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Thread: Home defense scenarios

  1. #1
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    Home defense scenarios

    Part of the reason I quit lurking and joined this site is because I have a question (well, lots of them actually, but we'll start slow) about home defense.
    My husband and I both carry every day, especially around the house. A few months back, while I was still pregnant, our door bell rang at 9 pm. We weren't expecting anyone, so we both went on the alert. He put one hand on the door knob, drew his gun and put it behind his back; I stood behind and a little to the side of him, my hand on my gun. Turned out just to be a neighbor, but this experience, coupled with recently watching the Crimestrike videos, has made me realize we need to have a home defense plan.

    I'm not asking for anyone's secrets here, just some advice, tips, opinions or suggestions. I want to be prepared, and being a gun owner is only half of that goal.

    Scenario 1: It's daytime, my husband is asleep upstairs (or gone) and I am downstairs with our 4 month old son. An intruder starts forcing his way into my home.

    Scenario 2: We are both home, and on the same level of the house. An intruder breaks in.

    Scenario 3: It's nighttime, my husband is gone, and I hear an intruder break in.

    Scenario 4: I come home with my son, and enter upon an intruder in the act.

    I guess what I want to know, is, what would you do in these situations? Do I provide back up to my husband? Should I go to/remain a bedroom with our son, gun at the ready and on the phone with 911? When I'm by myself, what do I do with my child? (This is primarily what I struggle with, as I will want two hands on the gun and him out of harms way, but it is difficult to imagine just putting him on the floor and not knowing if he is okay, or not being able to reach him if something happens to me.) Do I retreat (even though SC Castle doctrine says I have no duty to retreat) or stand my ground in my own home?

    I pray that I will never face any of these scenarios, but since I have a family to protect, I want to be ready, just in case.

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    Good Morning, PPM! You are right to be concerned, especially with a child. I do not have any specific advice, but I will add my .02 worth.

    A lot depends on the layout of your home. The reading I have done on home defense suggests having a "safe room" that everyone can get to quickly. You might want to consider creating one on each floor of your home. The door should have sturdy locks, have furniture or some type of protection you can use for cover, etc. Of course your child is your first concern, always. I will let those with children advise you on that.

    I live alone so I understand your concern about being home alone with your child. I can only tell you what I do. First of all, I keep my doors locked all the time, unless I am outside working in the yard. I have a 55lb chocolate lab who will warn me if anyone is outside the house, day or night. I also have security lights, front and back. Motion detection lights would be better. You want to make your home as unattractive to a burgler as possible. I sleep with my .45 on the nightstand next to my bed. I am not paranoid, but I take reasonable precautions. If I ever come home and it's obvious that someone is inside or has been inside, I would leave and call the police. They are trained to clear a house or building and I am not. It's not worth my life to confront someone in my home.

    Hope that helps a little. Good to see that you are concerned about these things and want to do some planning ahead. Oh, and welcome to the forum!
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  3. #3
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    Advice on safeguarding yourself in your home...

    First, Welcome to OCDO!

    These are the everyday upgrades one should consider.

    To answer your question... reasonable approaches, such as, home alarms, extra lighting around the home (movement actived sensors), signage and re-inforcing your doors and windows with locks. Others are getting a dog (now this is just more than a security feature... it's a part of your family... so if you are not going to take care of the dog... then don't get one... consider an audio recording that plays/reacts to noise or motion).


    Have a plan - like a fire plan and for the ones you are thinking about. So it's good you are thinking about them now.

    As for the safe room... it can be any room in your home as long it is someplace you can get to easily, secure yourself in. I would recommend you have a phone. Now days many people do not have a home phone line (it's all cell). Now many people have used cell phones. Keep an old cell phone on a charger in your safe room and your car. Any cell phone will connect with 911 - so long as you are within cell coverage.

    So this comes up... to clear your home or not... I would strongly recommend folks do not clear during an active home invasion or break in. To properly clear a home it takes a trained team. Doing it as an individual or untrained is an unnecessary risk. Call 911 and let the experts and your taxes work for you.

    Obviously, you have a firearm. You'll need a good light.

    As for backing up your spouse... unless you have trained together... I would recommend you assign task (get yourself up to a safe room, call 911, etc) rather than use each other as backup. The last thing I would hate for you two would be... as you are "backing up" your spouse. He tackles the intruder (which I again don't recommend either) and as you provide backup... your gun discharges and hits your spouse...

    What I do recommend is that you both get yourself to safety. Secure it and call 911...

    Now if you are separated please make sure that you clearly identify yourself when things are over. I would hate for the stress of the moment... your spouse surprising you and you reacting by discharging your firearm into him.

    Be safe, have a reasonable plan, check out your layout and have access to your firearm, phone and light.


    Point of clarification: Playing Scenario's is a fluid mind game. Change one detail it can change your reaction and/or your ability to react. So start simple and then go from there.
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  4. #4
    Regular Member Redbaron007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldkim View Post
    First, Welcome to OCDO!

    These are the everyday upgrades one should consider.

    To answer your question... reasonable approaches, such as, home alarms, extra lighting around the home (movement actived sensors), signage and re-inforcing your doors and windows with locks. Others are getting a dog (now this is just more than a security feature... it's a part of your family... so if you are not going to take care of the dog... then don't get one... consider an audio recording that plays/reacts to noise or motion).


    Have a plan - like a fire plan and for the ones you are thinking about. So it's good you are thinking about them now.

    As for the safe room... it can be any room in your home as long it is someplace you can get to easily, secure yourself in. I would recommend you have a phone. Now days many people do not have a home phone line (it's all cell). Now many people have used cell phones. Keep an old cell phone on a charger in your safe room and your car. Any cell phone will connect with 911 - so long as you are within cell coverage.

    So this comes up... to clear your home or not... I would strongly recommend folks do not clear during an active home invasion or break in. To properly clear a home it takes a trained team. Doing it as an individual or untrained is an unnecessary risk. Call 911 and let the experts and your taxes work for you.

    Obviously, you have a firearm. You'll need a good light.

    As for backing up your spouse... unless you have trained together... I would recommend you assign task (get yourself up to a safe room, call 911, etc) rather than use each other as backup. The last thing I would hate for you two would be... as you are "backing up" your spouse. He tackles the intruder (which I again don't recommend either) and as you provide backup... your gun discharges and hits your spouse...

    What I do recommend is that you both get yourself to safety. Secure it and call 911...

    Now if you are separated please make sure that you clearly identify yourself when things are over. I would hate for the stress of the moment... your spouse surprising you and you reacting by discharging your firearm into him.

    Be safe, have a reasonable plan, check out your layout and have access to your firearm, phone and light.


    Point of clarification: Playing Scenario's is a fluid mind game. Change one detail it can change your reaction and/or your ability to react. So start simple and then go from there.
    Very good post!!

    The bold blue print is very important. All scenarios will be different. The key is to have a basic process in place. When you are under the stress of any of the situations listed above; you want a very simple, easy, basic plan...something that is more of a reflex, instead of having to try and think about all the steps involved.

    As others have stated, a safe room on each floor is a start with a connection to 911. Some will keep personal protection in the safe room to so they don't have to search for their weapon; but either/both are ok...again depending on the process you have in place.

    If you don't have a closet or bathroom readily available for the safe room; use your bedroom, but have a good lock and furniture you can use to provide a barrier between you and the BG....this way you have the opportunity fire with protection.

    Good luck.....Be safe!

    Congrats on the boy, too!!






    (BTW...where are the pics from the other thread? )

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruby View Post
    Good Morning, PPM! You are right to be concerned, especially with a child. I do not have any specific advice, but I will add my .02 worth.

    A lot depends on the layout of your home. The reading I have done on home defense suggests having a "safe room" that everyone can get to quickly. You might want to consider creating one on each floor of your home. The door should have sturdy locks, have furniture or some type of protection you can use for cover, etc. Of course your child is your first concern, always. I will let those with children advise you on that.

    I live alone so I understand your concern about being home alone with your child. I can only tell you what I do. First of all, I keep my doors locked all the time, unless I am outside working in the yard. I have a 55lb chocolate lab who will warn me if anyone is outside the house, day or night. I also have security lights, front and back. Motion detection lights would be better. You want to make your home as unattractive to a burgler as possible. I sleep with my .45 on the nightstand next to my bed. I am not paranoid, but I take reasonable precautions. If I ever come home and it's obvious that someone is inside or has been inside, I would leave and call the police. They are trained to clear a house or building and I am not. It's not worth my life to confront someone in my home.

    Hope that helps a little. Good to see that you are concerned about these things and want to do some planning ahead. Oh, and welcome to the forum!
    Thanks for your response Ruby! We do leave our doors locked all the time, and have our guns in our nightstands when we sleep. Since my husband is allergic to dogs, we can't really go that route, but the motion detectors and security lights are a good idea.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldkim View Post
    First, Welcome to OCDO!

    These are the everyday upgrades one should consider.

    To answer your question... reasonable approaches, such as, home alarms, extra lighting around the home (movement actived sensors), signage and re-inforcing your doors and windows with locks. Others are getting a dog (now this is just more than a security feature... it's a part of your family... so if you are not going to take care of the dog... then don't get one... consider an audio recording that plays/reacts to noise or motion).


    Have a plan - like a fire plan and for the ones you are thinking about. So it's good you are thinking about them now.

    As for the safe room... it can be any room in your home as long it is someplace you can get to easily, secure yourself in. I would recommend you have a phone. Now days many people do not have a home phone line (it's all cell). Now many people have used cell phones. Keep an old cell phone on a charger in your safe room and your car. Any cell phone will connect with 911 - so long as you are within cell coverage.

    So this comes up... to clear your home or not... I would strongly recommend folks do not clear during an active home invasion or break in. To properly clear a home it takes a trained team. Doing it as an individual or untrained is an unnecessary risk. Call 911 and let the experts and your taxes work for you.

    Obviously, you have a firearm. You'll need a good light.

    As for backing up your spouse... unless you have trained together... I would recommend you assign task (get yourself up to a safe room, call 911, etc) rather than use each other as backup. The last thing I would hate for you two would be... as you are "backing up" your spouse. He tackles the intruder (which I again don't recommend either) and as you provide backup... your gun discharges and hits your spouse...

    What I do recommend is that you both get yourself to safety. Secure it and call 911...

    Now if you are separated please make sure that you clearly identify yourself when things are over. I would hate for the stress of the moment... your spouse surprising you and you reacting by discharging your firearm into him.

    Be safe, have a reasonable plan, check out your layout and have access to your firearm, phone and light.


    Point of clarification: Playing Scenario's is a fluid mind game. Change one detail it can change your reaction and/or your ability to react. So start simple and then go from there.
    Thanks for your insights! Some of the things you mentioned are exactly what I want to avoid; such as accidently shooting each other. I've never been in an adrenaline pumping situation, but I imagine it's mostly reactionary, rather than following through a step by step plan. Mostly I just want to set up a basic plan so he and I know who will take point and what the other will/should do.
    Adding a light to my EDC is an excellent idea; thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbaron007 View Post
    Very good post!!

    The bold blue print is very important. All scenarios will be different. The key is to have a basic process in place. When you are under the stress of any of the situations listed above; you want a very simple, easy, basic plan...something that is more of a reflex, instead of having to try and think about all the steps involved.
    Exactly my thoughts! Reflex, within guidelines, so we know what to expect from each other, as much as possible.

    As others have stated, a safe room on each floor is a start with a connection to 911. Some will keep personal protection in the safe room to so they don't have to search for their weapon; but either/both are ok...again depending on the process you have in place.

    If you don't have a closet or bathroom readily available for the safe room; use your bedroom, but have a good lock and furniture you can use to provide a barrier between you and the BG....this way you have the opportunity fire with protection.

    Good luck.....Be safe!

    Congrats on the boy, too!!
    Thanks!!!






    (BTW...where are the pics from the other thread? )
    LOL, locked in a secure location




    **I just now noticed the multi quote button. Dangit!
    Last edited by PistolPackingMomma; 10-03-2011 at 06:10 PM.

  8. #8
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    well,,,

    based on the OP, I would say you should have a peep hole in the door!
    An idea i like better, is a small mirror mounted by a window, AWAY from the door, aimed for a view of anybody thats wanting to get in!

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    I'm very familiar with the cornered cat. Great reading!

    Lol, a peephole would be great. I bet I could use my glock to make one We do have a 2' cardboard glock display hanging in the window by our door. Makes it very interesting for solicitors, haha!

  10. #10
    Regular Member Badger Johnson's Avatar
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    This scenario happened to us recently.

    Nothing happened, it was just a noise, but here's what I encountered in terms of strategy and tactics.

    1. I was not staying at home we were on vacation in a cabin in a state campground, so it was incrementally hard to 'call 911' - it was dark, middle of the night, no way to easily call. I suppose somewhere in the brochure it had a camp police number to call - it's stupid to go looking for this if you think someone is gonna bust into the bedroom any minute;

    2. We were in the bedroom, awake, both had our firearms by the side of the bed, in holsters, loaded, one in the chamber, BUGs, no safeties;

    3. It would have been ideal and de-escalated immediately if we'd been able to see the rooms, see the source of the noise. A simple remote cam with a laptop hookup would have been invaluable, in retrospect but we never expected...uh, the 'unexpected' noise. ;

    4. We TOTALLY blew the perimeter security, because we went into the cabin, everything looked OK, but as it turns out every window was unlocked (the twist latch was non-standard, but we never checked them). Being 'security conscious' it's a serious omission. In the 'old days' we'd camp outside in a tent, so just being in a cinderblock building seemed so secure we took it for granted. So my advice is to go over the doors and windows and bring duct tape and try to fix/reinforce/lock existing latches and openings. We fixed the screen door which looked like the previous camper have slashed it open to get the door key. It only takes seconds to do an inside and outside walk around. Yes it's more secure than a tent but also more territory to cover/control, and harder to see or hear anything outside;

    5. We both tried to check the source of the noise. This is/was a mistake. (*);

    6. In the future, we'll have one person stay in the bedroom, firearm at low ready, and the defender's role would be to cover the partner during a retreat back into the room if an uninvited guest is present in the other room;

    (*) if unarmed, it kinda makes sense to have two people stick together - force of numbers, two people with baseball bats (lol) can be formidable. But with a force multiplier like a firearm, it's better that one, the more agile or awake one go investigate, with the plan not to engage, but retreat to the bedroom, and defend in place if it seems feasible. Obviously, there are times when you want to lead the attackers or interlopers -away- from the home fort, the wimmens and chillen staying hidden and safe. Use your own judgment but I like the concept of explore, gather info and retreat back into the bedroom and re-join your partner who is covering you. Be aware you will be crossing their fireline when you transition back 'home' after assessing the threat.

    Unless you train extensively, room-to-room, BELIEVE ME, you are going to get in each others way. You have to form your own strategy and practice, but when you're startled and you have no plan you often just are driven by bravado (We has a gun).

    IMO, because of this a basic plan (defend/explore/retreat/call for help) is WAY above just reacting unless you're a professional fighter. I'm definitely open to any logical and helpful critique from experienced posters.

    Though startled we remained calm and never had any tunnel vision or any effects and went to sleep after figuring out the noise was a door slamming. (Wind or some ground tremors).

    Just some ideas. HTH]

    Additional gear? Maybe a cheap walkie-talkie to share - in a pinch use your cellphones. Small vid-cam, PC/laptop hook up to surveil the outside/living room, etc. Add-on door locks - these flip into doors, or use bars or something to help lock doors. Many campsite cabins get pretty abused wrt doors and windows. Extra lights, maybe some OC spray back up (good for bears also).
    Last edited by Badger Johnson; 10-03-2011 at 10:39 PM.
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  11. #11
    Regular Member 1245A Defender's Avatar
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    What???

    Quote Originally Posted by Badger Johnson View Post
    This scenario happened to us recently.

    Nothing happened, it was just a noise, but here's what I encountered in terms of strategy and tactics.

    1. I was not staying at home we were on vacation in a cabin in a state campground, so it was incrementally hard to 'call 911' - it was dark, middle of the night, no way to easily call. I suppose somewhere in the brochure it had a camp police number to call - it's stupid to go looking for this if you think someone is gonna bust into the bedroom any minute;

    2. We were in the bedroom, awake, both had our firearms by the side of the bed, in holsters, loaded, one in the chamber, BUGs, no safeties;

    3. It would have been ideal and de-escalated immediately if we'd been able to see the rooms, see the source of the noise. A simple remote cam with a laptop hookup would have been invaluable, in retrospect but we never expected...uh, the 'unexpected' noise. ;

    4. We TOTALLY blew the perimeter security, because we went into the cabin, everything looked OK, but as it turns out every window was unlocked (the twist latch was non-standard, but we never checked them). Being 'security conscious' it's a serious omission. In the 'old days' we'd camp outside in a tent, so just being in a cinderblock building seemed so secure we took it for granted. So my advice is to go over the doors and windows and bring duct tape and try to fix/reinforce/lock existing latches and openings. We fixed the screen door which looked like the previous camper have slashed it open to get the door key. It only takes seconds to do an inside and outside walk around. Yes it's more secure than a tent but also more territory to cover/control, and harder to see or hear anything outside;

    5. We both tried to check the source of the noise. This is/was a mistake. (*);

    6. In the future, we'll have one person stay in the bedroom, firearm at low ready, and the defender's role would be to cover the partner during a retreat back into the room if an uninvited guest is present in the other room;


    why would you Retreat? I would SHOOT!!!



    (*) if unarmed, it kinda makes sense to have two people stick together - force of numbers, two people with baseball bats (lol) can be formidable. But with a force multiplier like a firearm, it's better that one, the more agile or awake one go investigate, with the plan not to engage, but retreat to the bedroom, and defend in place if it seems feasible. Obviously, there are times when you want to lead the attackers or interlopers -away- from the home fort,


    Why not Engage? I would SHOOT!!!
    What will you do? Play a pan flute
    and dance away? Away from the wife and kids your supposed to protect?


    the wimmens and chillen staying hidden and safe. Use your own judgment but I like the concept of explore, gather info and retreat back into the bedroom and re-join your partner

    WHY? I WOULD SHOOT!!!
    Why would you want to explore and get info? You gonna write the report for the police?


    who is covering you. Be aware you will be crossing their fireline when you transition back 'home' after assessing the threat.

    Unless you train extensively, room-to-room, BELIEVE ME, you are going to get in each others way. You have to form your own strategy and practice, but when you're startled and you have no plan you often just are driven by bravado (We has a gun).

    IMO, because of this a basic plan (defend/explore/retreat/call for help) is WAY above just reacting unless you're a professional fighter. I'm definitely open to any logical and helpful critique from experienced posters.

    Though startled we remained calm and never had any tunnel vision or any effects and went to sleep after figuring out the noise was a door slamming. (Wind or some ground tremors).

    Just some ideas. HTH]

    Additional gear? Maybe a cheap walkie-talkie to share - in a pinch use your cellphones. Small vid-cam, PC/laptop hook up to surveil the outside/living room, etc. Add-on door locks - these flip into doors, or use bars or something to help lock doors. Many campsite cabins get pretty abused wrt doors and windows. Extra lights, maybe some OC spray back up (good for bears also).
    see my big fonts answers to your bigger font quotes.
    EMNofSeattle wrote: Your idea of freedom terrifies me. So you are actually right. I am perfectly happy with what you call tyranny.....

    “If ever a time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.”

    Stand up for your Rights,, They have no authority on their own...

    All power is inherent in the people,
    it is their right and duty to be at all times ARMED!

  12. #12
    Regular Member Badger Johnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1245A Defender View Post
    see my big fonts answers to your bigger font quotes.
    I get it - you're bloodthirsty, you're a hot-headed young man and you have no respect for consequences.

    Let me break it down:
    1. I was not at HOME, I was in a hotel room/camping cabin;
    2. It was dark and I'm not sure I had my glasses and the place was unfamiliar;
    3. If i saw one person in the living room, I would not know if it was a bad guy, a camper who had the date wrong, or one of a group of people, an advance guard, or a campground employee. I intended to take a peek and 99.9% sure it was nothing, duck back into the foxhole and re-assess. In fact my partner is more agile but a bit less aggressive, so I wouldn't want her going toe-to-toe alone with three badguys; I would not know if the person was ARMED.
    4. It might have been an animal - a bear, for example, who would be deterred by a door and a dresser in front of it, but not to a 9mm handgun.

    Perhaps next time you could post your replies in 128 point font it might have a bigger impact, but being that you seem impulsive, and that's your main strategy, along with some blood lust and maybe watching too much TV is over daring and would probably land you in jail 4 out of 5 times due to misidentification, I doubt it will be something I want to adopt. Thanks for your input though. I would suggest you avoid shooting an UNARMED PERSON who has not put you in fear of bodily harm. Just being in the ante-way of a camping cabin is not sufficient reason to kill someone.

    HTH
    A gun in a holster is better than one drawn and dispensing bullets. Concealed forces the latter. - ixtow

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  13. #13
    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Scenario 1: It's daytime, my husband is asleep upstairs (or gone) and I am downstairs with our 4 month old son. An intruder starts forcing his way into my home.
    What's you prepared plan with hubby if he's home and not at the center of action? You do have a plan, don't you? For when hubby is not home: What's your plan? Retreat to a safe room? Exit from the other end of the structure? Shoot them as they pass the plane of the doorframe because you have nowhere else to go? Just really not enough detail to even begin to suggest a response except "They Shall Not Pass" if there is no way to get away.

    Scenario 2: We are both home, and on the same level of the house. An intruder breaks in.
    What's your prepared plan? Not enough detail here either. Need to know loads more about the layout of the dwelling, how you are dispersed/bunched up, what your exit routes may or may not be, and how you are armed. And where are the kids in relation to you and in relation to the intruder?

    Scenario 3: It's nighttime, my husband is gone, and I hear an intruder break in. Where are the kids in relation to you? Where is the intruder in relation to you and the kids? What is your plan for this? Is there a fatal funnel you can employ? Could you exit safely or do you do better forting up? If forting up do you bring the kids to you or you go to them?

    See, most of it boils down to running these scenarios in your head and then walking through various solution options and seeing how they work and where they could be improved. Then you run them again looking for holes and empty spaces. Can you get friends to role play with you (while everybody uses finger guns because the real ones are locked away for this sort of training - not even airsoft! And I cannot close without reminding you that retreat/escape may be your best move - if you know how to do it. (Just saying you can drop out the kid's bedroom window onto the shed roof and then onto the driveway is not the same as trying to pull that off with a toddler in one arm and a gun, flashlight and cell phone in the other - even when the toddler is cooperative, let alone at zero-dark-thirty.)

    Thank you for playing. We have lovely parting gifts for you to take jome.

    stay safe.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Part of the reason I quit lurking and joined this site is because I have a question (well, lots of them actually, but we'll start slow) about home defense.
    It's always good to have questions! Show's you're thinking about things, instead of just assuming, "I'll be ok with my gun."

    My husband and I both carry every day, especially around the house. A few months back, while I was still pregnant, our door bell rang at 9 pm. We weren't expecting anyone, so we both went on the alert. He put one hand on the door knob, drew his gun and put it behind his back; I stood behind and a little to the side of him, my hand on my gun. Turned out just to be a neighbor, but this experience, coupled with recently watching the Crimestrike videos, has made me realize we need to have a home defense plan.
    Did he use the peephole before unlocking the door?

    I'm not asking for anyone's secrets here, just some advice, tips, opinions or suggestions. I want to be prepared, and being a gun owner is only half of that goal.
    You're right. I liken it to overtime, after the last inning or quarter of the game. If all else fails, I want to pull every trick in the book to ensure I win, and for that, preparation is the key:

    1. Install peepholes on all doors. If you don't know AND trust the person, don't open the door. If it's a couple of shady characters, I wouldn't even acknowledge you're at home.

    2. Install entry barriers on all doors and windows.
    a. For doors, that means a long-throw keyed deadbolt, along with a separate, inside-only deadbolt. This deters entry even if they manage to pick the lock. All striker plates and hinges should be heavy duty, and secured into both the door and the frame with extra-long screws. If possible, get a steel door. The door to my apartment is steel, and even with a K-12 saw, it would take them a full minute to get inside. Use an additional device, such as a door jamb, which requires serious destruction to get past. Most home invasions begin with someone kicking down a chincy door. If you door is rock-solid, they'll likely skip it by the third kick.
    b. For windows, if the problems in your neighborhood are really bad, install interior bars. If not, at least install track restriction dowels. Simply cutting off a broomstick handle works wonders. It forces them to break the glass, even if they can jimmy the lock.

    The goals are to 1) Alert you upon any entry; 2) Prolong their entry time.

    3. Determine your safe areas and exit route(s). A safe area is one that's as heavily fortified as the exterior (locks, striker plates, hinges, etc.) and that possesses one or two exit routes not likely to be used as an entrance. If they're barred, they should be easily defeated from the inside within a second or two. The goal is to find some place into which you can safely retreat and from which you can rapidly escape while leaving the intruders and your valuables (at least the chincy ones) on the other side. As a minimum, you'll want outside communication (hard line and cell phone), ability to trip your alarm system, ventilation, water, snack. If it's as sturdy as a bank vault, you won't need an exit route. If not, the idea is if they want to pursue you, it should take them longer than it takes you to flee to safety. Your exit routes beyond your exit point should not come within sight of any likely intrusion point. Having two exit routes helps to prepare for a front or rear intrusion while escaping out the other side.

    4. Establish your weapons caches. Simply hiding them under the couch cushions isn't a very good idea if that's the first place the criminals (or children) look. On the other hand, you don't want them 10 seconds away in a safe if the criminals can kick down your door in 2 seconds. Carrying them on your person around the home keeps them in your hands and out of the hands of others. You wouldn't want to cache a weapon near the front door. If there's a showdown, you should move rearward, behind a place of cover, but in sight of the front door. That's where one firearm might be, and where you should have a spare magazine for your carry piece. Obviously, you should keep a spare firearm and ammunition in your safe area, in very quick access, but not in plane sight.

    5. Establish deterrents. Signs like "protected by Smith and Wesson" or 'protected by dog" seem like simple bravado, as they usually are, and advertise that you have firearms or something else you feel you need to protect. They say, "Steal Me." Cutting back the bushes around ground windows, and installing dual-intensity sensor lights near likely entry points such as front and rear doors not only tend to scare away criminals (they hate the light), it'll also tell them you're prepared. They're not going to hit Ft. Knox when they can knock off a shack.

    6. Establish sensors and alarms. A visible sensor says "you're being watched." A security camera tells an intruder who's entered your home that he's just been had. Cameras, working or not, scare the crap of them, as that's one sure-fire means by which they'll find their can in the can. A siren says, "the cops are on their way," as most people have monitored service. Whether you have monitored service or not matters little, as you're alerted, your neighbors are alerted, the bad guys know it, and think the cops are probably alerted, too. Numerous inexpensive contact and proximity alarms are readily available. Somewhat better systems link sensors to a central control unit via IR or more commonly RF. You don't need a multi-thousand dollar system to protect your house. You can get 90% of the way there by a well-placed set of sensor-alarms costing less than $100.

    Scenario 1: It's daytime, my husband is asleep upstairs (or gone) and I am downstairs with our 4 month old son. An intruder starts forcing his way into my home.

    Scenario 2: We are both home, and on the same level of the house. An intruder breaks in.

    Scenario 3: It's nighttime, my husband is gone, and I hear an intruder break in.

    Scenario 4: I come home with my son, and enter upon an intruder in the act.
    If you live in a state with a castle law, and it's legal for you to fire when he breaks the threshold, then do so.

    I guess what I want to know, is, what would you do in these situations? Do I provide back up to my husband? Should I go to/remain a bedroom with our son, gun at the ready and on the phone with 911? When I'm by myself, what do I do with my child? (This is primarily what I struggle with, as I will want two hands on the gun and him out of harms way, but it is difficult to imagine just putting him on the floor and not knowing if he is okay, or not being able to reach him if something happens to me.) Do I retreat (even though SC Castle doctrine says I have no duty to retreat) or stand my ground in my own home?
    Let's face it - you're a woman. That doesn't mean you can't take care of yourself. It means when a criminal takes a look at you, unless they see your firearm, they're going to believe they can get the better of you on sheer strength alone. In nearly all homes, that's within 1 second of where you stand, so you're likely to be one second or less away from death.

    I would therefore approach things this way:

    1. Always lock your doors and windows, and keep them locked. Follow the preparation guidelines given above. That way, if an intruder is in your home, you can be certain they didn't inadvertently walk in the wrong door.

    2. If sounds, events, or anything indicate you're being or about to be invaded, call 911 and put it on speakerphone. It's a legal record and police are on their way in the off chance that the intruders get the better of you but don't kill you. Do NOT allow the 911 operator, who does not know your situation, your setup, or what's going on to slow you down in any way. Just say "Armed Intruders are

    3. Before pulling the trigger, you might want to take half a second to ensure you don't recognize the individual. It was be a shame to kill a trusted neighbor to whom you'd given a key. Similarly, tell them to "always knock twice, even if they "know" you're not at home."

    4. As for two-person defense, that can get very dangerous and hairy real quick. The best remedy for that is to take an advanced handgun class together which specifically address that issue, along with an FTX (field training exercise).

    If you would prefer to escape instead of taking them on:

    5. Use your safe area and exit plan.

    I pray that I will never face any of these scenarios, but since I have a family to protect, I want to be ready, just in case.
    You can never be too ready. The key is to be flexible. If I had a clear, unambiguous shot, I'd take it, for a couple of reason. First, I wouldn't know how many I'm dealing with, and I'd rather deal with one less. Second, a shot is as good as an alarm, and may very well scare any others off. Do remain behind cover, though! The perp's partner(s) may come flying around the corner. Cover should conceal you from him both visually as well as physically while providing you with a good opportunity to take a second shot.

    Now - what to do with the baby! I'd keep him close. You don't ever want to put him down then have to leave him behind.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

  15. #15
    Regular Member okboomer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Scenario 1: It's daytime, my husband is asleep upstairs (or gone) and I am downstairs with our 4 month old son. An intruder starts forcing his way into my home.
    1.A. Husband home asleep: Pick up the baby and retreat to where the husband is and pass infant to hubby while he is waking up with you on guard at the door would be my first rendition of the SCENARIO. Reason: ultimately, protection of the infant/child is the first priority. Caveat: only do this if you have a clear line of retreat and concealment from intruder.

    1.A.a. If there is no line of retreat, secure infant and go to concealment with a wall at your back and prepare to defend yourself and the baby. If the intruder misses you and proceeds upstairs, yell to wake hubby, dial his cell phone, whatever you have to do to rouse him and warn him of the intruder.

    1.B. Husband not home: go to 1.A.a. scenario.

    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Scenario 2: We are both home, and on the same level of the house. An intruder breaks in.
    One nearest the infant secures the infant, other goes to LowReady. The one with the infant locates to back of weak hand side and places hand on shoulder, then both retreat to concealment position with back to wall. Prepare to defend selves.

    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Scenario 3: It's nighttime, my husband is gone, and I hear an intruder break in.
    This assumes you are upstairs and not dozing on the couch: move to doorway of infant's room and prepare to defend yourselves.

    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Scenario 4: I come home with my son, and enter upon an intruder in the act.
    If possible, retreat out the door you just entered through and flee to neighbor's house or back into vehicle.

    Now, a few items you need to consider. When you fire a pistol, you are going to harm the infant's hearing if you don't muffle the sound by covering the infant's ear with a hand and pressing the other ear into your body. Which side do you carry the infant on? How do you carry the infant? Have you seen limalife youtube videos? She deals with a few of these issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    I guess what I want to know, is, what would you do in these situations? Do I provide back up to my husband? Should I go to/remain a bedroom with our son, gun at the ready and on the phone with 911? When I'm by myself, what do I do with my child? (This is primarily what I struggle with, as I will want two hands on the gun and him out of harms way, but it is difficult to imagine just putting him on the floor and not knowing if he is okay, or not being able to reach him if something happens to me.) Do I retreat (even though SC Castle doctrine says I have no duty to retreat) or stand my ground in my own home?

    I pray that I will never face any of these scenarios, but since I have a family to protect, I want to be ready, just in case.
    The next thing I would suggest is that you two find some tactical pistol classes and get more training! They are fun, affordable, and you meet the nicest folks there while developing essential skills!

    You have made a great start, and simply talking about things and actually practicing moving around will help you when the adrenalin is pumping. The ex and I have been together so long that we automatically assumed proper support stances during some of our tactical classes The instructor used it to make a point with the rest of the class or I wouldn't have even noticed
    It also helps that he's normally left handed (shoots righty, though) so I always have tried to be clear of his left side.

    Also, not many men realize that the female of the species is much more dangerous than the male, especially when it comes to protecting their children.

    Also, get some good mini flashlights with a button on the end ... try them out until you both find a model that is comfortable for you to hold with a closed fist. You will need them for a tactical pistol class anyway (and they will teach you the different holds/uses of the mini flashlight), but before you shoot anything, be absolutely sure of your target. The mini flash will allow you to flash the target for identification. You don't necessarily need the illumination to shoot, but you do need it for identification and if you get a flashlight with enough lumens, you can momentarily startle the BG, giving you that split second to identify friend or foe.

    And, always, always, always, keep your finger OFF THE TRIGGER until you have positively identified the intruder!

    If it is someone you don't recognize, two to the chest, one to the head. If your state has the full Castle Doctrine, you don't need to ascertain why a stranger is in your house.

    Again, training, practice, training, practice, training, practice.
    cheers - okboomer
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger Johnson View Post
    snip...

    (*) if unarmed, it kinda makes sense to have two people stick together - force of numbers, two people with baseball bats (lol) can be formidable. But with a force multiplier like a firearm, it's better that one, the more agile or awake one go investigate, with the plan not to engage, but retreat to the bedroom, and defend in place if it seems feasible. Obviously, there are times when you want to lead the attackers or interlopers -away- from the home fort, the wimmens and chillen staying hidden and safe. Use your own judgment but I like the concept of explore, gather info and retreat back into the bedroom and re-join your partner who is covering you. Be aware you will be crossing their fireline when you transition back 'home' after assessing the threat.

    Unless you train extensively, room-to-room, BELIEVE ME, you are going to get in each others way. You have to form your own strategy and practice, but when you're startled and you have no plan you often just are driven by bravado (We has a gun).

    IMO, because of this a basic plan (defend/explore/retreat/call for help) is WAY above just reacting unless you're a professional fighter. I'm definitely open to any logical and helpful critique from experienced posters.

    Though startled we remained calm and never had any tunnel vision or any effects and went to sleep after figuring out the noise was a door slamming. (Wind or some ground tremors).

    Just some ideas. HTH]

    Additional gear? Maybe a cheap walkie-talkie to share - in a pinch use your cellphones. Small vid-cam, PC/laptop hook up to surveil the outside/living room, etc. Add-on door locks - these flip into doors, or use bars or something to help lock doors. Many campsite cabins get pretty abused wrt doors and windows. Extra lights, maybe some OC spray back up (good for bears also).
    That does help; thanks! Glad your situation turned out be nothing!

    Quote Originally Posted by skidmark View Post
    snip...
    Scenario 1: It's daytime, my husband is asleep upstairs (or gone) and I am downstairs with our 4 month old son. An intruder starts forcing his way into my home.
    What's you prepared plan with hubby if he's home and not at the center of action? You do have a plan, don't you? For when hubby is not home: What's your plan? Retreat to a safe room? Exit from the other end of the structure? Shoot them as they pass the plane of the doorframe because you have nowhere else to go? Just really not enough detail to even begin to suggest a response except "They Shall Not Pass" if there is no way to get away.

    Scenario 2: We are both home, and on the same level of the house. An intruder breaks in.
    What's your prepared plan? Not enough detail here either. Need to know loads more about the layout of the dwelling, how you are dispersed/bunched up, what your exit routes may or may not be, and how you are armed. And where are the kids in relation to you and in relation to the intruder?

    stay safe.
    Thanks for your response Skidmark. Unfortunately, we don't have any plan at the moment, so I can't really provide more details for you in that regard. But I can answer some of your questions.
    Our house is laid out in a very open design, except that the stairs to the second level are located "behind" our front door. The only room we could retreat to is a small laundry room leading to the garage. This is probably going to be our 'safe room'. 99.9% of the time my son is with me or within a few feet of me. We do have a sliding glass door leading to the backyard through the kitchen, but it would not be the fastest escape. I carry my Glock 27 and a ka-bar with me everywhere every day.

    Quote Originally Posted by since9 View Post
    snip...
    It's always good to have questions! Show's you're thinking about things, instead of just assuming, "I'll be ok with my gun." Did he use the peephole before unlocking the door?

    ...1. Install peepholes on all doors. If you don't know AND trust the person, don't open the door. If it's a couple of shady characters, I wouldn't even acknowledge you're at home.

    ...If possible, get a steel door. The door to my apartment is steel, and even with a K-12 saw, it would take them a full minute to get inside. Use an additional device, such as a door jamb, which requires serious destruction to get past. Most home invasions begin with someone kicking down a chincy door. If you door is rock-solid, they'll likely skip it by the third kick.

    ...The goals are to 1) Alert you upon any entry; 2) Prolong their entry time.

    ...If you live in a state with a castle law, and it's legal for you to fire when he breaks the threshold, then do so.

    ...1. Always lock your doors and windows, and keep them locked. Follow the preparation guidelines given above. That way, if an intruder is in your home, you can be certain they didn't inadvertently walk in the wrong door.
    Great tips! We don't have a peephole in our door; in hindsight we should have turned on the porch light and looked out the window. We do that now. Our door is metal; I assume it's steel. You're right, we shouldn't answer the door when it's a stranger. This is a bad habit of mine; I'm waaay too nice. We do have Castle doctrine here, (yay!!!) and if I have to, I will utilize it. We always keep our doors and windows locked, even when we're home. Thanks for your ideas!

    Quote Originally Posted by okboomer View Post
    snip...
    ...Now, a few items you need to consider. When you fire a pistol, you are going to harm the infant's hearing if you don't muffle the sound by covering the infant's ear with a hand and pressing the other ear into your body. Which side do you carry the infant on? How do you carry the infant? Have you seen limalife youtube videos? She deals with a few of these issues.

    ...The next thing I would suggest is that you two find some tactical pistol classes and get more training! They are fun, affordable, and you meet the nicest folks there while developing essential skills!

    ...If it is someone you don't recognize, two to the chest, one to the head. If your state has the full Castle Doctrine, you don't need to ascertain why a stranger is in your house.

    Again, training, practice, training, practice, training, practice.
    Thanks okboomer! I've seen a couple of Limalife's videos, but I should check out more of her stuff! A big concern of mine was his hearing in the event of having to shoot.
    We really want tactical training; we'll have to look into that and see if there are any classes around here.

    Y'all have been offering some great insights; thanks so much!!!

  17. #17
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    From my own experience- Im going to suggest a couple of things both along the lines above- and a bit outside the box.

    1) Alarms -be it with a subscription-type service, or just local to notify you and folks nearby- There are a wide range of options out there to suit a lot of budgets. Also do not neglect exterior lighting, and If you can acquire them- cameras and a monitor. There are wireless cams out there now that you can connect to your computer/laptop etc. as well. One needs more than just hearing a dog bark or windows breaking to notify them of an intrusion- (what if you are in a room some distance from the break-in point, or have other things going on, that prevent you hearing it (or if an intruder with some actual skills conducts a stealthy entry).

    2) Dogs are great- and they are indeed more than just a security device to you. But 2 things come with that- 1 that you have to "know" your dog, and get a handle on determing if they are barking because they smell/hear an animal, or a neighbor's dog, or because of an actual danger. A lot of folks (myself included in the past) ended up brushing off some barking to thinking the dog is barking again at a raccoon.. only to find out otherwise...
    The other, of course,is the attachment you will have to that 4-legged family member. In some cases an intruder wont think twice about killing your dog on their way in-to eliminate that hazzard to them, if nothing else, as happened to me last year.

    3)Plans... there;s a double-edged sword to plans. You cant account for every concievable situation that can come up.
    Murphy isnt going to allow an intruder to appear when you and others in the home are in just the right places, at just the right times, to either sweep and clear, cover one another, or retreat to some "safe" room.
    When trouble comes knocking, it's going to be when your sitting on the toilet in the house alone, when you are deep asleep, or in the shower, etc. Come up with a reasonable set of responses, and train together (as a couple) in whatever ways you can. Work out some basics- especially means of communicating both verbally or with hand-signaling (ya, sounds corny- but sometimes you dont want the bad guy to hear you and the hubby working out a strategy from two different ends of the house..)
    Main thing is- keep plans, and options as flexible as possible. Adhering to some concrete plan or drill will only make things worse, when you find the situations you've planned for and trained for arent panning out that way.

    4) With that child around- scratch any plans of sweep and clear. Priority One is get that child to the safest,most defendable location you can, and go from there.

  18. #18
    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Thanks for your response Skidmark. Unfortunately, we don't have any plan at the moment, so I can't really provide more details for you in that regard. But I can answer some of your questions.
    PPM - The point was not to get you to answer questions but to understand that you need a plan - or two or three, depending on what you are planning for and what you plan to do about it. And to get you to start seeing how much "background" you need to already know before you can actually ask the question.

    Sit down with hubby and tell him you want to start working on how to respond to what-ifs, and that then you want everybody to practice those responses to see if they really would work. It should be fun instead of "work" and if it does turn into "work" stop and assess why it's not being fun.

    Quite a few of us run "what-if" scenarios several times a day. Like "what-if" I use this brand's coupon instead of buying the usual brand of X? Or "What-if" instead of a salad for lunch I have that double-bacon cheeseburger I really want? Or "what-if" that car in front of me blows a tire and winds up in my lane? Or "what-if" that guy who I've never seen in the neighborhood comes over to my house and tries to open the front screen door?

    But there is no one answer to any of the "what-ifs" out there. A basic plan and an open mind are a lot better than a one-size-fits-all response. You are doing great in wondering about what to do. Just don't expect any of our answers to be "the" solution.

    stay safe.
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by j4l View Post
    From my own experience- Im going to suggest a couple of things both along the lines above- and a bit outside the box.

    1) Alarms -be it with a subscription-type service, or just local to notify you and folks nearby- There are a wide range of options out there to suit a lot of budgets. Also do not neglect exterior lighting, and If you can acquire them- cameras and a monitor. There are wireless cams out there now that you can connect to your computer/laptop etc. as well. One needs more than just hearing a dog bark or windows breaking to notify them of an intrusion- (what if you are in a room some distance from the break-in point, or have other things going on, that prevent you hearing it (or if an intruder with some actual skills conducts a stealthy entry).

    2) Dogs are great- and they are indeed more than just a security device to you. But 2 things come with that- 1 that you have to "know" your dog, and get a handle on determing if they are barking because they smell/hear an animal, or a neighbor's dog, or because of an actual danger. A lot of folks (myself included in the past) ended up brushing off some barking to thinking the dog is barking again at a raccoon.. only to find out otherwise...
    The other, of course,is the attachment you will have to that 4-legged family member. In some cases an intruder wont think twice about killing your dog on their way in-to eliminate that hazzard to them, if nothing else, as happened to me last year.

    3)Plans... there;s a double-edged sword to plans. You cant account for every concievable situation that can come up.
    Murphy isnt going to allow an intruder to appear when you and others in the home are in just the right places, at just the right times, to either sweep and clear, cover one another, or retreat to some "safe" room.
    When trouble comes knocking, it's going to be when your sitting on the toilet in the house alone, when you are deep asleep, or in the shower, etc. Come up with a reasonable set of responses, and train together (as a couple) in whatever ways you can. Work out some basics- especially means of communicating both verbally or with hand-signaling (ya, sounds corny- but sometimes you dont want the bad guy to hear you and the hubby working out a strategy from two different ends of the house..)
    Main thing is- keep plans, and options as flexible as possible. Adhering to some concrete plan or drill will only make things worse, when you find the situations you've planned for and trained for arent panning out that way.

    4) With that child around- scratch any plans of sweep and clear. Priority One is get that child to the safest,most defendable location you can, and go from there.
    Agreed! No one can anticipate every scenario or exactly how each event will happen; I'm just hoping to get enough ideas to have guidelines to follow rather than panic.

    Quote Originally Posted by skidmark View Post
    PPM - The point was not to get you to answer questions but to understand that you need a plan - or two or three, depending on what you are planning for and what you plan to do about it. And to get you to start seeing how much "background" you need to already know before you can actually ask the question.

    Sit down with hubby and tell him you want to start working on how to respond to what-ifs, and that then you want everybody to practice those responses to see if they really would work. It should be fun instead of "work" and if it does turn into "work" stop and assess why it's not being fun.

    Quite a few of us run "what-if" scenarios several times a day. Like "what-if" I use this brand's coupon instead of buying the usual brand of X? Or "What-if" instead of a salad for lunch I have that double-bacon cheeseburger I really want? Or "what-if" that car in front of me blows a tire and winds up in my lane? Or "what-if" that guy who I've never seen in the neighborhood comes over to my house and tries to open the front screen door?

    But there is no one answer to any of the "what-ifs" out there. A basic plan and an open mind are a lot better than a one-size-fits-all response. You are doing great in wondering about what to do. Just don't expect any of our answers to be "the" solution.

    stay safe.
    Indeed. That's why I'm here. I don't expect any one answer to be the ultimate solution; just looking for different perspectives from other people that might think of something I haven't. The more advice and ideas I can learn from, the better prepared I'll be in making my own plan

  20. #20
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    What's more important than 'what to do' is 'how to analyze'. The replies above are great but they can only apply to your situation in a general sense and those posting it are aware of this.

    You have to keep analyzing, keep gathering information, but WHEN YOU REALIZE something the problem is acting on it. You know you need an alarm but the inertia is heavy, it's not super-cheap, and it takes planning and commitment. There is often 'sticker shock'. But realize that 'pay it later' in the form of being invaded and losing your sense of self, being sensitized and feeling unsafe in your home, it not worth it being frugal.

    It's a matter of LAYERING. You will forget to alarm, to lock a door, to bring the dog in, to turn on the motion sensors, and so forth but it's unlikely you will forget all of the layers. In addition it's great if you can live in a gated community (another layer). Put down as many layers as you can.

    It must be, in the end, TRANSPARENT. You can't keep doing something that's laborious. Sooner or later you'll drop it. Figure out how to get this transparency. I can talk about it more if you don't understand.

    You are just creating TIME and DISTANCE - no locks, dogs, lights, alarms are going to PREVENT intrusion. It's only important that you get time to react.

    If at all possible, have a safe room, a hidey hole or someplace that's not obvious that you are there.

    Be CONSISTENT - make sure you scour the room before going to bed to make sure you didn't leave weapons lying about, doors are locked, lights, alarms on.

    Remember that your VEHICLE is also vulnerable. To find you the BG has to know where you live. Out in the world he just has to encounter you serendipitously.

    Learn to think tactically even if it seems to be too much. You can always back off.

    Get training. There is stuff you haven't thought of even if you have the 'knack' for tactical analysis.

    HTH.

    Great replies from since9 and others. Kudos!
    A gun in a holster is better than one drawn and dispensing bullets. Concealed forces the latter. - ixtow

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  21. #21
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    Agreed on the time/distance thing. The alarms, dogs, lights,cameras, etc. are:

    1) (hopefully) a deterrent to most folks inclined to break in.

    2) When that fails, though, they provide you the "early warning" that can make a huge differernce between having some kind of time to prepare and react, and being taken by total surprise.

    Another thing- i didnt read all of the replies, so forgive me if repeating something- dry-firing. Snap -caps and the like, and if you can get them, the little laser-training modules- are great training aids, without having to expend ammo. And you can do them safely within the home. (they of course do not prepare you for the bang, muzzle-blast/flash of firing in confined spaces and in the dark, but..)
    At the very least they provide a good means of practicing the motor-skills (which are perishable skills) for quick-drawing and getting that all-important 1st shot off. They are also good for practicing the things you will NOT be able to do at any firing range vs. stationary, paper targets- the ability to practice drawing and firing from odd or awkward positions- ie: lying on the couch/bed, sitting at a table, etc.

  22. #22
    Regular Member RPGamingGirl's Avatar
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    I'm really glad to see a post like this and read through the responses. Every situation is different, every house is different, and every neighborhood is different, but here's what i would do out in rural SW Missouri:

    Scenario 1: It's daytime, my husband is asleep upstairs (or gone) and I am downstairs with our 4 month old son. An intruder starts forcing his way into my home.

    My husband works nights and is almost always asleep during the bulk of the day. What i would do, is make sure the baby is in the safest place possible (on the floor, behind the cover of something big like a couch if you feel like you have time), chamber a round, and fire as soon as i'm in line of sight of the intruder, assuming it's not a child. Anything else is fair game. Maybe it's a lost, drunk neighbor and you've just done harm to someone that didn't intend to hurt you, but you cannot take that chance. If someone's forcing their way into your home, you have to assume they're willing and able to hurt you.

    Scenario 2: We are both home, and on the same level of the house. An intruder breaks in.

    If my husband and i are both aware of the situation and in the same level of the house, i would grab the kids and make sure they were low and behind cover. I hate to be sexist or presumptuous, but even the most educated and enlightened man, pumped full of adrenaline and uncertainty, will have trouble allowing his wife to do something dangerous if he thinks he can stop her. Multiply that exponentially if there are kids in the house. It's better to just anticipate that and make yourself and the kids scarce--besides, if God Forbid something happened to the kids while you were backing up your husband, there's not a mother alive that could forgive herself. Better to avoid that. I would stay in the "safe" room with the kids until my husband (or some sort of third party i could trust) came to tell me all is clear. Do not leave the kids if you hear gunshots. Do not leave the kids if it's suddenly quiet. But by all means, be ready to shoot anything that comes through the door or window without announcing itself as your husband or local law enforcement (and even then, demand to see identification).

    Scenario 3: It's nighttime, my husband is gone, and I hear an intruder break in.

    Having a husband that works the night shift, this is sort of my go-to paranoid delusion, so i think about it constantly. In fact, i dream about it pretty much constantly. First things first, you have to think about where the baby is. Does he sleep with you? If so, you can place him somewhere (relatively) safe, and then assess the situation and go chasing after bad guys if it seems appropriate. If the baby is in another room, and you know where the intruder is, stop the intruder first, then grab the baby and get somewhere behind cover in case the intruder wasn't alone. If you don't know where the intruder is, make sure it ISN'T the nursery, then prepare to stand your ground.

    My situation is a little different; my kids are older (between 5 and 10), and understand that if they hear gunshots, they are to get low and not move until we tell them to. They can also scream for help, so i've got to trust my instincts and assess the situation as i go.

    Scenario 4: I come home with my son, and enter upon an intruder in the act.

    Leave! Get a safe distance from the house and call for help. You should only engage an intruder if you're already inside and possibly in danger. There's no reason to put yourself in danger, so if the bad guy is not between you and the door, grab the baby and run! If your husband is home by himself, think good thoughts and hope he can protect himself. He will do much better if he doesn't have to worry about you and your son too.

  23. #23
    Campaign Veteran Verd's Avatar
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    I don't think i need to repeat what others upthread have said, but there are a few things I would like to make mention of.

    If you have any thought of the possibility that you might have to fire a gun with your child present, make sure to get a dedicated pair of ear protection for the kid and have it with you as often as you keep your gun on you. You might not have any time to put it on your child, but if you do, you'll be glad to have it. You know, just in case.

    Secondly, since you prefer to shoot with both hands and I am assuming that you do not want to leave your child while you take care of the BG, you might want to look into and invest into a baby sling. My wife, as well as I, used them with our kids and they worked great. Keep the kid right up against you and safe, while letting you use both arms without a disadvantage. Or perhaps one of those baby backpack things, since you don't really want your kid be between you and the BG like a sling woutl put them, while a baby backpack would give your child that much more protection.
    One loves to possess arms, though they hope never to have occasion for them. Thomas Jefferson to George Washington, 1796.
    If someone has a gun and is trying to kill you, it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun. - Dalai Lama (Seattle Times, 05-15-2001).
    Find businesses that are pro gun and those that aren't. Support Friend or Foe by using it!

  24. #24
    Regular Member Wolfgang1952's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Since my husband is allergic to dogs, we can't really go that route.


    Welcome to the forum. I know you said your husband is allergic to dogs. But have you looked into Standard Poodles. They are very smart and train well and they don’t shed like normal Dogs do
    Last edited by Wolfgang1952; 10-06-2011 at 03:10 AM.
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  25. #25
    Regular Member Haz.'s Avatar
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    Down Under, if one is a person of good character, has undergone all the checks and balances and has the apropriate licences and is fortunate enough to have firearms in the home, which must by law be locked up in a gun safe and the ammunition must by law be locked in a seperate container, and unless the intruder can be persuaded to wait a minute or two whilst one gets the firearm out of the safe, unlocks the separate ammunition container, loads the firearm, and returns to the room the intruder is breaking into, one may as well dial a Pizza or the Ambulance, for I hear they often arrive much quicker than police who are nine time out of ten busy attending to another matter?
    Last edited by Haz.; 10-07-2011 at 12:43 AM.
    When a criminal invades your home and has a gun and is trying to kill you, it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun.

    My Definition of Gun Control: The idea that dozens of people found dead in the Broadway Café, Tasmania, and many also seriously wounded, all while waiting for police, who were called to show up and protect them, is somehow morally superior to having several armed and therefore alive civilian's explaining to police how the attacker got that fatal bullet wound.

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