular Member brk913's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIX View Post
    First, I read it PLENTY, hence my argument over your interpretation.

    The quote above is EXACTLY my point. You are interpreting "all questions answered properly"........ This is my point, this is YOUR interpretation, not the law AS IT IS WRITTEN. Without the specificity, there is vagueness. And as long as the states paperwork clearly states SALE, there is an issue with the paperwork.

    I AGREE with what you are saying about individuals, firms, etc..... no need to keep repeating that one. The problem we have here with the law is selective interpretation, which can indeed be challenged.

    *****

    I'm not disputing the four copies bit either, so no need to rehash this.

    *****

    DPS is who you ask these questions to, special licensing. I have a record of who I spoke to, if challenged, I can bring that into the mix.

    *****

    the whole "ten year at a crime scene" bit is also moot. I have his signature, my signature, NICS verification number all on a form to document the transfer. I have what is required.

    *****

    What it boils down to is simple. You are interpreting it one way, I am interpreting it another. We both feel we are right, but I have at least made calls to verify.

    The problem with the laws is recycled language. They wrote it for a business, included the individual, but have poor language in general.

    I'm fine with my interpretation and will continue to do what I've been doing. If called on it, I'll fight it. If anything, it will mean that the statute needs to be a bit more specific with which form and which transaction SPECIFICALLY.

    Until then, all that is left is for it to be challenged and we can be free to disagree.

    Jonathan
    As I know you are meeting with an Atty. soon I suggest you run it by him/her for clarfiication. The Legislature wrote the statute, it clearly states the intent is for you to fill out 2 forms upon the sale, delivery or transfer of a handgun, the receipt one for seller, one for buyer and 2 that are mailed to the DPS and Local PD, again this is obviously the DPS-3-C. The second an application where the buyer answers questions, clearly the DPS-67-C (even if whoever from DPS had it printed with Application to "PURCHASE" a firearm. It is clear this is what is referenced in section c of the statute, not sure how you can read this any differently. Even on the SLFU page it states,

    "Private Sale of Firearms

    Pistols and Revolvers
    Federal Law states you may only buy a handgun in the state in which you reside.

    You can only buy a handgun in Connecticut, if in addition to being a resident, you have a valid Permit to carry Pistols or Revolvers, a valid Eligibility Certificate, if you are a licensed Firearms Dealer or if you are a Sworn Police Officer.

    A DPS-67-C and a DPS-3-C (4 copies) must be completed."

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