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Thread: Teaching Kids Situational Awareness

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    Regular Member Jack House's Avatar
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    Teaching Kids Situational Awareness

    For those that teach their kids(or someone else's) about situational awareness. How do you go about that?

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    Regular Member MatieA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack House View Post
    For those that teach their kids(or someone else's) about situational awareness. How do you go about that?
    Hide n Seek more or less. It's a great way to teach kids observational skills, and awareness, and they get to have fun too.
    If you do not test yourself every single day,
    then it is just another wasted day.
    --Semper Fi--

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    Regular Member Jack House's Avatar
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    That's exactly what I was thinking. And harmless pranks for the older kids.

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    Regular Member MatieA's Avatar
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    I also teach my daughter how to track. I'm not a pro, but I teach her what I know. Learning how to identify different markings and scrapes makes her look at things a lot differently.
    If you do not test yourself every single day,
    then it is just another wasted day.
    --Semper Fi--

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    Regular Member RPGamingGirl's Avatar
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    Well, if you let them do their own thing, they'll teach each other (ie: jump out and scare each other, compete to find the coolest stuff in the woods or on the beach, etc.).

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    Regular Member MatieA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPGamingGirl View Post
    Well, if you let them do their own thing, they'll teach each other (ie: jump out and scare each other, compete to find the coolest stuff in the woods or on the beach, etc.).
    Not when your nearest neighbor is a mile a way, and 5 miles to the nearest house with kids. Otherwise that would be a good thing. Sometimes you need to help, besides I like playing with my kids; even if I look silly doing it.
    If you do not test yourself every single day,
    then it is just another wasted day.
    --Semper Fi--

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    Regular Member Redbaron007's Avatar
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    At different stages in their life, I've taken an opportunity to use circumstances that happened to others or the family, to illustrate the need to be alert.

    An example, my 19 year old daughter was coming ome from work Monday night, 11:00 pm; she saw a van leave the mall when she did. Upon getting two blocks from the house, low and behold she saw the van again (or one very similar). She drove a different route to see if the van or other vehicle was following her. She then drove to a supermarket close by and pulled up to the front door to see if the van followed her. After determining it wasn't, she returned home, cautiously.

    This circumstance was discussed and reviewed back when she first got her drivers license; it was prompted from when one of her classmates at HS was nabbed by her ex-boyfriend. She was ultimately found alive, but bruised and sexually assaulted. We sat down and analyzed this scenario when it occurred to see what would have been a better route for this young lady to have taken, instead of letting this ex get his hands on her.

    I was very proud of how my daughter handled herself the other night. She remained calm and stayed focused on making good choices, but the adrenaline was flowing.

    YMMV.

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    Small duffle filled with Flash-Bangs.


    You'd be amazed how well those work -on anyone- when you sneak up on em, and lob an FB into the room...
    They tend to become extremely situationally aware, from then on,..

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    Regular Member Redbaron007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC for ME View Post
    Situational awareness? SITUATIONAL AWARENESS?? SITUATIONAL AWARENESS???

    Heck, I can't get my two boys to keep it inside the bowl when they go to the bathroom, let alone lift the seat up. I'll work on harder stuff when I get past that.

    I would work on the aim, not the situational awareness.......sounds like they know where to go!!

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    Regular Member Redbaron007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC for ME View Post
    True, but knowing how to get there is not the same as paying attention to what it is you are supposed to do once there.


    Lucky you!! I have three daughters and one son....he was easy...his mother swore to him, if he didn't get better at aiming, after she got done with him, he would have to sit down!!

    He figured it out real quick! He also like hitting the Cheerios!

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    Regular Member RPGamingGirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MatieA View Post
    Not when your nearest neighbor is a mile a way, and 5 miles to the nearest house with kids. Otherwise that would be a good thing. Sometimes you need to help, besides I like playing with my kids; even if I look silly doing it.
    Ah, well yeah, my kids are all about 2 years apart, so if i stand back they usually learn more from each other than i would have thought to teach them myself.

    I was an only child and didn't really have friends; my dad took me camping a lot with his best friend who was an ex bounty hunter. They taught me a lot of odd skills, lol. Mostly i would just wander off on my own, and they would wait and let me find my way back. I guess they were confident they could find me if i went too far. Maybe i should have been terrified, lol. But i figured out how to determine what direction i was going and remember landmarks, figure what animals were around by tracks, sound, and sometimes smell (!). They just sort of pointed me in the right direction and waited to see what i came up with. I guess it was a mix of awareness training and critical thinking exercises.

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    Campaign Veteran since9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack House View Post
    For those that teach their kids(or someone else's) about situational awareness. How do you go about that?
    Let them run into walls. It hurts, but true learning involves pain.

    Don't let them kill or serious injure themselves.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

  13. #13
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    I use simple questions designed to test my little one's ability to observe and recall things going on around us.
    - What color was the shirt the man in the black jacket was wearing?
    - Were where the hands of the lady wearing the hat?
    - How many people did we just pass?
    - Where is an exit?
    - What was the first thing placed in the cart?
    I'll also toss in a couple Are you sure response questions for good measure.
    I have found that this provides an added benefit of keeping them behaving correctly out in public too since I refuse to be THAT GUY with the unruly children.
    Last edited by Toad; 12-03-2011 at 11:30 AM.

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    Campaign Veteran since9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j4l View Post
    They tend to become extremely situationally aware, from then on,..
    I believe the medical term for this is "hyper-vigilant PTSD..."

    Flash bangs... Sheesh!

    The way I approach this is I pick out things I know he's not noticing, but which he either should be or is about to, given his age, and I simply ask him about it. Such as, "Do you see the puppy with the different-colored ears?" when he was three, to "I wonder why those two guys are just sitting in that car, watching all the school children walk by?" when he was 9.

    He actually answer that one smack on: "Could be they're waiting to take some kid. Or maybe they're just friends and are waiting for one of their own kids."

    BANG!

    He's aware, but well-grounded. He's not over-the-top.

    How'd you like that flash-bang, j4l?
    Last edited by since9; 12-04-2011 at 04:07 AM.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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