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Dont have a 1911 yet, but found the one I want..

.45acp

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2009
Messages
333
Location
Salt Lake City, UT
This is the 1911, I'm wanting to buy..... I have read the Kimbers have extractor problems, but have no experience with the Kimbers myself, but a friend of mine talks highly about the Kimbers

Kimber produced the Eclipse I and II a few years back. These guns had the external extractors and they did have some problems with FF and FE. Kimber dropped the external extractor guns.

. I don't keep up with all the Kimber models out but I don't think they are producing external exractor guns now.

My experiance with Kimber has been good, but there are some on the forum that have had issues with them.
 
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Melissa Maloney

New member
Joined
Aug 15, 2011
Messages
3
Location
Pennsylvania, United States
Armscorp 1911A1 (RIA/High STandard/Charles Daily(sp?)) are great deals

The Armscorp (Philippines and serviced in NV) 1911's are very nice. The 1911 forum has a section about them with glowing testimonials and customer service reports - also lifetime guarantee. I have the High Standard version of the Armscorp - much smaller tooling marks on slide than the Rock Island. For about $400 USGI --> $450 for Tactical extras, they are tough to beat.

After tossing the original mag for a SS Chip McCormick 8 rd mag - no problems ever. Feeds everything. No break in period. I do suggest taking a file and breaking all the sharp machine edges for CCW.

Being the piece is not as pricey, I don't treat it as a safe queen. It get lots of holster wear and I am not afraid to take it out in bad weather. About 1x a year I reblue the finish as the original dark grey parkerization quickly wore off the slide and parts of the frame.
 
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Grapeshot

Legendary Warrior
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
35,331
Location
Valhalla
The Armscorp (Philippines and serviced in NV) 1911's are very nice. The 1911 forum has a section about them with glowing testimonials and customer service reports - also lifetime guarantee. I have the High Standard version of the Armscorp - much smaller tooling marks on slide than the Rock Island. For about $400 USGI --> $450 for Tactical extras, they are tough to beat.

After tossing the original mag for a SS Chip McCormick 8 rd mag - no problems ever. Feeds everything. No break in period. I do suggest taking a file and breaking all the sharp machine edges for CCW.

Being the piece is not as pricey, I don't treat it as a safe queen. It get lots of holster wear and I am not afraid to take it out in bad weather. About 1x a year I reblue the finish as the original dark grey parkerization quickly wore off the slide and parts of the frame.

Please tell me you did not use a file to dehorn/melt your handgun. :eek:
 

cbpeck

Regular Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
406
Location
Pasco, Washington, USA
I agree with the poster who advised against dropping that much money on a 1911 until you have spent ample time with the design. I would even suggest purchasing a cheaper 1911 first, especially since you don't have the money for the Wilson right now, and using it for a few seasons. You can always sell the gun for close to what you have in it (maybe more if you get a good deal) and reinvest that money into your dream 1911, which, btw, may be different by then. Experience does tend to evolve our preferences.

Kimber has made a lot of guns over the years... I think it would be conservative to say that 95% of them consistently perform flawlessly. Were there a few bad ones with issues? Sure, but you'd be hard pressed to find any maker, even the custom ones, who didn't have a hiccup at some point. And there's no doubt that if one did have a problem, Kimber CS would make it right.

I've had my Kimber Custom CDP II for 4 years, and it has been perfect the whole time. I'd trust my life to it without a second thought.
 

Melissa Maloney

New member
Joined
Aug 15, 2011
Messages
3
Location
Pennsylvania, United States
Please tell me you did not use a file to dehorn/melt your handgun. :eek:

Sorry, I mistakenly assumed it was common parlance. "Breaking edges" is commonly used when working with machined parts. After machining, parts may have extremely sharp edges. For items meant to be handled with bare hands, the machined edges/knurling are broken/filed/rounded for comfort. My 1911 external surfaces have broken edges to be more comfortable for me, less wear on holsters, and less snags on clothing for CCW.

So what is "dehorn/melt"? I doubt you mean grind or change the metal temper with heat.
 

WalkingWolf

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,925
Location
North Carolina
I agree with the poster who advised against dropping that much money on a 1911 until you have spent ample time with the design. I would even suggest purchasing a cheaper 1911 first, especially since you don't have the money for the Wilson right now, and using it for a few seasons. You can always sell the gun for close to what you have in it (maybe more if you get a good deal) and reinvest that money into your dream 1911, which, btw, may be different by then. Experience does tend to evolve our preferences.

Kimber has made a lot of guns over the years... I think it would be conservative to say that 95% of them consistently perform flawlessly. Were there a few bad ones with issues? Sure, but you'd be hard pressed to find any maker, even the custom ones, who didn't have a hiccup at some point. And there's no doubt that if one did have a problem, Kimber CS would make it right.

I've had my Kimber Custom CDP II for 4 years, and it has been perfect the whole time. I'd trust my life to it without a second thought.

That is why I suggested the Argentine military surplus, a person cannot go wrong with one of these colts and they are colts, not clones. Even the the Ballester Molina model is a superb weapon. These are tried and true weapons that have been in service and function with ball ammo superbly. With probably no more than a $100 they can be turned into superstar weapons for under $400.

As a civilian we always have to keep in mind that if we should ever have to use our sidearm we may lose that sidearm until the shooting is cleared. I would cringe at the thought of a $1200 firearm sitting uncleaned in a police storage locker. Not to mention that firearms are marked for chain of evidence just in case of charges. This mark is usually a scratched mark in a unseen location on the weapon.

If the OP has the dough for the latest 1911 by all means go for it. But nobody has ever lost money on one of these surplus colts that I know of. I always got double for mine, that is the only reason I sold them.
 

Grapeshot

Legendary Warrior
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
35,331
Location
Valhalla
Sorry, I mistakenly assumed it was common parlance. "Breaking edges" is commonly used when working with machined parts. After machining, parts may have extremely sharp edges. For items meant to be handled with bare hands, the machined edges/knurling are broken/filed/rounded for comfort. My 1911 external surfaces have broken edges to be more comfortable for me, less wear on holsters, and less snags on clothing for CCW.

So what is "dehorn/melt"? I doubt you mean grind or change the metal temper with heat.

"Melting" is a term used by many manufactures and gunsmiths wherein the sharp angles and edges on the exterior of the slide and frame are well rounded - no heat is used. It is either an original production design or if done to an existing gun will require reblueing /refinishing.
Look at the pictures in the following link and you will see what is meant by "melting."
http://www.clarkcustomguns.com/meltdown.htm

"Dehorning" is a light and gentler easing of sharp surfaces - not nearly so pronounced as "melting" and that would seem to be what you accomplished.
 

WalkingWolf

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,925
Location
North Carolina
"Melting" is a term used by many manufactures and gunsmiths wherein the sharp angles and edges on the exterior of the slide and frame are well rounded - no heat is used. It is either an original production design or if done to an existing gun will require reblueing /refinishing.
Look at the pictures in the following link and you will see what is meant by "melting."
http://www.clarkcustomguns.com/meltdown.htm

"Dehorning" is a light and gentler easing of sharp surfaces - not nearly so pronounced as "melting" and that would seem to be what you accomplished.

LOL, us old timers call that a gun that has been broken in, like a favorite pair of boots. Never thought of doing it with files. J/K
 

Melissa Maloney

New member
Joined
Aug 15, 2011
Messages
3
Location
Pennsylvania, United States
Please tell me you did not use a file to dehorn/melt your handgun.



Yep, I "dehorned" the piece.

What is wrong with using a file? [I didn't say rasp:)] I will post a few pics to alleviate your concerns about using a file to dehone/break machined edges. (I have at least 80 files to choose from for projects.)

I did a few other interesting things other 1911 owners could do at home to make it more reliable/comfortable. I'll try to post pics.
UPDATE: A Google search showed that many others have done what I already did. The exception is I narrowed the grips a bit and added a groove for my thumb to easily find the mag release w/o having to release my grip on the pistol. Pic to follow.
 
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Grapeshot

Legendary Warrior
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
35,331
Location
Valhalla
Please tell me you did not use a file to dehorn/melt your handgun.



Yep, I "dehorned" the piece.

What is wrong with using a file? [I didn't say rasp:)] I will post a few pics to alleviate your concerns about using a file to dehone/break machined edges. (I have at least 80 files to choose from for projects.)

I did a few other interesting things other 1911 owners could do at home to make it more reliable/comfortable. I'll try to post pics.

Admit I was visualizing a hand tool not unlike a wood rasp attacking the form and beauty of a helpless handgun - not the properly selected tool used judiciously. My bad.:uhoh:
 

Gunslinger

Regular Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
3,854
Location
Free, Colorado, USA
This is the 1911, I'm wanting to buy..... I have read the Kimbers have extractor problems, but have no experience with the Kimbers myself, but a friend of mine talks highly about the Kimbers....but I like the look of the Wilson and have read they function flawlessly, trying to find a shop that has one I can actually hold, but the two dealers close to me,special order them, when they do get one in, its out the door or sold before they even get it in....
http://www.wilsoncombat.com/p_cqb.htm

I prefer Nighthawks over Wilsons, but that is a matter of taste. Both are excellent pistols, but don't overlook Les Baer. He has the same high quality as the other two--or Ed Brown for that matter, but costs hundreds less. I have two SIG 1911s, thousand dollar guns that are capable of much higher accuracy than I am. While I would love to own a Nighthawk Talon II, I can't justify the price. Kimber's quality has been up and down; SIG has the best CS there is; Wesson's Valor is a fine 1911; SA's TRP is highly thought of; the new E S&W has received rave reviews. My point: lots of very good to excellent guns out there from $1000 to $4000. Have fun deciding! BTW, I like the Blade-tech for my 5" SIG; Fobus for my Commander length.
 

Gunslinger

Regular Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
3,854
Location
Free, Colorado, USA
Spend the extra money and get some Wilson Combat magazines. I am using them in my Taurus and they work wonderfully!

Chip McCormack mags are also excellent for 1911s. Use them in my SIG C3. Taurus used to have ridicules CS, but now turn warranty work around in 3 weeks to the day. Had to send my 24/7OSS to them for a major problem--decocking let the firing pin indent the primer. They had FedX pick it up at my house and I had it back in 3 weeks to the day. Not as good as SIG CS, but a big improvement. Their quality in revolvers is first rate; pistols, not so much, but they stand behind them and you have to look at the price.
 

Gunslinger

Regular Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
3,854
Location
Free, Colorado, USA
Sorry, I mistakenly assumed it was common parlance. "Breaking edges" is commonly used when working with machined parts. After machining, parts may have extremely sharp edges. For items meant to be handled with bare hands, the machined edges/knurling are broken/filed/rounded for comfort. My 1911 external surfaces have broken edges to be more comfortable for me, less wear on holsters, and less snags on clothing for CCW.

So what is "dehorn/melt"? I doubt you mean grind or change the metal temper with heat.

Melt is a factory machining term to round off or "break" sharper edges. Dehorn can be done by a good Gunsmith on a built pistol. The key is the factory finishes the gun after the melt machining; the GS has to refinish it. Does make for a nicer carry weapon. NOT a DIY project!!!! Unless you have the right skills which I certainly do not.
 
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CSINEV

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
33
Location
North Las Vegas
I own a Colt 1911 Series 70 .45 I bought it used for $500.00 in 1995 to date it is hands down the best semi-auto I have ever owned.
 

DangerClose

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2011
Messages
570
Location
The mean streets of WI
I know alot of people do not like Taurus firearms but they make a very nice 1911, depending on model between $600 and $800.
My relative has a Taurus 1911. Was $470 shipped a few months ago. He loves it. Couldn't believe the accuracy. I've shot it, and I don't know what anyone could say bad about it other than ho-hum grips.
Kimber has made a lot of guns over the years... I think it would be conservative to say that 95% of them consistently perform flawlessly. Were there a few bad ones with issues? Sure, but you'd be hard pressed to find any maker, even the custom ones, who didn't have a hiccup at some point. And there's no doubt that if one did have a problem, Kimber CS would make it right.
Seems like whenever I hear a Kimber owner saying his gun has a problem, suddenly a bunch more come out of the woodwork to say the same. Anywho, speaking of Kimber...
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2011/02/07/2039969/costly-ale-guns-fail-get-traded.html
RALEIGH Little more than a year after buying 150 collector-grade handguns, officials at the N.C. Division of Alcohol Law Enforcement say the $1,055 pistols were so unreliable they had to get rid of them.

ALE director John Ledford said the Kimber pistols repeatedly suffered such problems as rounds jamming during training exercises, broken sights and the weapon's safety button sometimes falling off.

What do you expect for a measly $1050, though.
 

Wetworx

Regular Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Messages
31
Location
Florida
I prefer Nighthawks over Wilsons, but that is a matter of taste. Both are excellent pistols, but don't overlook Les Baer. He has the same high quality as the other two--or Ed Brown for that matter, but costs hundreds less. I have two SIG 1911s, thousand dollar guns that are capable of much higher accuracy than I am. While I would love to own a Nighthawk Talon II, I can't justify the price. Kimber's quality has been up and down; SIG has the best CS there is; Wesson's Valor is a fine 1911; SA's TRP is highly thought of; the new E S&W has received rave reviews. My point: lots of very good to excellent guns out there from $1000 to $4000. Have fun deciding! BTW, I like the Blade-tech for my 5" SIG; Fobus for my Commander length.

I have a Les Baer Thunder Ranch Special and am not 100% pleased with it. The lockup on it is too tight between the barrel and the barrel bushing. I have put probably 600 rounds through it and it hasn't loosened up at all. I called up Les Baer and got an attitude from them about it. They said they could shave some off of the bushing, but I was going to have to pay for shipping. It's an accurate gun, but for the $1600 or so that I paid for it a while ago, I expected better service and certainly no attitude from them. They apparently think their "shite" doesn't stink. I've moved on to a Springfield TRP and then a Wilson CQB Elite and haven't looked back. The Les Bare has been relegated to storage.
 

WalkingWolf

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,925
Location
North Carolina
I have a Les Baer Thunder Ranch Special and am not 100% pleased with it. The lockup on it is too tight between the barrel and the barrel bushing. I have put probably 600 rounds through it and it hasn't loosened up at all. I called up Les Baer and got an attitude from them about it. They said they could shave some off of the bushing, but I was going to have to pay for shipping. It's an accurate gun, but for the $1600 or so that I paid for it a while ago, I expected better service and certainly no attitude from them. They apparently think their "shite" doesn't stink. I've moved on to a Springfield TRP and then a Wilson CQB Elite and haven't looked back. The Les Bare has been relegated to storage.

This is an easy fix, the bushings are tight intentionally for accuracy. You have two options that would be quicker and easier than shipping. Use a dremel to polish the inside of the bushing, or go to your local auto store and buy a tube of lapping compound, apply a small amount and work the busing on the barrel. If the bushing is to tight in the slide buy a $5 bushing tool. A 1911 is like a Harley, you either pay someone to tinker, or you learn to tinker yourself. That is one reason I like surplus 1911's, they have already been broken in, and they cost much less.
 
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Grapeshot

Legendary Warrior
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
35,331
Location
Valhalla
I have a Les Baer Thunder Ranch Special and am not 100% pleased with it. The lockup on it is too tight between the barrel and the barrel bushing. I have put probably 600 rounds through it and it hasn't loosened up at all. I called up Les Baer and got an attitude from them about it. They said they could shave some off of the bushing, but I was going to have to pay for shipping. It's an accurate gun, but for the $1600 or so that I paid for it a while ago, I expected better service and certainly no attitude from them. They apparently think their "shite" doesn't stink. I've moved on to a Springfield TRP and then a Wilson CQB Elite and haven't looked back. The Les Bare has been relegated to storage.

You are complaining about a gun that is functioning as designed - no failure to feed, no jambs, no malfunction at all. Oh you have to use a bushing wrench...sorry 'bout that, but that is a personal preference not a fault/failure.

Had mine about 5 years - it has never gagged - still requires a bushing wrench. Sweet shooting gun. Functions like it was on precision ball bearings.
 

WalkingWolf

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,925
Location
North Carolina
You are complaining about a gun that is functioning as designed - no failure to feed, no jambs, no malfunction at all. Oh you have to use a bushing wrench...sorry 'bout that, but that is a personal preference not a fault/failure.

Had mine about 5 years - it has never gagged - still requires a bushing wrench. Sweet shooting gun. Functions like it was on precision ball bearings.

I was not sure of the complaint~~but suspected it was a tight bushing to frame fit. I have not seen to many problems with bushing to barrel being to tight. But that is fixed easily.
 
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