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Had no idea Costco is ant-firearm

color of law

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...

344 citizens killed by LEs since 1 Jan 18 to date (33 more to date compared to 2017)

987 citizens killed by LEs 2017.

963 citizens killed by LEs 2016.

995 citizens killed by LEs 2015.

......
The secrete footnote says any number below 1,000 is considered in the acceptable norm.
 

color of law

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This term of art "for most intelligent Americans" all depends on where you set the bar or norm. Since normal reading comprehension is set at a forth grade level, it would seem that what "most intelligent Americans" level would be somewhat low.
 

HP995

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depends on where you set the bar or norm
True.

normal reading comprehension is set at a forth grade level
That's going at it backwards. First task is to successfully parse English syntax!

If you see "most black Americans..." be aware that doesn't mean most Americans are black. See how those are different? Word order is important, and so are the parts of the sentence.

Solus built an entire (and of course, lengthy) post around the grammatically-challenged distraction that "most intelligent Americans" means "most Americans are intelligent." I'll say this - he did start his post off accurately, though!

Back to the issue, controversy over the facts of a situation is all too common. A man was shot down, and (according to the golden rule) we should extent to him and his family the same fair, accurate, and respectful consideration of the facts that we would want for ourselves.
 

solus

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True.



That's going at it backwards. First task is to successfully parse English syntax!

If you see "most black Americans..." be aware that doesn't mean most Americans are black. See how those are different? Word order is important, and so are the parts of the sentence.

Solus built an entire (and of course, lengthy) post around the grammatically-challenged distraction that "most intelligent Americans" means "most Americans are intelligent." I'll say this - he did start his post off accurately, though!

Back to the issue, controversy over the facts of a situation is all too common. A man was shot down, and (according to the golden rule) we should extent to him and his family the same fair, accurate, and respectful consideration of the facts that we would want for ourselves.
HP, is obvious you did not read KBCraig’s cite initially biased article pointing out numerous egregious LE biases instead of presenting objective evidence, and if you had read the rest of the parts ended in part six which discusses conspiracy theories ~ for what purpose and to what end? Surely such caustic hyperbole does not mitigate a bloody thing for the family to grieve and achieve closure!

Urban myths start, in some cases from real event(s) then the true story goes awry due to hearsay and the myths begin and continue growing.

As for your belief I require grammar lessons regarding syntax on prepositional phrases is ludicrous, especially since in your example above, most - many or much; black is an adjective = modify a noun; American = noun. Referring to a specifically ethnicity in this country.

Your previous prepositional phrase, most intelligent Americans, Is an oxymoron as proven with our nation’s educational system so my commentary was an attempt to qualifying which Americans you consider are mostly intelligent?

so the part where I stated “you were right” impressed you, :eek: guess I need to check my syntax :cool:.
 

HP995

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grammar lessons
Glad to help! Remember, word order and position are important. Changing the verb can make a difference too.

an attempt to qualifying which Americans you consider are mostly intelligent?
You're getting closer, but still choking on syntax. Pay attention to your "mostly" and what it modifies, and my "most" and its function. Not which Americans are mostly intelligent, but whether intelligent Americans are mostly familiar with the golden rule.

Surely such caustic hyperbole does not mitigate a bloody thing for the family to grieve and achieve closure!
Huh? Conflating theories in blogs with the basic controversy itself, and then involving the family?

In their own words:

Bill Scott said they didn’t drop the case because they didn’t believe in it.

"I believe, as do many, that Erik was murdered, crime scene corrupted, critical evidence destroyed," he said.

LEGAL BARRIERS

Scott family attorney Ross Goodman said the decision came down to what was one of the most controversial aspects of the case: the lack of surveillance video of the incident.

Goodman said that without the video, he didn’t feel he could overcome a qualified immunity defense for police officers, which the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals recently has bolstered.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime...amily-drops-lawsuit-against-las-vegas-police/
 
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OC for ME

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White Oak Plantation
~90% of folks over 50 years of age (75 million Boomers) know that three feet are in a yard. ~20% of millennials (83 million) do not know this. So, based on this, ~7 million Boomers and ~66 million millennials are not intelligent. Works out to be about 34% of ~212 million Americans, not counting the other age demographics, are idiots and have not a clue what the golden rule is.
 

HP995

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MO, USA
That's pretty good. Between those who don't know yards, those who can't parse sentences, the ones who march and clamor for their rights to be taken away, and many others with deficits around us - yeah, I'd say the numbers are even worse!

But to return to, um, intelligent discourse on the topic, I don't see indications that "closure" is the main issue for the family. Erik Scott's father hasn't dropped the issue of his son's death. He even wrote a novel about it! "Fictionalized" but "based on actual events associated with the murder of his eldest son, Erik."

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/266906

I read some of it. There was humor in the names, for example the Costco store became "Ho's Warehouse Club" (!) but the pain really shows through as he goes through the events leading up to his son's death and the type of coverup he suspects, including the lack of security video.
 

solus

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snipp...

But to return to, um, intelligent discourse on the topic, I don't see indications that "closure" is the main issue for the family. Erik Scott's father hasn't dropped the issue of his son's death. He even wrote a novel about it! "Fictionalized" but "based on actual events associated with the murder of his eldest son, Erik."

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/266906

I read some of it. There was humor in the names, for example the Costco store became "Ho's Warehouse Club" (!) but the pain really shows through as he goes through the events leading up to his son's death and the type of coverup he suspects, including the lack of security video.
Apparently HP you did not read the cite you previously provided: https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime/...-vegas-police/


"They (Scott’s family) kept telling people they had a case and they were never going to let it go," Collins said. "They let it go. … Someone convinced them otherwise."

"We believe had the Costco video existed..."

"The Scott family agreed to drop the lawsuit if police did not pursue legal fees."

"(Sheriff)...controversy over the Scott shooting was an example of people jumping to conclusions."

"When Scott refused to leave, employees called police..."

"An employee pointed out Scott to police, and the officers gave him commands to either get down or drop the weapon..."

"Scott pulled the holstered weapon out of his waistband and turned around. Officers fired seven times, striking him seven times."

"There were dozens of witnesses, many of them doctors and lawyers, and in the days that followed, some of them doubted whether Scott pulled out a gun. Others said they did see him pull out a gun.

"Scott’s family led an aggressive campaign to bring the case to light, paying for billboard advertisements, hosting vigils and casting doubt about the police investigation."

"Scott, it was later found, had potentially fatal levels of the painkiller morphine and the anti-anxiety drug Xanax in his system. He was acting strangely inside the store. And he was carrying two guns — the second was found as paramedics took him to the hospital."

oh, HP, ya might validate your cite of the father's book, especially since it comes up under the title of THE PERMIT and the synopses state:

When Las Vegas cops gun down a covert federal agent, they become targets for Checkmate, a black ops team of assassins charged with neutralizing terrorists. Checkmate's deadly message to outlaw killer-cops is: "You kill, you lie, you die.

That the decedent's father decided to make money off the tragic death of his offspring is despicable let alone fictionalizing and elevating his drugged up son as a covert federal agent!

ya, urban myth of he said and she said...especially since the father is exacerbating the myth by publishing a book of fiction about it.

thanks a bunch HP for unequivocally proving my point of urban myths sometimes begin with real events.
 

HP995

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(verbal sewage)
The problem with someone "having the runs" verbally, so to speak, is the output is high in volume, low in quality, careless on facts, messy. So many flaws no one wants to waste time playing janitor. I don't want to waste my time either, and I hate internal bickering among 2A/OC. We should stand united. But when I see anyone mindlessly running people down, I have to say something. I hate to see you wasting your own potential too.

Apparently HP you did not read the cite you previously provided
Bizarre claim. Projection? I don't post a lot, I don't cite a lot, so I don't have that problem. From the heavily bolded quotes it looks like you've cherry picked one side of a pretty well-balanced article. Remember, this was a legal situation with claims from each side. You presenting one side uncritically, without proof and perhaps without much detailed reading of the controversy, is doing what you accused others of all throughout this thread - spreading urban myths! Projection again?

There is no need to post the entire article here - anyone can read the whole thing via the link without it being filtered or marred with added emphasis on every line. Here's one quote:

In the months that followed, the Scott case would help prompt changes to the coroner’s inquest process and launch a yearlong Review-Journal investigation into officer-involved shootings.

The investigation found that Las Vegas police officers have more shootings than officers at many other jurisdictions and that the agency did little to learn from the incidents.
First you wanted the family to have closure and criticized conspiracies, now after I proved the family's main concern was not closure, you switch to attacking the father. Yes, I notice when you change positions. I've already posted the quote of why the family dropped the lawsuit. I've said the facts were contested, as (unfortunately) they are bound to be in a case like this. The book info is easy for you to find after following my link - that's the whole point.

I don't think that was the end of LV police scandals, either. Not my job to advocate this, but it's an important subject for public safety and 2A rights, and should be approached intelligently and fairly. That's why I pointed out the golden rule and wondered how it would be if you were in their shoes. There's a lot of info if you take time to really read and understand.
 

solus

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Ya know, I could jump up and down in a puddle of water and still be accused of stirring up dust!
 
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since9

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Jan 14, 2010
Messages
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Location
Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
Just experienced today that apparently Cosco is anti-firearm. For years I’ve always shopped there and carried. Never had an issue with management and somehow I wasn’t aware of this policy. Closed my account today with them and they asked me to reconsider. Told them I already did and feel it’s my American duty to take my money else where.
Good for you!

No greater feedback hath a man for his vendor than the cessation of his vendor's income. Of course, coupling that with a letter to corporate CC to the local manager carries more impact, as it's highly doubtful the local manager will ever pass your reason as to why you left to his own boss.

I encourage you to write that letter!

Speaking of which, I have my own letter to write...
 
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