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Thread: What happens to your weapon if you are in an accident?

  1. #1
    Regular Member JesterP99's Avatar
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    What happens to your weapon if you are in an accident?

    So, I just thought of a question that I was hoping someone had an answer for.

    Say you are in an accident where transport to a hospital via an ambulance is needed. What happens to your firearm if you there isn't any family/friends around to take it for you?

    Scenario: You are walking back to your car in a parking lot when some old lady runs a crosswalk and hits you, you aren't seriously injured but you hit your head and lose consciousness for a few seconds. Some bystander sees this and calls 911 for an ambulance. When they arrive on scene they notice you are carrying a pistol and tell dispatch that the scene isn't safe due to the weapon and request PD to secure the scene before they proceed with medical treatment. PD arrives on scene, secures the weapon, although you protest, and then the ambulance crew recommends you get medical attention immediately and requests that they immobilize you on a long spine board. Long story short, you get put in the back of the ambulance and taken to the hospital. What happens to your firearm in this situation?

    Even if the ambulance crew decides that PD is not needed to secure the scene, they aren't going to let you take the gun into the hospital or back of the ambulance.

    Just curious if anyone has been in a situation like this. Was it difficult to get your firearm back?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Regular Member OC for ME's Avatar
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    I disagree with the premise that a properly holstered firearm makes the scene unsafe. If they do not touch the pistol, and you do not touch the pistol, no harm no foul.
    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson.

    "Better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer" - English jurist William Blackstone.
    It is AFAIK original to me. Compromise is failure on the installment plan, particularly when dealing with so intractable an opponent as ignorance. - Nightmare

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    Regular Member OC for ME's Avatar
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    ....uh....you ain't bringing the pistol in, they are, by taking you inside.

    "if you don't show me yours, i won't show you mine."....works every time.

    Though, you are correct, retain your firearm if permitted until a authorized friend/relative arrives. Protest if disarmed against your will. Request a receipt from whom ever disarmed you, on the spot, so that the hospital staff are witnesses to your firearm being seized. get the friend/relative to secure the weapon from whom ever seized it and have them lock it up in their vehicle. Likely, the cop/security dude will not release the firearm to the friend/relative, but ya never know.

    Great question. Hopefully I won't have a need to find out how it will really work.
    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson.

    "Better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer" - English jurist William Blackstone.
    It is AFAIK original to me. Compromise is failure on the installment plan, particularly when dealing with so intractable an opponent as ignorance. - Nightmare

  4. #4
    Regular Member JesterP99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC for ME View Post
    I disagree with the premise that a properly holstered firearm makes the scene unsafe. If they do not touch the pistol, and you do not touch the pistol, no harm no foul.
    Yeah, but an EMT isn't going to take that chance. Besides, just like an EMT doesn't have the right to restrain a patient, they also don't have the right to secure a weapon.

    Trust me, if I was the EMT responding to that call, I might not handle it that way, but anybody at Charlottesville Albemarle Rescue Squad would.

    And either way, they aren't going to transport a pt with a gun, they aren't going to let the gun into the hospital either, so it has to go somewhere. My question is whether or not is is difficult to get back from the police department after they secure it.

  5. #5
    Regular Member JesterP99's Avatar
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    If an answer isn't reached before school tomorrow, I will ask my instructor what happens in that situation, I am sure he will have an answer for me.

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    Guns are 'prohibited' in our hospital. I would transport pt and firearm there anyway. If its properly holstered and pt is alert, and if needed to remove his clothing, I'd place it in the cabinet. If weapon needs to be cleared and I have no idea how his gun works, I 'may' have him do it then secure it in the cabinet. If not and I see no threat to me, he can wear it. Security has a place to keep it for the pt.
    If it was me, my gun is going with me.

  8. #8
    Regular Member Outdoorsman1's Avatar
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    I have often thought about what would happen if I was rendered unconsious while carrying...?????

    One of the firearms safety classes I have taken, gave out a rubber wrist band (similar to the pink cancer awarness ones) that had their website on one side and "Trained Armed Citizen" on the other. I wear one on each wrist. If anybody goes to check my pulse, they will immeadiately know that I am armed which I belive to be a good thing if I am unconsious and being treated by medical personnel...

    The bands are black with yellow writing and are not able to be read from a disitance so it is not like I am advertizeing to the general public that I am carrying... that is of course unless they see my firearm while open carrying....

    As far as what happens to my firearm.. I can only hope and pray to God that whoever decides to remove it from my holster (for whatever reason), will be carefull enought to avoid an negligent discharge... As one of my carry firearms is a Glock 27... FULLY LOADED... and will fire with the pull of the trigger....

    In my opinion, this is the one and only reason that might even come close to justify carrying without a round in the chamber, but based on being ready, before the seconds it takes to chamber a round, I still choose to carry fully loaded..

    Outdoorsman1
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  9. #9
    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Go here http://forum.opencarry.org/forums/sh...t-your-firearm and read. Then go to Ambulance Driver's blog and see what the pros said.

    stay safe.
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

    Because stupidity isn't a race, and everybody can win.

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  10. #10
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    Deal with this often

    The paramedics usually take the gun off as they are cutting clothes off and what not. They usually hand it to the closest officer. I take the gun to the office, render it safe, and box it up. Then fill out a receipt and lock it up. Drive to the hospital provide you with a copy of the receipt and let you know where you can pick it up along with the crash info and where your car went. I handle around 200 crashes a year so it happens once a month or so.

    Only once have I had a family member at the scene to give it to. They usually head to the ER not the scene.

    Not hard to get firearm back, just will need to be during business hours when the evidence clerk is there. Bring ID just to make sure it is your property you are getting.

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