Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Poll to hit

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Toano, VA
    Posts
    23

    Poll to hit

    FYI,

    Should Virginia drop its criminal background check for firearm purchases, and rely on the federal system?

    http://hamptonroads.com/2011/11/virg...les-challenged

  2. #2
    Regular Member 45acpForMe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,803
    It was 59% against and 40% for getting rid of the state check when I voted.

    The article lauds all the extra benefits of keeping it but like many "systems" it is far from perfect.

    I personally know of a man who took his dad's car for a joy ride (stole) and was convicted of a felony when he was 16. With that he couldn't buy a firearm until he was 28 under the law. Unfortunately 16 year olds don't pay attention to the details so when he was 24 he legally bought a firearm at a Hampton gunshow via an FFL and passed state and federal checks. It wasn't until he was pulled over after buying pot that they found the cased & unloaded gun in his trunk and reminded him that he wasn't allowed to have a gun. So now he is a convicted adult felon never to own a gun again. So whether or not the "system" is supposed to catch all these special cases I know for a fact it doesn't.

  3. #3
    Regular Member wylde007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Va Beach, Occupied VA
    Posts
    3,037

    Angry

    The poll is skewed once again by its wording. Drop the "state" background check in favor of the federal one.

    How about drop ALL background checks. Our founders didn't have to pass a "background check" to buy armaments. If they'd submitted to such tyranny we'd still be bowing to an heir of Cornwallis.

    The quiet war has begun, with silent weapons
    And the newest slavery is to keep the people poor, and stupid
    Novos ordo seclorum ~ Mustaine

    Never argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

  4. #4
    Regular Member 2a4all's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Newport News, VA, ,
    Posts
    1,586
    Quote Originally Posted by 45acpForMe View Post
    It was 59% against and 40% for getting rid of the state check when I voted.

    The article lauds all the extra benefits of keeping it but like many "systems" it is far from perfect.

    I personally know of a man who took his dad's car for a joy ride (stole) and was convicted of a felony when he was 16. With that he couldn't buy a firearm until he was 28 under the law. Unfortunately 16 year olds don't pay attention to the details so when he was 24 he legally bought a firearm at a Hampton gunshow via an FFL and passed state and federal checks. It wasn't until he was pulled over after buying pot that they found the cased & unloaded gun in his trunk and reminded him that he wasn't allowed to have a gun. So now he is a convicted adult felon never to own a gun again. So whether or not the "system" is supposed to catch all these special cases I know for a fact it doesn't.
    I've heard of things like this, too. But they have hinged on whether the individual knew that their juvenile conviction would have been a felony if they had been an adult at the time of the offense and/or if the juvenile record was sealed.

    True, no system is perfect, and some will filter through. But the system (VA or Fed) which provides the better screen should be the one used. Doesn't the present VA check supercede the Fed check, i.e the result(s) of the VA check are simply accepted by the Feds? At least this way, VA has control over who is included/deleted in any "prohibited person" lists, which should make things easier for persons whose status changes from "prohibited" to "permitted". Locally issued protective orders (notice of which doesn't always make it to the Feds in a timely fashion) come to mind.

    Communication between the VA and Fed systems is necessary if prohibited persons are to be stopped for interstate attempts at firearm purchases. Recently, an individual wanted for murder in MD (IIRC) tried to buy a gun at Bob's (in Norfolk), but was tripped up via the (Fed?) BG check. If only the VA system had been available without exchange of data,, he might not have been caught.

    If there were no BG checks, would we be at any greater risk of harm by violent individuals than we are now? A few more criminals would likely have guns, but they would be subject to (additional) prosecution under existing statutes that make it a crime to posses a firearm while engaged in their already unlawful activity. Since criminals will ignore the law to arm themselves (for protection against other criminals?), removing barriers to law abiding citizens obtaining tools of self protection seems to be the prudent course to take.
    A law-abiding citizen should be able to carry his personal protection firearm anywhere that an armed criminal might go.

    Member VCDL, NRA

  5. #5
    Regular Member TFred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Most historic town in, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    7,705
    Quote Originally Posted by GasCharged View Post
    FYI,

    Should Virginia drop its criminal background check for firearm purchases, and rely on the federal system?

    http://hamptonroads.com/2011/11/virg...les-challenged
    From the article:

    "Our state police are leaders in the country in processing background checks," keeping guns away from those disqualified to purchase them and apprehending those who try to illegally obtain firearms, said Lori Haas, a board member with the Virginia Center for Public Safety and the mother of a student shot at Virginia Tech in 2007.
    Ha. Maybe she and Bloomberg need to get their stories straight...

    TFred

  6. #6
    Regular Member Repeater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,519
    What's hilarious are the Virginia Statists who attempt to justify the status-quo by impugning the NICS system. The Congressional bill that gun-control groups supported in 2007 was called the The NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007. "Improvement" -- get it?

    Clearly, the Brady Campaign liked it.

  7. #7
    Regular Member Repeater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,519

    Save money as "Reform"

    Reform can be good, right?

    Well, saving money is good, too:

    Governor to get long list of reforms
    On Monday, Gov. Bob McDonnell will receive the latest package of proposals designed to save state tax dollars and increase efficiency from his government reform commission.

    In its second year of work, the panel has made nearly 40 recommendations to shed various boards and committees, consolidate departments and deregulate industries.

    ...

    That would amount to a considerable cost savings, though no estimate was available. Asked if the changes, specifically the consolidations, would result in job losses, Chairman Fred Malek replied: "Yes, there would be some."
    Perhaps gun owners can suggest closing the FTC as a way to cut costs.

    We could send our opinions to them:

    Governor McDonnell’s Government Reform & Restructuring Commission

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •