Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Chicago police must pay 330k for home raid

  1. #1
    Founder's Club Member Jim675's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bellevue, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1,037

    Chicago police must pay 330k for home raid

    A federal jury says Chicago law enforcement must pay $330,000 to a family after officers shot their dog during a home raid that turned up no illegal activity.

    This is wonderful news. Hopefully once shooting dogs goes out of style we who carry in our homes might be made a bit safer as well.

    "According to NBC, the jury awarded $175,000 to Russell, $85,000 to his little brother, and $35,000 each to the brothers' parents. The officer who shot the dog owes $2,000 in damages, and his supervisor owes $1,000, according to NBC."

    That will make an impact!

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cherry Tree (Indiana County), Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    1,155
    The officer who shot the dog owes $2,000 in damages, and his supervisor owes $1,000,
    Hell has indeed froze over. A Chicago cop was actually held accountable for his actions. Amazing, simply amazing.

  3. #3
    Regular Member Wolfgang1952's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mt Hermon / Franklinton,La ,
    Posts
    173
    Do the Cops that did the shooting have to pay the money or does Chicago pay the fine?
    Pres. Florida Parishes Chapter of LOCAL www.laopencarry.org

    .308 Isn't an area code, but it can still make long distance calls.
    How may I help you? Press '1' for English. Press '2' to disconnect until you learn to speak English.


    Wolf

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cherry Tree (Indiana County), Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    1,155
    According to what was written in the news article, Chicago pays the bulk, but the officer and his supervisor pay on their own.

    That'll learn them.

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    204
    Chicago cops found erring? Told to pay? Is it a dream? WOW.

  6. #6
    Founder's Club Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Fairfax Co., VA
    Posts
    18,766
    I don't know this for a fact, but I'll bet shooting the dog had something to do with it.

    Lotsa mistaken raids happen, very little accountability. The Good Faith Exception is the equivalent of saying "good enough for government work."

    However, shoot a loveable Lab, when it isn't even being aggressive, and you've stood yourself out as a beast.

  7. #7
    Centurion
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Pleasant Grove, Utah, USA
    Posts
    3,828
    Quote Originally Posted by Statkowski View Post
    Hell has indeed froze over. A Chicago cop was actually held accountable for his actions. Amazing, simply amazing.
    I am waiting to hear IF those assessed the damages ACTUALLY PAY the damages!

  8. #8
    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Grennsboro NC
    Posts
    5,358
    The officer who shot the dog has to pay $2000?

    He can make that up with one trip to the drug evidence locker....
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Fairborn, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    13,063
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeSparky View Post
    I am waiting to hear IF those assessed the damages ACTUALLY PAY the damages!
    Many public employees are covered against large civil settlements incurred during the course of public employment. I don't know if such is the case for these officers, but it is entirely possible that they will pay the damages, but not be out-of-pocket a single dime. If they have such coverage, at least one of the following consequences should be assessed: the officers lose coverage, the premiums for coverage are no longer paid by the city or union, the city or union reduces the share of premiums that it pays, or the insurance company raises premiums, with the officers paying the difference.

  10. #10
    Regular Member Gunslinger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Free, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    3,855
    They should have thrown the pos thugs in jail, as well. At least the dollar amount will catch the eye of other rogue SS vermin.
    "For any man who sheds his blood with me this day shall be my brother...And gentlemen now abed shall think themselves accursed, they were not here, and hold their manhoods cheap whilst any speaks who fought with us on Crispin's day." Henry V

  11. #11
    Regular Member Deanimator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Rocky River, OH, U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,086
    Quote Originally Posted by eye95 View Post
    Many public employees are covered against large civil settlements incurred during the course of public employment. I don't know if such is the case for these officers, but it is entirely possible that they will pay the damages, but not be out-of-pocket a single dime. If they have such coverage, at least one of the following consequences should be assessed: the officers lose coverage, the premiums for coverage are no longer paid by the city or union, the city or union reduces the share of premiums that it pays, or the insurance company raises premiums, with the officers paying the difference.
    It depends upon whether the damages are punitive in nature or not.

    Chicago cops are NOT indemnified from punitive damages.

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    391
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim675 View Post
    A federal jury says Chicago law enforcement must pay $330,000 to a family after officers shot their dog during a home raid that turned up no illegal activity.
    Sadly, Chicago law enforcement isn't paying that. Chicago's taxpayers are paying.

  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    519
    I wonder how long the appeals process will drag on before the family actually sees some money.

  14. #14
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Fairborn, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    13,063
    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
    It depends upon whether the damages are punitive in nature or not.

    Chicago cops are NOT indemnified from punitive damages.
    Cite? Do you know what insurance the do or do not have?

    Admittedly, I don't know. However, the strong possibility exists that these cops will not have to pay a single dime out of their own pockets. Between the union, the PBA, and possibly even the city, they likely have some protection.

  15. #15
    Regular Member Deanimator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Rocky River, OH, U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,086
    Quote Originally Posted by eye95 View Post
    Cite? Do you know what insurance the do or do not have?

    Admittedly, I don't know. However, the strong possibility exists that these cops will not have to pay a single dime out of their own pockets. Between the union, the PBA, and possibly even the city, they likely have some protection.
    The SecondCityCop Blog has stated that they are not indemnified for punitive damages. This has been cited as one reason why the city has frequently settled in the past, to avoid trials in which individual Chicago cops could be found liable for substantial punitive damages.

  16. #16
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Fairborn, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    13,063
    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
    The SecondCityCop Blog has stated that they are not indemnified for punitive damages. This has been cited as one reason why the city has frequently settled in the past, to avoid trials in which individual Chicago cops could be found liable for substantial punitive damages.
    "Not indemnified for punitive damages" may merely mean that the city will not pay for them, not necessarily that they will have to pay out of their own pockets.

  17. #17
    Campaign Veteran since9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    6,787
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim675 View Post
    This is wonderful news.
    Yes it is! However, your title should have read: Chicago police must pay 330k for dog-shooting home raid. As it is, it leaves the central point blank.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

  18. #18
    Regular Member Deanimator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Rocky River, OH, U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,086
    Quote Originally Posted by eye95 View Post
    "Not indemnified for punitive damages" may merely mean that the city will not pay for them, not necessarily that they will have to pay out of their own pockets.
    Where else would the money come from?

    The plain meaning of what I read was that the individual cop was on the hook for the punitive damages.

    This came into play when Officer (later promoted to Detective) Alvin Weems was found civilly liable (along with the city) for $4.3 million for the unjustified shooting of an unarmed, unresisting, not under arrest man, Michael Pleasance. Weems recently committed suicide.
    Last edited by Deanimator; 08-27-2011 at 04:49 PM.

  19. #19
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Fairborn, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    13,063
    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
    Where else would the money come from?

    The plain meaning of what I read was that the individual cop was on the hook for the punitive damages.

    This came into play when Officer (later promoted to Detective) Alvin Weems was found civilly liable (along with the city) for $4.3 million for the unjustified shooting of an unarmed, unresisting, not under arrest man, Michael Pleasance. Weems recently committed suicide.
    Public employees are often protected by an insurance policy either provided by the government entity for which they work, their union, or themselves. When I was a public school teacher, such insurance was provided to me at no cost. It protected me from civil judgments. I suspect that the officers had such insurance, which will likely pay the judgment against them.

  20. #20
    Founder's Club Member Jim675's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bellevue, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1,037
    I am content with the market selling insurance to officers for this type of situation. Those officers who make either consistently or dramatically poor decisions will see their rates climb just as poor drivers do.
    They'll pay eventually or they'll give up that type of career. Gotta love the market working.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •