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Poll: Overwhelming Majority of Military Want Concealed Carry Rights on Home Bases

PerBast

Regular Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2016
Messages
44
Location
Ft. Jackson, South Carolina
Military service members qualifying

I have to agree with those who have stated that although an individual is in the military, it does not ensure they are anywhere safe when handling and firing a weapon. With 34 years in the service, 18 of that active duty I bet I have only been on a qualification range 60 times. Walk up to the line, shoot a paper target that does not poses a threat to me, thus very little stress on my ability to shoot.

Thankfully since purchasing a handgun, I have gone to the range at least 10 times just since Dec 2015. I still have so much to learn to even be somewhat safe with a loaded gun. Hopefully over the next few months and lots of help from others I can mature into a safe gun owner. And hopefully never run into an instance where I ever have to use my handgun.

Michael
 

Grapeshot

Legendary Warrior
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
35,331
Location
Valhalla
I have to agree with those who have stated that although an individual is in the military, it does not ensure they are anywhere safe when handling and firing a weapon. With 34 years in the service, 18 of that active duty I bet I have only been on a qualification range 60 times. Walk up to the line, shoot a paper target that does not poses a threat to me, thus very little stress on my ability to shoot.

Thankfully since purchasing a handgun, I have gone to the range at least 10 times just since Dec 2015. I still have so much to learn to even be somewhat safe with a loaded gun. Hopefully over the next few months and lots of help from others I can mature into a safe gun owner. And hopefully never run into an instance where I ever have to use my handgun.

Michael
Don't sell yourself short, no need to be overly critical. Nonetheless, you have a good plan.
 

utbagpiper

Banned
Joined
Jul 5, 2006
Messages
4,061
Location
Utah
I support permit free, constitutional carry. So I can't much support an argument that military members are not "qualified" to carry guns for self defense. Are they any less qualified than a member of the general populace?

What I can support is the need for good order and discipline in the military. The military is not just another job and the chain of command is not just another boss. So I'm open to the notion that junior enlisted might be disarmed while on duty. Off duty, their RKBA should be respected like everyone else's; and like everyone else, held to account for criminal conduct involving firearms. It might behoove the military to provide a little more training on handguns so their personnel can defend themselves.

But if senior enlisted and officers (at least) can't be trusted with personal or even officially issued side arms to defend themselves and their subordinates while on duty, then it is probably time to rethink letting them handle lots of other stuff.
 

OC for ME

Regular Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2010
Messages
12,398
Location
White Oak Plantation
Junior members, enlisted and officer, may be off-duty and reside on base. Officers not as likely due to the pay officer/enlisted differential. Off-duty is not the same as off-post/base.

Back in the day I had to put a chit in to live off-base. Liberty is a navy term for not on-duty...not on-duty I was on liberty.
 

ron73440

Regular Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
471
Location
Suffolk VA
How is this different then anyone else carrying?

I trust if a person is incompetent, then they won't carry. It should be their responsibility to decide for themselves.

Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk
 

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
8,718
Location
here nc
How is this different then anyone else carrying?

I trust if a person is incompetent, then they won't carry. It should be their responsibility to decide for themselves.

Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk
recently in smithfield, ex service member on multiple psychometric meds, got arrested for impersonating a LE...after sentencing and before incarceration, showed up in a pharmacy in look alike LE clothing, w/badge, and firearm ...

just saying some folk don't know they are incompetent...

ipse
 

ron73440

Regular Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
471
Location
Suffolk VA
I'm not seeing a difference between this and anyother criminal activity.

I also don't agree yhat freedom should be restricted based on a few dumbasses.

Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk
 

utbagpiper

Banned
Joined
Jul 5, 2006
Messages
4,061
Location
Utah
Junior members, enlisted and officer, may be off-duty and reside on base. Officers not as likely due to the pay officer/enlisted differential. Off-duty is not the same as off-post/base.
As I posted, "Off duty, their RKBA should be respected like everyone else's; and like everyone else, held to account for criminal conduct involving firearms."

Clearly this is directed at those living on base as those living off base would be able to KBA in their private homes on the same terms as non-military living in the same city and State.
 

since9

Campaign Veteran
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
6,964
Location
Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
Which of that is from a source, and which is your own conclusion? Because my assumption is something is not right there. Most stats like that would have me believe that the 23 that ended in 2 minutes or less are part of the 44 that ended in 5 minutes or less.
Yeah, I goofed on that.

Given "the 63 incidents where the duration could be correctly ascertained, 44 (70%) ended in 5 minutes or less, and 23 (37%) ended in 2 minutes or less," the only correct way to restate it is simply "70% of all incidents where the duration could be assessed end in five minutes or less, and of those, more than a third ended in 2 minutes or less."

Conclusion: The likelihood of cops responding before it's all over is significantly less than half.

My bad, and thanks for the catch!

I must confess ignorance here. I don't know what the M8 is in this context, and you have piqued my curiosity.
From Wikipedia: "In the 1970s every branch of the U.S. Armed Forces except the U.S. Air Force carried the .45 ACP M1911 pistol. USAF opted to use .38 special revolvers, which were also carried by some criminal investigation/military police organizations, USAF strategic missile (ICBM) officer crews, and by military flight crewmembers across all the services when serving in combat zones or when engaged in nuclear weapons duties."

The Beretta M9 is the military specification Beretta 92FS.

The M-8, on the other hand, is none other than the Air Force designation for the Smith & Wesson K-38 Combat Masterpiece, Revolver Model 15. (Source). At least "M-8" was the designation typed on my firearms currency card. When we transitioned to the Beretta M9 in 1992, they added another designation: "M9"

I found it odd how many of us officers did not care to qualify with personal weapons during the many times we were given the opportunity to do so."

I had completely forgotten about that. I recall the offers, but never took advantage of them, as I was already proficient in using my own weapons, wasn't allowed to carry then on the aircraft, but did carry the M-8 and M9, so I instead opted to qualify with those.

Perhaps being in the Navy was the main correlating factor, though. Me, I relished every opportunity to shoot. I qualified expert with the M1911A1 and the M16A2.
Sadly, the Air Force chose the M-8/M9 route (sigh). I've shot the M1911A1 half a dozens times. Never qualified on one.

As for the M16A2, I qualified with that two weeks before shipping out overseas on a two-year tour as a liaison officer with the Army. I didn't like it. I've shot both 30-06 and .308, and I prefer both of them to the M-16.

ETA: Pleasure to make your acquaintance, MAC702. :)
 
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Firearms Iinstuctor

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2011
Messages
3,275
Location
northern wis
Over the decades of having shot dozens of qualification courses rifle pistol and shotgun ones. Having been a member of my department firearms training and advisory committee being in charge of redesigning the qualification courses over the years.

I fought the notion the qualification was training. I personally push the idea that qualification should only be use to show that a person meets a minimum knowledge of the weapon they are using.

That once they can demonstrate that minimum knowledge you then train them into using that weapon more effectively.

To many times the administration would make you shoot the qualification course and then declare that you were trained.

Shooting the same course of fire over and over teaches you to shoot that course of fire and doesn't train you to improve you weapon handing skills.

I would much rather see a once an year qualification and then multiple training sessions then multiple qualifications.
 

Grapeshot

Legendary Warrior
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
35,331
Location
Valhalla
Over the decades of having shot dozens of qualification courses rifle pistol and shotgun ones. Having been a member of my department firearms training and advisory committee being in charge of redesigning the qualification courses over the years.

I fought the notion the qualification was training. I personally push the idea that qualification should only be use to show that a person meets a minimum knowledge of the weapon they are using.

That once they can demonstrate that minimum knowledge you then train them into using that weapon more effectively.

To many times the administration would make you shoot the qualification course and then declare that you were trained.

Shooting the same course of fire over and over teaches you to shoot that course of fire and doesn't train you to improve you weapon handing skills.

I would much rather see a once an year qualification and then multiple training sessions then multiple qualifications.
I would much rather see a once [strike]an[/strike] a year qualification and then multiple training sessions [strike]then[/strike] than multiple qualifications.

Grammer & spelling nazi at work. :p
 
Last edited:

Firearms Iinstuctor

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2011
Messages
3,275
Location
northern wis
Grape I would gladly employ you as my personal proof reader.

Just let me know and I'll send all my posts to you first for proof reading.

It is always nice to have helpful volunteers.

But he way your doing it now works for me too.
 

PerBast

Regular Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2016
Messages
44
Location
Ft. Jackson, South Carolina
Military posts and right to carry

Hello and good morning all

I figured it would happen sooner or later. I OC almost everywhere I travel in NC and CC in all other states that I am allowed. However, when I go to work Mon thru Fri at the Reserve center in which my Army medical unit is housed I am forced to leave my gun at home due to the military policies. I travel in civilian cloths to decrease the chances of being a target due to my military connection and I don't go through the hassle of taking off my retention holster when I head into work just because it is a pain to take it off and then put it right back on when I arrive home.

This morning I was entering the building and was confronted by the Navy commander who technically is in charge of the building. He saw my retention holster and asked if I had my handgun in my truck. I told the truth. I didn't have my handgun in my truck. I doubt if he believed me.

So, once again I have to make the choice.

1. Do not carry my weapon with me to and from work, placing myself at an increased risk without ability to defend myself.
2. Park off site and leave my side arm in the vehicle and walk in the half mile.
3. Risk parking on site with my side arm locked in a metal box and remove my retention holster.

Michael

"Who would have ever guessed that by serving in the Armed Forces one would loose their 2nd amendment rights"
 

1245A Defender

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
4,362
Location
north mason county, Washington, USA
Wow!!!

Hello and good morning all

I figured it would happen sooner or later. I OC almost everywhere I travel in NC and CC in all other states that I am allowed. However, when I go to work Mon thru Fri at the Reserve center in which my Army medical unit is housed I am forced to leave my gun at home due to the military policies. I travel in civilian cloths to decrease the chances of being a target due to my military connection and I don't go through the hassle of taking off my retention holster when I head into work just because it is a pain to take it off and then put it right back on when I arrive home.

This morning I was entering the building and was confronted by the Navy commander who technically is in charge of the building. He saw my retention holster and asked if I had my handgun in my truck. I told the truth. I didn't have my handgun in my truck. I doubt if he believed me.

So, once again I have to make the choice.

1. Do not carry my weapon with me to and from work, placing myself at an increased risk without ability to defend myself.
2. Park off site and leave my side arm in the vehicle and walk in the half mile.
3. Risk parking on site with my side arm locked in a metal box and remove my retention holster.

Michael

"Who would have ever guessed that by serving in the Armed Forces one would loose their 2nd amendment rights"

your post makes me have questions...

if you dont put a gun in your holster when you leave the house for work,, why do you carry a holster??


sooo ,,, then why is this?


So, once again I have to make the choice.

1. Do not carry my weapon with me to and from work, placing myself at an increased risk without ability to defend myself.

you have confused me,,,,, and maybe others.....
 

PerBast

Regular Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2016
Messages
44
Location
Ft. Jackson, South Carolina
Military posts and personal weapons

your post makes me have questions...

if you dont put a gun in your holster when you leave the house for work,, why do you carry a holster??


sooo ,,, then why is this?


So, once again I have to make the choice.

1. Do not carry my weapon with me to and from work, placing myself at an increased risk without ability to defend myself.

you have confused me,,,,, and maybe others.....
Afternoon

As I had said, it is a pain in the ass to take it off and then to have to put it back on when I return home from work. Not that big of a deal. And I will definitely have to take it off. But as with other cases, just because somebody has a holster on does not mean they are carrying a weapon. Gun racks in vehicles do not mean you have a long gun in the vehicle.

Clarify #1. Do not carry my side arm to work (leaving it in the car secured in a metal box) which means that while I am driving to and from work (25 min) I am not able to defend myself. Should I have to stop at a store on the way to or from work or head to South Carolina from work I would not be armed. Does that clarify.

Michael
 

solus

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
8,718
Location
here nc
Hello and good morning all

I figured it would happen sooner or later. I OC almost everywhere I travel in NC and CC in all other states that I am allowed. However, when I go to work Mon thru Fri at the Reserve center in which my Army medical unit is housed I am forced to leave my gun at home due to the military policies. I travel in civilian cloths to decrease the chances of being a target due to my military connection and I don't go through the hassle of taking off my retention holster when I head into work just because it is a pain to take it off and then put it right back on when I arrive home.

This morning I was entering the building and was confronted by the Navy commander who technically is in charge of the building. He saw my retention holster and asked if I had my handgun in my truck. I told the truth. I didn't have my handgun in my truck. I doubt if he believed me.

So, once again I have to make the choice.

1. Do not carry my weapon with me to and from work, placing myself at an increased risk without ability to defend myself.
2. Park off site and leave my side arm in the vehicle and walk in the half mile.
3. Risk parking on site with my side arm locked in a metal box and remove my retention holster.

Michael

"Who would have ever guessed that by serving in the Armed Forces one would loose their 2nd amendment rights"
darn, leave it to the commander asking the wrong question at the right time.

btw, there is a fourth choice...get out of the reserves!!

ipse
 
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