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Gun Question at doctors office?

mechanicworkman

Regular Member
Joined
May 30, 2011
Messages
200
Location
St. Louis
Just too the child down to doctors office for physical. Part of this process their questions included asking if their were Guns in the home! Is this legal? Seems like I heard stuff a while back about this. Can anyone elaborate?


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WalkingWolf

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Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,912
Location
North Carolina
Just too the child down to doctors office for physical. Part of this process their questions included asking if their were Guns in the home! Is this legal? Seems like I heard stuff a while back about this. Can anyone elaborate?


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Just answer no, if you leave it blank they will put it with the yes data. It is none of their business.
 

mechanicworkman

Regular Member
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May 30, 2011
Messages
200
Location
St. Louis
Wasn't there a bill that came across a while back that didn't allow them to ask this? Or mabe it failed.


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solus

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Aug 22, 2013
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here nc
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/state/florida/article29245474.html

from july 15, quote: For the second time in little more than a year, a federal appeals court Tuesday upheld a controversial Florida law that restricts doctors from asking questions and recording information about patients’ gun ownership. unquote

that stated, the American Academy of Pediatrics and seven other health professional organizations and the American Bar Association have released a call for action to reduce firearm-related injury and death in the United States, according to a statement published online February 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

one of the tenants in their statement:
quote:
The organizations represented in the statement oppose state and federal mandates interfering with physician free speech and the patient–physician relationship, such as laws preventing physicians from discussing a patient's gun ownership. unquote.
Retrieved 8 March 2016 from Medscap article dtd: 23 Feb 15; titled: Medical Societies Call for Reducing Gun-Related Injury, Death; written by: Laurie Barclay, MD.

might write a letter pointing out to your personal physican's office manager they are in violation of the FL Law!!

please understand the consequence of writing a letter...you MIGHT (read as probably) be seeking another health care provider.

ipse
 
Last edited:

F350

Regular Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2012
Messages
942
Location
The High Plains of Wyoming
In honor of Nancy Reagan....

Just say NO!

Heck I lie on those questionnaires all the time, like I have never used alcohol, I have never used tobacco, I have never engaged in promiscuous sex (I AM honest on the **** thing though :D )
 

utbagpiper

Banned
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Jul 5, 2006
Messages
4,061
Location
Utah
I don't suggest lying about anything that might actually affect your diagnosis or care. In fact, one item often forgotten that can be important if you are facing an unexplained illness is what foreign travel you've done in the last couple of years, or ever, depending on the symptoms. As one example, I believe US blood banks still impose a lifetime ban on donations from anyone who has lived in the UK for more than some number of months due to the increased risk (still small total risk, but statistically significant increased risk) of contracting mad cow disease.

Do bear in mind the evolving and complicated relationship that exists between doctors/nurses and patients. The days of having strict doctor-patient confidentiality and the doctor working strictly for the patient are coming to an end. And this is when you, the adult are the patient. Things get very sticky when the patient is your minor child.

In (many) States health care providers are legally required to report to authorities any suspicion of child abuse or neglect, including medical neglect. The latter can include not following doctors' medical recommendations for treatment as happened some 13 years ago in Utah with a then 12 year old boy named Parker Jensen. (Your favorite internet search engine will turn up several news stories in addition to the one I linked to.)

While a mostly healthy adult can probably just avoid having a relationship with a doctor if he chooses, parents probably need to have a decent working relationship with a pediatrician. Kids get sick and the ER is really expensive. Kids will need a physical for many school or other activities. Most schools (public and private) require vaccinations. A good working relationship with the pediatrician can make it very easy to get what some might consider to be a less risky schedule than the standard. And if a kid ever does end up in an ER with an innocent injury that could also have been caused by abuse or any form of neglect is ever accused (ie an uptight neighbor seeing a free-range parenting style next door), a good relationship with a pediatrician can provide useful evidence in your favor.

In my opinion, doctors should no more be asking about firearms in homes than they would ask about a family's religious affiliation or devotion. I can imagine rare cases where it might make sense to ask such questions, but that information should not be sought routinely.

That said, I'm way less interested in "educating" or converting my child's pediatrician or other doctor to my view on guns than I am in making sure my child receives the care he needs when he needs it, while also working to protect my child, my family's privacy, and my parental rights from the risk of overly-intrusive government power.

Charles
 

WalkingWolf

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Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,912
Location
North Carolina

color of law

Accomplished Advocate
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
5,724
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCOD...6A-subchapXXV-partA-subpartii-sec300gg-17.pdf

(c) Protection of Second Amendment gun rights
(1) Wellness and prevention programs
A wellness and health promotion activity implemented under subsection (a)(1)(D) may not require the disclosure or collection of any information relating to—
(A) the presence or storage of a lawfully-possessed firearm or ammunition in the residence or on the property of an individual; or
(B) the lawful use, possession, or storage of a firearm or ammunition by an individual.
(2) Limitation on data collection
None of the authorities provided to the Secretary under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or an amendment made by that Act shall be construed to authorize or may be used for the collection of any information relating to—
(A) the lawful ownership or possession of a firearm or ammunition;
(B) the lawful use of a firearm or ammunition; or
(C) the lawful storage of a firearm or ammunition.
(3) Limitation on databases or data banks
None of the authorities provided to the Secretary under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or an amendment made by that Act shall be construed to authorize or may be used to maintain records of individual ownership or possession of a firearm or ammunition.
(4) Limitation on determination of premium rates or eligibility for health insurance
A premium rate may not be increased, health insurance coverage may not be denied, and a discount, rebate, or reward offered for participation in a wellness program may not be reduced or withheld under any health benefit plan issued pursuant to or in accordance with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or an amendment made by that Act on the basis of, or on reliance upon—
(A) the lawful ownership or possession of a firearm or ammunition; or
(B) the lawful use or storage of a firearm or ammunition.
(5) Limitation on data collection requirements for individuals
No individual shall be required to disclose any information under any data collection activity authorized under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or an amendment made by that Act relating to—
(A) the lawful ownership or possession of a firearm or ammunition; or
(B) the lawful use, possession, or storage of a firearm or ammunition.

Doc, don't even think of asking about firearms......
 

MAC702

Campaign Veteran
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
6,337
Location
Nevada
Does the same form ask about the presence of a swimming pool? Cleaning chemicals? Motor vehicles? If no, there is a clear agenda that has nothing to do with "safety."
 

OC for ME

Regular Member
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Jan 6, 2010
Messages
12,453
Location
White Oak Plantation
No state law can compel a doctor to ask (RSMo 571.012. 1.), and no doctor is prohibited by law from asking (RSMo 571.012. 3.). There is a vague reference to RSMo 632 in RSMo 571.012. 3.
 

davidmcbeth

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Jan 14, 2012
Messages
16,169
Location
earth's crust
Just too the child down to doctors office for physical. Part of this process their questions included asking if their were Guns in the home! Is this legal? Seems like I heard stuff a while back about this. Can anyone elaborate?


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Go find a new doctor. Simple.

So you heard this stuff before and were surprised?

Hmmmm.
 

Citizen

Founder's Club Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2006
Messages
18,276
Location
Fairfax Co., VA
Does the same form ask about the presence of a swimming pool? Cleaning chemicals? Motor vehicles? If no, there is a clear agenda that has nothing to do with "safety."

+1

Also, the unused alternative helps tell the tale. The medical community could launch a national gun safety training campaign for kids. You don't need to ask invasive questions of parents in order to print up gun safety brochures for the pediatrician waiting room. If they can't afford to print them, they could ask the NRA for freebies.
 

DWCook

Activist Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Messages
432
Location
Lenexa, Kansas
My honest opinion is it's none of their concern if there is or isn't firearms in the house hold. Some of the questions asked on these forms are I feel slipped in so information can be found through other means. I can see the good and bad about that particular question. But I've told my buddies to just answer no on that question considering it's none of their business since it's not a "medical" question. Also why do they need to know this information when it's just a simple medical checkup that's not anything related to firearms?
 

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
9,174
Location
here nc
My honest opinion is it's none of their concern if there is or isn't firearms in the house hold. Some of the questions asked on these forms are I feel slipped in so information can be found through other means. I can see the good and bad about that particular question. But I've told my buddies to just answer no on that question considering it's none of their business since it's not a "medical" question. Also why do they need to know this information when it's just a simple medical checkup that's not anything related to firearms?

why am i concerned your buddies are asking you how to fill out their medical forms, let alone you are responding and advising them to the point they listen...

ipse
 

Maverick9

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Joined
Apr 7, 2013
Messages
1,404
Location
Mid-atlantic
"Well we had a Bofors 37 mm anti-tank gun, but my wife wanted to trade up to a howitzer, or a 12 inch coastal defense mortar..."
 
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