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Thread: Firearm posession at voting location

  1. #1
    Regular Member GlockRDH's Avatar
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    Firearm posession at voting location

    Am i mistaken or have I read on here that a polling place is (unless otherwise prohibited) a prohibited carry location?

  2. #2
    Regular Member paul@paul-fisher.com's Avatar
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    As long as it isn't posted or a school, carry away! I will be carrying.

    Sent from my SCH-I500 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Regular Member GlockRDH's Avatar
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    I wonder if i was reading something from another state?? thats the problem with OCDO...lol.. too much info to keep straight in my head!

  4. #4
    Herr Heckler Koch
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlockRDH View Post
    Am i mistaken or have I read on here that a polling place is (unless otherwise prohibited) a prohibited carry location?
    In other states, e.g. South Carolina. Don't give the gun controllers right or left any new ideas.
    Last edited by Herr Heckler Koch; 01-29-2012 at 11:17 AM.

  5. #5
    Regular Member markush's Avatar
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    Restricting carry in polling places was in one of the amendments that the Dems tried to pass. Maybe that's where you got it from.

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    But I bet those same dem's applaud the members of the New Black Panther party who were trying to intimidate white voters at the polls in 2008

  7. #7
    Regular Member MKEgal's Avatar
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    +1: as long as it's not posted, nothing wrong with exercising several rights at once.

    Since my polling place is a high school (thug factory),
    and my alternative (early) polling place is a city building, & the city decided to make its buildings criminal empowerment zones,
    I've sent away for an absentee ballot, & will keep doing so until the situation changes for the better.

    My only question is, why can't college students do that?
    It'd be cheaper than printing new IDs or stickers.
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  8. #8
    Herr Heckler Koch
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    Voting rights?

    Voting rights? Aww, geeze, not this shiite again. There is no natural law, Constitutional, federal or Wisconsin right to vote.
    Last edited by Herr Heckler Koch; 01-29-2012 at 04:03 PM.

  9. #9
    Regular Member PQ36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herr Heckler Koch View Post
    Voting rights? Aww, geeze, not this shiite again. There is no natural law, Constitutional, federal or Wisconsin right to vote.
    ARTICLE III.
    SUFFRAGE
    Electors. SECTION 1. [As amended Nov. 1882, Nov. 1908,
    Nov. 1934; repealed April 1986; created April 1986] Every
    United States citizen age 18 or older who is a resident of an election
    district in this state is a qualified elector of that district.

    [1881 J.R. 26 A, 1882 J.R. 5, 1882 c. 272, vote Nov. 1882; 1905
    J.R. 15, 1907 J.R. 25, 1907 c. 661, vote Nov. 1908; 1931 J.R. 91,
    1933 J.R. 76, vote Nov. 1934; 1983 J.R. 30, 1985 J.R. 14, vote
    April 1986]
    The legislature can amend the current election statutes, without referendum, so
    as to make the statutes conform with the 26th amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
    61 Atty. Gen. 89.
    A proposal to amend a statute to allow nonresident property owners to vote on
    metropolitan sewerage district bonds, in addition to electors, probably would
    require the proposal to be submitted to a vote of the electorate under sec. 1. 63 Atty.
    Gen. 391.
    Even rational restrictions on the right to vote are invidious if they are unrelated
    to voter qualifications. However evenhanded restrictions that protect the integrity
    and reliability of the electoral process itself are not invidious. An Indiana statute
    requiring citizens voting in person on election day, or casting a ballot in person at
    the office of the circuit court clerk prior to election day, to present photo identification
    issued by the government did not violate constitutional standards. Crawford
    v. Marion County Election Board, 553 U.S. 181, 128 S. Ct. 1610, 170 L. Ed. 2d 574
    (2008).
    Constitutional law: residency requirements. 53 MLR 439.
    Implementation.


    SECTION 2.
    [As repealed April 1986;
    created April 1986] Laws may be enacted:
    (1) Defining residency.
    (2) Providing for registration of electors.
    (3) Providing for absentee voting.
    (4) Excluding from the right of suffrage persons:
    (a) Convicted of a felony, unless restored to civil rights.
    (b) Adjudged by a court to be incompetent or partially
    incompetent, unless the judgment specifies that the person is
    capable of understanding the objective of the elective process or
    the judgment is set aside.


    1) HHK, in which context are you using (no) "right" to vote? As in: "Rights come from the Creator, privileges from man" ?

    2)Article III, section 1 and 2 confer voting "right".

    3)Exodus 18:21 gives us a Biblical perspective on hierarchy/leadership, for a start.

    4)Can Article III, section 2(4)(a)&(b) be used to dis-qualify multitudes of dems?

    Genuinely seeking to understand your perspective.

  10. #10
    Herr Heckler Koch
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    I made the affirmative assertion, "there is", that a right to vote cannot be cited from any competent compendium of natural law, from the U. S. Constitution, from the Bill of Rights (the amendments disallow particular restrictions on enfranchisement), federal law or the Wisconsin Constitution.

    An effective controversion/contradiction might have the structure of, 'yes there is! Paragraph XX of this document says that all adults enjoy suffrage/enfranchisement/voting-rights. There is no such thing.

    Your cite from the Wisconsin Constitution establishes electors of a district, an argument as remote as United States Presidents are elected by the Electoral College and not by the people.

    "If a felon may properly be disbarred his rights (including his right to vote) under color of law then we can all be legally disarmed (and disenfranchised) merely by sufficiently lowering the bar of felony." No one quibbles 'no RKABA' yet few would restore felons' RKABA and fewer argue for felons enfranchisement.

  11. #11
    Regular Member PQ36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herr Heckler Koch View Post
    I made the affirmative assertion, "there is", that a right to vote cannot be cited from any competent compendium of natural law, from the U. S. Constitution, from the Bill of Rights (the amendments disallow particular restrictions on enfranchisement), federal law or the Wisconsin Constitution.

    An effective controversion/contradiction might have the structure of, 'yes there is! Paragraph XX of this document says that all adults enjoy suffrage/enfranchisement/voting-rights. There is no such thing.

    Your cite from the Wisconsin Constitution establishes electors of a district, an argument as remote as United States Presidents are elected by the Electoral College and not by the people.

    "If a felon may properly be disbarred his rights (including his right to vote) under color of law then we can all be legally disarmed (and disenfranchised) merely by sufficiently lowering the bar of felony." No one quibbles 'no RKABA' yet few would restore felons' RKABA and fewer argue for felons enfranchisement.
    I see where you're pointing regarding "district" and "Electoral College". Will have to digest more. (Somehow, also, the 17th amendment hoses up the original plan by allowing a subverted populace to affect EC. a)I forget precisely how it flows b)I digress )

    As far as I can see, I have a right to vote, regardless of the effectiveness or efficacy of such a vote, I still have a leg to stand on at the polling place, given Wis Article III and 26th amendment. Do you have a particular author/text that can be cited to support "There is no such thing." from your second paragraph above?

    Regarding felons: The conditional "if" in the above "if a felon may be properly disbarred....." is pivotal. I would argue that a felon cannot, should not, be disbarred rights, once his/her debt to society has been paid. If you can't hand 'em back their gun belt, as they leave the crowbar hotel, then why are they allowed to leave? I would be one of the few that argue for enfranchisement. Given the "totality of circumstances" of how far along we are down the road to communism, I can't imagine seeing that bell being un-rung, given the present level of subversion.

    On point, 2A at the polling place is contingent on, or a function of, political/legislative taxonomy, rather than based on anything substantive. Polling place at the local school? Oops, sorry, that (carry) isn't allowed! The other side of the imaginary line, well then, ok. Hogwash in reality. But then what is reality? What is "is"? Reality is only for those who have been called out of the matrix.

  12. #12
    Regular Member MKEgal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herr Heckler Koch
    Voting rights? Aww, geeze, not this shiite again. There is no natural law, Constitutional, federal or Wisconsin right to vote.
    Doug, we've been through this before.
    From the US Consitution:
    15th Amendment: "The right of citizens of the United States to vote..."
    19th Amendment: "The right of citizens of the United States to vote..."
    24th Amendment: "The right of citizens of the United States to vote...'
    26th Amendment: "The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote..."

    The 14th Amendment also mentions "the right to vote".

    Then there are the 9th & 10th Amendments, which are the catchalls:
    if we didn't specifically mention something, that doesn't mean it doesn't exist,
    &
    if we didn't specifically say the federal gov't can do something, that power is reserved to the people (sometimes via the states).

  13. #13
    Herr Heckler Koch
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    Procrustean amendments too? LOL Your devil is in the details that you would cut off

    The rest of the Constitutional Amendment story.

    • But when the right to vote ... is denied to any ... citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, ... the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion ... citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens ... State.
    • The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
    • The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.
    • The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax.
    • The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.
    Read it and weep.

    Yes, the Fourteenth Amendment mentions a hypothetical right to vote.

    These predicate amendments presume a hypothetical and nonexistent subject. My challenge, reiterated, is to cite an affirmative statement of a "right to vote." It cannot be done from natural law, Constitutional law, federal law or the Wisconsin Constitution or statutes.
    Last edited by Herr Heckler Koch; 01-31-2012 at 01:17 PM.

  14. #14
    Centurion
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    In Colonial America, some states required that you bring a gun to the poll

    Quote Originally Posted by GlockRDH View Post
    Am i mistaken or have I read on here that a polling place is (unless otherwise prohibited) a prohibited carry location?
    I am not sure when the legislatures started prohibited being armed at polling places. It might have been with the Sullivan law, which was passed in New York, in part, to make sure that only the organized thugs associated with the Tammany Gang were armed at the polls.

    It might have been during the Progressive push from 1900 to present to delegitimize guns in American society.

    Any information on when it happened, and who was behind it would be appreciated.

  15. #15
    Regular Member Fallschirmjäger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlockRDH View Post
    I wonder if i was reading something from another state?? thats the problem with OCDO...lol.. too much info to keep straight in my head!
    Could easily have been thinking of Georgia. Carrying within 46 meters (1,800 inches) of a polling place is one of the enumerated prohibited areas.

  16. #16
    Regular Member bigdaddy1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fallschirmjäger View Post
    Could easily have been thinking of Georgia. Carrying within 46 meters (1,800 inches) of a polling place is one of the enumerated prohibited areas.
    I would measure at 1805 inches and do the NENER, NENER thing
    What part of "shall not be infringed" don't you understand?

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