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Being Prepared

trooper46

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2010
Messages
150
Location
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This post is no way meant to rip on large people. I myself would have been considered a bigger fellow before I joined the army and cut down (damn MREs don't help though). Please read the whole post before you jump to that conclusion.

However, I've noticed after watching videos, reading posts, and even attending a few different 2nd amendment rallies. There is a large sector of the armed community that is...with lack of a better phrase......not entirely conditioned to help respond to an emergency or disaster.

So my question is: Do you think that part of being prepared (for an emergency, a shoot out, natural disaster, terrorist attack...etc) should also include maintaining at least a basic level of physical fitness? I'm not talking about being super man, just somewhat in shape.

My opinion: I find it somewhat hypocritical for someone (and I've sat politely and listened to this at an NRA event) for a person that is 5,9 and weighs about 300 pounds to discuss the importance of being prepared and having a survivalist mentality. Being prepared for an emergency goes way beyond just "carrying a gun" around. You may be needed to assist in evacuating someone wounded, you may need to take cover during a shoot out (which requires at least some agility), give CPR (alot of work if you have to do it until paramedics get there) etc. There are countless scenarios where not being massively obese or out of shape might come in handy.
Now I'm not saying we all need to be Jack Bauer or agent Gibbs....but I recommend at least trying to maintain a state of fitness and weight for both the sake of being prepared and your own health. I would suggest trying to achieve at least a passing score of the APFT. Which after a month or so of exercising 20 minutes a day is not too difficult, but it varies on your body type. This post obviously isn't directed at old timers or those with a specific illness.

As it applies to OC, I also think that people tend to be much less suspicious of someone who is physically fit and clean cut carrying a weapon than someone who is not. Maybe they just assume your a cop, I don't know. We can debate the morality of this, but it is none the less the reality of the situation. Bottom line, it makes OCing a little more hassle free until this country fixes itself. But that's a separate issue as it really shouldn't matter. This post is more about being prepared.

I would like to hear your input and discussion
 

grinner

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2010
Messages
101
Location
Pewaukee, WI
Yes, I agree. I was just thinking about this recently. I think your last paragraph about public perception of OC is a bit of a side-note (as you also pointed out). The main point about preparedness is well taken. Think of Will Smith in Legend. Freaking ripped.

I think being able to run a few miles, 20 push-ups, maybe 50 sit-ups, and a pull-up or 5 is all that's needed. General conditioning.

I'm sure opinions will vary widely on this topic and it should be interesting. Nice thread.
 

merc460

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Messages
229
Location
North Carolina, USA
I agree 100% and have been trying to do so. The first step I have taken..... I have been smoke free for 5 weeks now.
I have put on some weight over the last two years, and certainly cannot move (stretch) like I used to. To get back in shape, I intend to start slow by walking and then move up from there. I REALLY need to start stretching to get mobility back. Then I will work on some light strength training. Like you said, the basics.
 

Tomas

Regular Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2010
Messages
705
Location
University Place, Washington, USA
Hrmmmm... Up until the point I became a "Handicapped Individual" and spent three years fighting my way out of a wheelchair, I would have agreed, but at this point I have to say no.

One reason I carry is that I am NOT able to go hand-to-hand, two falls out of three, with any chance of winning against an average ten year old girl.

I'm one of those "exceptions" you always hear about, only to me it is not an exception, it is simply life as I know it.

:D
 

trooper46

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2010
Messages
150
Location
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I agree 100% and have been trying to do so. The first step I have taken..... I have been smoke free for 5 weeks now.
I have put on some weight over the last two years, and certainly cannot move (stretch) like I used to. To get back in shape, I intend to start slow by walking and then move up from there. I REALLY need to start stretching to get mobility back. Then I will work on some light strength training. Like you said, the basics.

Congratulations on 5 weeks no smoke. Keep it up! I've had a few friends quit smoking and I understand how difficult that can be. I used to smoke hookah (flavored tobacco ofcourse) twice a week. Now I'm down to about once a month and only on social occasions. I've found that it's always good to write down my goals to remind me hell or high water...thats whats going to happen.


I don't dispute that large folks can't defend themselves with a weapon, a side arm is the ultimate physical equilizer. The question is more towards those with the survivalist ideal and being a prepared member of society when others might need your help. It is true as VFORVENDETTA pointed out, fat is stored energy. However, there are a number of liabilities that also come along with in my opinion. For instance, should be you injured, additional effort and time would be required to evac you in an emergency that could be spent helping others. Also, in hand to hand combat, should you be surprised, you are also at somewhat of disadvantage to a physically fit attacker. Not to mention the numerous health issues that could cause to you be less self-reliant in the future.

But thats just my thought on it. Would like to hear more.
 

eye95

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 6, 2010
Messages
13,525
Location
Fairborn, Ohio, USA
Hrmmmm... Up until the point I became a "Handicapped Individual" and spent three years fighting my way out of a wheelchair, I would have agreed, but at this point I have to say no.

One reason I carry is that I am NOT able to go hand-to-hand, two falls out of three, with any chance of winning against an average ten year old girl.

I'm one of those "exceptions" you always hear about, only to me it is not an exception, it is simply life as I know it.

:D

I have always said that we are all responsible for using our God-given talents, whatever they are, to overcome our challenges, as best we can. For you, because of your challenges, preparedness includes your carrying a gun.

Oh...wait...you do.

Way to take responsibility!
 
M

McX

Guest
"You can run but you'll just die tired."


doug, best one liner uttered by you every, absolutely loved it. may i use it, one of the best ones ive ever heard.
 

Doug Huffman

Banned
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
9,181
Location
Washington Island, across Death's Door, Wisconsin,
It is not mine.

A neighbor MCPOCG (#5 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_Chief_Petty_Officer_of_the_Coast_Guard) tells it of his acquaintance, Carlos Hathcock. When he tells the story of White Feather's retirement, it makes me tear up. Hathcock had been on crutches for some time due to multiple sclerosis when he and my neighbor attended a parade in Hathcock's honor. My neighbor offered Hathcock his arm but was refused and Hathcock wobbled without his crutches throughout his parade. Carlos Hathcock changed the meaning of the 'white feather'.

Thinking about Carlos Hathcock just now I found this description of what the wannabes here call "situational awareness" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_(psychology) In my work we called Total Plant Awareness.
 
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irish52084

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2010
Messages
285
Location
Puyallup< WA
Physical fitness and looking fit are 2 different things. I know a lot of guys I train with who fall under the BMI(body mass index) as morbidly obese, but are in fantastic physical fighting shape. The idea that doing some sit-ups, pull ups and running a few miles a day will make you fit for a fight is ludicrous. If you want to be fit for a fight, you have to train to fight and if you want to be good at lifting weights and running you have to train to run and lift weights. I'm not saying that running and lifting are bad things, or they don't help in a fight situation, just saying they are a small part of it.

If anyone thinks looking like you're in really good shape means you have a huge advantage in a fight, look up Fedor Vladimirovich Emelianenko. He trains very hard, but looks pudgy and soft yet he was considered the best heavyweight fighter in the world from the early 2000's until less than a year ago.

I do agree that a level of fitness should me maintained by everyone if you are going to take responsibility for your own safety. It only makes sense, just be fit in a useful way.

[video=youtube;oDw3tUuoLpM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDw3tUuoLpM[/video]
 

LMTD

Accomplished Advocate
Joined
Apr 8, 2010
Messages
1,919
Location
, ,
I think the evaluation shifting to fighting abilities is a bit misguided.

For me, the reality of getting into shape regarding preparedness was simply the idea of having to walk carrying the bug out bag several miles to get to the first stage of the trip to the final location.

I am not on the EMP disaster bandwagon, I live in a metro area and there is several bridges and a river to cross and a simple earth quake could dramatically change my abilities to travel by truck or bike leaving me on foot. The bug out bag is not light and while our soldiers whom fight for our freedom may be able to hump 25 miles carrying a 70 pound pack, this old man is not going to make that trip without getting into a lot better shape.

I currently do 2 miles at a 3mph pace with 20 lbs of leg weights daily. I plan on getting to 5 miles at that pace weighted by years end, at that point I should be capable of the 20 miles with rest periods at a slower pace.

Each aspect of my prep plans explores the worst possible situation I can apply and the quake is about the worst for travel and the net result was that I simply could not achieve the goal if I did not make changes in my life style, there were no toys to buy that would get it done.
 

floyd patriot

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
22
Location
Floyd, Virginia, USA
Hrmmmm... Up until the point I became a "Handicapped Individual" and spent three years fighting my way out of a wheelchair, I would have agreed, but at this point I have to say no.

One reason I carry is that I am NOT able to go hand-to-hand, two falls out of three, with any chance of winning against an average ten year old girl.

I'm one of those "exceptions" you always hear about, only to me it is not an exception, it is simply life as I know it.

:D

I think I'll just go sit next to Mr. Tomas. I'm 58 years old and semi-crippled with osteoarthritis in my knees. I couldn't beat my way out of a kindergarten and I couldn't outrun a styrofoam cup in a light breeze. However(comma) I AM mentally fit. I have enough(just enough) brains to prepare for disasters, intruders, med emergencies, etc..
 
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