• We are now running on a new, and hopefully much-improved, server. In addition we are also on new forum software. Any move entails a lot of technical details and I suspect we will encounter a few issues as the new server goes live. Please be patient with us. It will be worth it! :) Please help by posting all issues here.
  • The forum will be down for about an hour this weekend for maintenance. I apologize for the inconvenience.
  • If you are having trouble seeing the forum then you may need to clear your browser's DNS cache. Click here for instructions on how to do that
  • Please review the Forum Rules frequently as we are constantly trying to improve the forum for our members and visitors.

2017 HB177 PURCHASE OF FIREARM AMENDMENTS

utbagpiper

Banned
Joined
Jul 5, 2006
Messages
4,061
Location
Utah
Let's see if every post in the Utah section attracts the pet trolls.

HB 177 by Paul Raul, http://le.utah.gov/~2017/bills/static/HB0177.html , appears to be housekeeping bill that simplifies the current language on allowing currently employed Utah peace officers to obtain a concealed carry permit or to buy a gun, without having to go through (and I presume pay for) the usual background check.

Charles
 

JoeSparky

Centurion
Joined
Jun 20, 2008
Messages
3,623
Location
Pleasant Grove, Utah, USA
This may be a simple "housekeeping" bill I object to the simple premise of granting government employees special privileges not granted to the citizenry.

You don't need to know what kind of device or tool was used to send this
 

utbagpiper

Banned
Joined
Jul 5, 2006
Messages
4,061
Location
Utah
This may be a simple "housekeeping" bill I object to the simple premise of granting government employees special privileges not granted to the citizenry.
I don't like special privileges for the government types either.

And I'm no expert. But I wonder if this isn't a bit like the way permit holders can buy a gun without the usual background check, or at least not paying for the background check.

Is this a special privilege? Or is a perfectly reasonably policy in light of the fact that permit holders are essentially background checked every day by the permit system?

I don't know how often cops get their backgrounds checked. I hope it is often enough that exempting them from the usual background check for purchase of a gun or obtaining a permit isn't so much a special privilege, as just a natural thing to do. And if they simply don't have to pay for the background check or to submit fingerprints to the FBI when they have already done so as part of their government job, I won't begrudge that. While cops are fairly well paid by several important metrics, at the end of the day, they are not overpaid for a lot of what they endure. To not charge them ~$35 for a redundant and unnecessary submission of fingerprints or $7.50 for a redundant background check to purchase isn't unreasonable.

Charles
 
Top