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Thread: My boyfriend's antique rifle

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    My boyfriend's antique rifle

    I have a boyfriend who has has an antique 1800's model rifle that was his Grandfather's. It still works but is not as accurate if he wants to take it to a range. Also, he can't find any bullets for it either. There are many people who prefer their antiques as opposed to buying new products. It may sound dumb but I think there should be a law requiring bullet companies to be knowledgeable about antique models. Same thing applies for an antique watch. He has one of those that he can't get fixed anywhere.

    Leah

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    Short answer: no.

    Long answer: We don't need any more gov't control of the firearms industry than we already have. In fact, imo, we need far less than we have right now. A law requiring ammo companies to know about antiques would drive up the price of ammo, since they'd be expected (even if not required) to stock ammo for said antique, among other reasons.

    A tip for you on the antique ammo: take the gun to a well-respected collector or antique gunsmith. He can tell you what it fires and if it's even in a condition to be fired. My dad has an old .32 Rimfire revolver from the Spanish-American War that we did this with. We found out the caliber, and that it was in good enough condition to fire. A word of warning though: the ammo ain't cheap. 50 rounds cost $50 at a local gunshow. Nearly twice that online.

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    Founder's Club Member thebigsd's Avatar
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    Agreed, an ammo law is a bad idea. There are dozens of obsolete calibers. There are numerous companies who specialize in older ammunition. A quick google search for the caliber should help you find something. Of course, there are just some calibers that you won't find because there is little or no demand for them. For example, I have an old European velo-dog type revolver chambered in 6mm. I keep the gun for it's historical value and because it looks pretty cool. If you post the caliber you need here, I am sure some folks will help you try to find it.
    Last edited by thebigsd; 11-02-2011 at 05:27 PM.
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    While we're at it, I have this Model T that needs a new magneto. I've made my plea to Ford....but so far, my desperate cries for OEM antique parts has fallen on deaf ears, and for the love of Pete, I can't imagine why. I mean, all ten of us Model T enthusiasts could probably earn Ford Motor Co. at least a modest pile of dollar bills.

    And the guys at the Wal-Mart watch department also couldn't find a place for the battery?

    Hard times, lass. Hard times indeed.

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    Activist Member golddigger14s's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leah View Post
    It may sound dumb but I think there should be a law requiring bullet companies to be knowledgeable about antique models. Same thing applies for an antique watch. He has one of those that he can't get fixed anywhere.

    Leah
    It may sound "dumb"? I hate to disparage posters, but "really?". A law to provide ammo (or batteries for watches) for guns manufactured over a hundred years ago? Although, at least the guy has a significant other that is pro-gun.
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    Regular Member Baked on Grease's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leah View Post
    I have a boyfriend who has has an antique 1800's model rifle that was his Grandfather's. It still works but is not as accurate if he wants to take it to a range. Also, he can't find any bullets for it either. There are many people who prefer their antiques as opposed to buying new products. It may sound dumb but I think there should be a law requiring bullet companies to be knowledgeable about antique models. Same thing applies for an antique watch. He has one of those that he can't get fixed anywhere.

    Leah
    Easy answer for you, find out what ammo it shoots and if you can't find what you need at a gunshow go find a respectable gunsmith (a real gunsmith, not a certified glock armourer that learned what screws to tighten, not to be disparaging to anyones hard work ) and ask said gunsmith to make you some ammo.

    Will be rather expensive, and unsafe considering the age of the rifle, but it is possible without any new laws.

    Derailing topic shamelessly: whatever happened to laws prohibiting things and actions? Now we have people think nothing of enacting laws to essentially enslave someone else to do something for you. ><

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    Regular Member MilProGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigsd View Post

    There are dozens of obsolete calibers.

    There are numerous companies who specialize in older ammunition. A quick google search for the caliber should help you find something. Of course, there are just some calibers that you won't find because there is little or no demand for them.

    If you post the caliber you need here, I am sure some folks will help you try to find it.
    I'm in agreement with thebigsd. You should be able to find the info you need by doing a little research on the web.

    I have a couple of antique rifles, but prefer not to shoot them for reasons of personal safety.

    Good luck in your quest.
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    Regular Member 09jisaac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leah View Post
    I have a boyfriend who has has an antique 1800's model rifle that was his Grandfather's. It still works but is not as accurate if he wants to take it to a range. Also, he can't find any bullets for it either. There are many people who prefer their antiques as opposed to buying new products. It may sound dumb but I think there should be a law requiring bullet companies to be knowledgeable about antique models. Same thing applies for an antique watch. He has one of those that he can't get fixed anywhere.

    Leah
    Serious thought here, how bout you just don't shoot it??? If there is ever an argument for a safe queen, this would be it.

    1. Maybe not safe to shoot.
    2. Expensive to shoot if you can get ammo
    3. Collectors item.
    4. Not accurate.
    5. Family heirloom

    And you won't make many friends around her pushing for more laws. Especially any that pertain to the gun industry.

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    Founder's Club Member thebigsd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 09jisaac View Post
    SNIP Serious thought here, how bout you just don't shoot it??? If there is ever an argument for a safe queen, this would be it.
    There is a certain allure to shooting an older gun. You can feel the history, if that makes sense. As long as it has been checked by a competent gunsmith then you should be good to go. Shooting it a couple times a year is not going to break te bank. Not accurate? Who cares, I doubt they are using it for defense or competition.

    What the heck is a safe queen?? Guns are made to SHOOT!!
    Last edited by thebigsd; 11-03-2011 at 04:16 PM.
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    Regular Member hermannr's Avatar
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    Come on guys, a little lighter on the lady. No, we don't want any more laws (of any kind), but rather fewer laws...but, you know what, some people haven't got to that point yet.

    Anyway, on any antique firearm, if you do not know the precise history, it is much safer to take the weapon to a collector of that type of weapon, or a real gunsmith to evaluate. You really need to.

    I remember my FIL had a matched pair of very high end old English doubles, (back in the 60's they were worth about $25K.) They had never been proofed for smokeless powder and he was cnstantly afraid someone was going to shoot modern ammo in them and turn them into junk....that is the kind of thing you need to worry about with really old guns. Not can you find ammo, but can you find the correct ammo, and what is the "correct" ammo? Black powder only? or can you use smokeless?

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    for watch repair

    do a Yahoo or Google search for the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors. Once on their web site you can search for a watch maker in your area/state. I have a dozen antique pocket watches and it is indeed hard to find a competent watch maker to repair a watch. Don't let just any employee in a jewelry store screw around with it.

    Do you know what kind of watch it is? If you PM the watch's info to me I may be able to help. Unscrew the back and there will be a serial number on the "works" (another serial number will be on the inside of the back but that's for the case, not the works). With the brand, model, and serial number I can probably give you some good info on it.

    As for firing the antique gun, BE CAREFUL.

    cheers,
    roN

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    Leah, do you have any idea how many different calibers of ammunition there have been in the last 150 years?

    Most big ammunition manufacturers produce only the most popular calibers, but there are hundreds of small specialists producing almost every kind of ammo ever made. Your proposal would simply drive them all out of business, because no one company can make them all.

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    Regular Member Lord_Kalen's Avatar
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    What is it ? Post Pics ....

    Buffalo Arms has lots of brass for antique cartridges , and if they dont have the exact brass you can usually reform something to make it work .... Hel , theres even kits for reloading pinfires out there only think your really screwed on it rimfires that arent currently manufactured and in many of the big bores there are options to convert them to centerfire and form brass for them

    Unless the gun is in very poor condition you can also often do severely reduced cartidge loads

    You do have to be very carefull at times with factory ammunition and older guns with the 7.63/7.62x25 cartridge for example there were about 4 different notable loads all in the same case all fully chamberable in guns that are designed to use the cartidge with majorly different loads , the 7.63 mannlicher for example offers about 1000fps muzzle out of a direct blowback pistol while 7.62x25 smg loads would chamber , and possibly send the round out of the barrel at 1700 fps and hopefully only slightly damage the gun ... with no injury to the user ... hopefully

    Then theres the German 8mm , in 1905 they went from a .318 projectile to a .323 , increased the weight of the projectile aswell as the powder charge ..... the resulting round fits in pre 1905 rifles ...

    And like mentioned before many cartridges were originally Black powder , then transitioned to smokeless which is both faster burning and more powerfull significantly increasing chamber pressure , also with shotguns many were chambered for shells shorter then the standard 2-3/4 of today ... which will fit into a shorter chamber but cause over pressure when the crimp expands



    this all being said , with abit of research most antiques are perfectly capable of being shooters and I am personally fond of old guns as OC pieces

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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigsd View Post
    There is a certain allure to shooting an older gun. You can feel the history, if that makes sense. As long as it has been checked by a competent gunsmith then you should be good to go. Shooting it a couple times a year is not going to break te bank. Not accurate? Who cares, I doubt they are using it for defense or competition.

    What the heck is a safe queen?? Guns are made to SHOOT!!
    Safe Queen: The ruler of the safe. Most of the time she sits in the safe lording over her domain, but on occasion when she comes forth to speak all observe her elegance and grace in awe. Those targeted by her percussion learn the meaning of the phrase "hell hath no fury...".
    Don't believe any facts that I say! This is the internet and it is filled with lies and untruth. I invite you to look up for yourself the basic facts that my arguments might be based upon. This way we can have a discussion where logic and hints on where to find information are what is brought to the forum and people look up and verify facts for themselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigsd View Post
    There is a certain allure to shooting an older gun. You can feel the history, if that makes sense. As long as it has been checked by a competent gunsmith then you should be good to go. Shooting it a couple times a year is not going to break te bank. Not accurate? Who cares, I doubt they are using it for defense or competition.
    Agreed. My dad's .32 Rimfire from the Spanish-American War is ridiculously inaccurate, but it's fun as hell to shoot. Finding ammo for it was a huge PITA though.

    Also, I want to apologize to Leah. Hermannr is right. A legitimate question was asked, and we shouldn't jump down her throat in our answers. For that, I'm sorry.

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    I guess I should demand that Wal-Mart carry 11.3x51R, so that I can shoot the old Beaumont-Vitali whenever I want. I guess I'll settle for them having .45 ACP when I need it, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oramac View Post
    A legitimate question was asked, and we shouldn't jump down her throat in our answers. For that, I'm sorry.
    Except there wasn't a single question submitted... The OP didn't even ask for help, unless passive aggressive statements count as such; the post is utterly lacking in any detail which might be useful to even the most helpful and knowing amongst us. You know, unless we've got a psychic, historical gun nut on the board, I guess.

    Oh, we know it's from the 1800's, so it could be anything from a later model Brown Bess to a 1892 Winchester repeater. We don't even know if it's a long gun or a handgun, or if it's a common piece or some priceless artifact. Heck, it could be a freshly uncrated M1895 Gatling gun some dude stuffed into an attic.

    Nah...this wasn't a thread created to seek wisdom. It was created as a rant. And, you know that's alright as long as you welcome a little rant in return.

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    Regular Member Lord_Kalen's Avatar
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    CO-JOE

    your forgetting C-96s ( personal OC piece of choice ) mausers , Maxims , M1895 browning "potato digger" MGS and many other automatic weapons .... but yeah 1800s covers weapons from flintlocks ( and matchlocks in many less developed countries) to "modern" bolt actions , semi autos and revolvers

    Leah .... pics .... info .... then we can give advice as to ammunition or conversion

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